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-   -   Toasted Oat Pale Ale (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f64/toasted-oat-pale-ale-116448/)

snailsongs 04-28-2009 11:51 AM

Toasted Oat Pale Ale
 
This is a creamy nutty english pale ale, just a touch on the sweet side of the style which works well with the mouthfeel of the oats. I brought this to my first ever homebrew club meeting and got positive responses from those that tried it.

When I was researching putting this recipe together I came across a thread in which somebody mentioned a pale oat beer that was dubbed 'oat-soda'.....that would be an apt name for this easy-drinking pale oat brew as well...it's about as drinkable as soda (....refill please)!


Type: All Grain
Batch Size: 5.00 gal
Brewer: Bradley Leland
Boil Size: 6.25 gal
Boil Time: 60 min
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70.0


Ingredients

Amount Item Type % or IBU
6.00 lb Pale Malt, Maris Otter (3.0 SRM) Grain 65.8 %
2.00 lb Oats, Toasted (1.0 SRM) Grain 21.9 %
0.50 lb Victory Malt (25.0 SRM) Grain 5.5 %
0.31 lb Special B Malt (180.0 SRM) Grain 3.4 %
0.25 lb Honey Malt (25.0 SRM) Grain 2.8 %
0.80 oz Williamette [5.50%] (60 min) (First Wort Hop) Hops 18.8 IBU
0.75 oz Fuggles [4.50%] (20 min) Hops 7.9 IBU
0.50 oz Goldings, East Kent [5.00%] (5 min) Hops 1.9 IBU
1 Pkgs English Ale (White Labs #WLP002) Yeast-Ale



Est Original Gravity: 1.047 SG
Est Final Gravity: 1.015 SG
Estimated Alcohol by Vol: 4.2 %
Bitterness: 28.7 IBU
Calories: 43 cal/pint
Est Color: 11.3 SRM


I mashed this at 155-156F and came out with an FG of 1.019 when all was said and done. This turned out well, and I ended up with a nice rich beer for it's gravity and ABV. It is still very drinkable nonetheless.

Hops are present (and pleasant) but not overwhelming, typical for the english hop varieties and the style. You could bump the IBU's a few points without drastically altering the profile here, but it's great as is. It is a slightly malt-forward beer designed to showcase the nutty-toasted flavor and creaminess of the oats, and the hops provide adequate ballast. It is not overly malty like a scotch ale or barleywine.

I toasted the oats for approximately 20-30 minutes at 350F, turning them a couple times and watching them carefully (they can go from just right to overdone in a heartbeat). Then I paper bagged them and let them rest for 2 weeks to allow the volatile aromas and compounds to waft away and mellow. The aroma of the oats comes all the way through the beer, and when you pour this you can still detect that nutty oatmeal cookie aroma in there. It's great! I chose special B and Honey malt, in small amounts, to give a little raisin-like sweetness for a kind of oatmeal-raisin effect.

I also pushed this one through, bottling at 10 days from primary, but I wasn't completely happy with the flavor until it had been in the bottle a few weeks. I think, at least if you're going to keg this, you should let it rest a minimum of 2 weeks before drinking. It is pretty good early on, but the honey malt, even at just 4 oz, seems to dominate the other flavors at first, yet with a little time at rest the toasted oats and victory begin to mingle and the beer really comes together. It has turned out to be an extremely smooth, enjoyable easy drinker.....I really could drink this beer all day long like someone might drink soda pop. I'm passing it on because I think it turned out very well and it is a unique twist on the english pale ale. If you brew it, let me know what you think. :tank:

conpewter 04-28-2009 12:25 PM

Sounds great! I love my oatmeal stouts so this sounds good. How did the color/clarity turn out? I know oats can make things cloudy.

snailsongs 04-28-2009 01:01 PM

If I can figure out how, I'll edit and post a pic or two.

If you secondary this or give it a chance to clear, it will be as clear as any other ale. It is currently pouring clearer from the bottle than my APA, IPA and (of course) dunkelweizen.

78kombi 05-31-2009 12:26 AM

this recipe sounds like a good beer for late September when it starts to cool off here in Massachusetts...i gotta get a batch going, im gonna make it a half mash, so ill sub the 6lbs pale malt for a sack of 4lb light DME keep the specials and 2lbs of oats, also i like the sounds of the hop schedule, so ill use that too..

snailsongs 06-01-2009 01:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 78kombi (Post 1354542)
this recipe sounds like a good beer for late September when it starts to cool off here in Massachusetts...i gotta get a batch going, im gonna make it a half mash, so ill sub the 6lbs pale malt for a sack of 4lb light DME keep the specials and 2lbs of oats, also i like the sounds of the hop schedule, so ill use that too..

It's really a drinkable beer. It's not as light as your average english bitter/pale but it's not heavy like a bock or porter by any means.

If you're going to do a partial mash, you'll have to keep some base malt in the mash to convert the oats properly. I think you could steep them for some of the flavor and starch, but you won't get converted sugars from the oats unless you mash with a grain that has some diastatic power.....Deathbrewer has posted an awesomely simple and effective method for doing partial mashes on your stovetop here.

let me know how it goes if you decide to do it....:)

78kombi 06-01-2009 03:14 PM

ok ill keep that in mind, i could use 1 lb MO and 5 dme light and then the rest of the specials?

snailsongs 06-02-2009 02:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 78kombi (Post 1356481)
ok ill keep that in mind, i could use 1 lb MO and 5 dme light and then the rest of the specials?

I would use at least 2 lbs....I would try to match the total weight of the adjuncts with maris otter, just to ensure good conversion.


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