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Old 12-02-2007, 01:38 AM   #1
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Default Yet another Brezen recipe

Some time ago I was looking for German Brezen recipes and came across this document: http://www.backmittel.de/BBZ/pdf/Her...gengebaeck.pdf

This is a German manual intended for small bakeries on how to make all sorts of laugengebaeck. Laugengebaeck is the German word for baking goods that have been treated with lye before baking. I'm a big fan of Laugenbroetchen (lye-roll or brezel-roll). After reading this document I learned that there are 3 styles of brezels in Germany that have a slightly different recipe. I tried the recipe for the Bavarian style dough and was amazed how close I came to what I was used to and loved so much in Germany. I had baked rolls and bread before, which helped.

Here is the recipe (in metric of course ):

500g Bread flour
20g DME (yes dried malt extract)
10g margarine or oil
11g salt
15g fresh yeast or 1 tsp instant yeast (I use the latter)
245g warm water

This recipe has been scaled down from the 10,000 kg version given on page 6. The original recipe called for Ulmer Goldmalz Granulat, which is basically baking grade malt extract that is used to enhance the rise and the flavor of the dough. I substituted with DME and currently this is actually the only use for the DME that I have left.

Prepare the dough by mixing the ingredients well and kneed the dough for about 10 min. Then let it rise. You can also put it in the fridge overnight wich will actually improve the final product. Form the brezels or rolls. I like to make an assortment of brezels, knots (a simple overhand knot) and rolls. Let it rise again. The long strings of dough are best made when the dough has not risen to much and you may have to let them rest covered for a few minutes to relax the gluten before you can stretch them further. Keep practicing.

Though the original recipe called for lye, I used a 3% (by weight) solution of baking soda. Simply add 30g baking soda to 1 L water. You will get the same sheen and taste as you get with lye if you boil the brezen in the baking soda solution for about 30s before baking. Place them on parchement paper on a baking sheet and sprinkle with some coarse salt . When making rolls, cut the top with a sharp knife.

Bake in a 350 - 400 *F oven (I don't remember exactly what temp I used) until they look done.


(the wite balance may be off for this picture)

Enjoy.

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Old 04-23-2008, 08:16 PM   #2
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Kaiser, that document is awesome! However, my German is lousy and it is difficult for me to get much more than the recipes out of it. Have you found any English texts on Brezen?

Thanks for the help!

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Old 04-23-2008, 08:34 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boerderij Kabouter
Have you found any English texts on Brezen?
Haven't searched

To me that can't be much that is better than a document that explains how to make Prezels to a commercial baker.

Kai
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Old 04-23-2008, 09:28 PM   #4
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Thanks for posting this up Kai, I was wondering how you made those so tasty!

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Old 10-22-2009, 05:01 PM   #5
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Default Laugengebaeck

I am currently in the process of trying your pretzels, thus I can't provide any feedback on the results yet, but I am very hopeful... Being that we are German immigrants, the baked goods are definitely a category of food we miss.

Two quick corrections to the original post. The "Herstellung von Laugengebaecken" (Production of Lye Baked Goods) is now at a new URL:

http://www.meistermarken-ulmerspatz....gengebaeck.pdf

I was curious about the amount of dry yeast you use. I converted 15g of cake yeast to be 2 tsp of dry yeast. (2 1/2 tsp dry yeast = 0.6 oz (17g) of cake yeast.) Your recipe uses 1 tsp. Has that been sufficient for you?

Again, I'm looking forward to the results. Thank you for posting the link to the pdf document. That's a great starter point.

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Old 10-23-2009, 04:26 PM   #6
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Thanks for the new link. That document is a really good one.

1 tsp of yeast has been sufficient for me. Laugengeback doesn't rise much anyway.

I just bought some lye and next time I make them I'll go with a true lye bath instead of the hot baking soda option.

Kai

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Old 03-14-2010, 12:20 AM   #7
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I made these tonight. There were some small differences from the recipe I had posted and I wanted to try this out... particularly the DME (vs. brown sugar). I made a few other changes... I cut out the salt (for the dough mixture) and instead of using oil I used salted butter. I also used a 3% lye solution. The outside of the pretzels have a distinct yet fairly thin crust and the inside is very soft and chewy. They are wonderful.

Not the best picture, but you get the idea...

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Old 03-19-2010, 07:38 PM   #8
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I made these the other day, following the recipe pretty closely. They turned out wonderfully - just like the ones I had in Germany! All I was missing was a nice hefe and some weisswurst!

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Old 03-22-2010, 01:12 PM   #9
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In case you haven't seen it yet, I added a how-to for Brezels on my wiki: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php...gengeb%C3%A4ck

Kai

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Old 03-23-2010, 01:40 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaiser View Post
In case you haven't seen it yet, I added a how-to for Brezels on my wiki: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php...gengeb%C3%A4ck

Kai
Thanks...

I've used Alton Brown's recipe, along with the boiling baking soda trick, since I don't have a readily-available source of lye. It works well enough for me, but if there is a definite benefit (other than being historically correct) to using lye, I'll do it. I'm not afraid of chemicals; I have handled lots of nasty stuff in the past (like HF and fuming Nitric), and know to respect it.

Have you done an experiment pitting the lye vs. baking soda on the same dough batch?
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