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Old 03-09-2008, 10:32 PM   #1
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Default Where did Creamed Chipped Beef come from?

SOS. Nasty, slimy stuff. I think it is the German equivalent of lutfisk (lutefisk).

The earliest reference I can find is a 1910 Army cookbook, so it must go back further than that.

Any ideas?

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Old 03-09-2008, 10:50 PM   #2
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LOL...I could only go back to the 1910 army manual as well for S.O.S.

I haven't had it in years (My dad fought in WWII) and my mom would fix it on occasion....It's actually not bad. I did find some gourmet recipes for it just now, using wine reduction....I might just have to whip some up while it is still winter. It seems like a winter dish, after all.

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Old 03-09-2008, 10:58 PM   #3
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I love creamed chipped beef.

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Old 03-09-2008, 11:12 PM   #4
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It's not nasty or slimy if done right...in fact it's basically a roux or bechemel sauce with dried beef added to it....it can be quite good... maybe as a wine sauce..or with a hint of truffel or morell mushroom...yum!

In case you're wondering what wine to serve with it...Here's what Emeril has to say!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emeril Lagase
Creamed Chipped Beef with Pinot Gris / Grigio or Cabernet Sauvignon

The Pinot Gris is a refreshing choice with just enough crispness to contrast with the creaminess of chipped beef. A big, tannic Cabernet Sauvignon would be another great choice to balance the salty beef.
I'm thinking Rogue's Dead guy would be a good beer for it

(I'm deep into google and getting nothing earlier thant 1910...grr)
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Last edited by Revvy; 03-09-2008 at 11:15 PM.
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Old 03-09-2008, 11:22 PM   #5
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WOOT WOOT...I found something older that 1910!!!

On page 19 in google (for chipped beef)...

On a page about Frontier women I found a refrence to "chipped beef".

http://www.kindredtrails.com/Frontier-Women-Page1.html

Quote:
Families who were departing along the Oregon Trail gathered at small towns on the Missouri River, called "jumping off points." Independence, St. Joseph, and Council Bluffs were among these towns. At this point their wagon trains would have been almost completely outfitted. The wagon, which was made of seasoned wood to withstand extreme temperatures, was hauled by four to six oxen. Tools and spare parts were stored under the wagon. Utensils including forks and knives, plates, cups, a kettle, fry pan, and a coffee pot were packed inside. Their food consisted of about 200 pounds of flour, 150 pounds of bacon, 10 pounds of coffee, 20 pounds of sugar, and 10 pounds of salt.(4) Chipped beef, rice, dry beans, dry fruits, pickles, and other foods were also packed. In total, the outfitting usually cost between $500 and $1000 ($10,000-$20,000 today).(5) Sometimes it was difficult to know what to bring, and some items had to be abandoned along the way. "Two wagons were filled with merchandise which we hoped to sell at fabulous prices when we should arrive in 'the land of gold' [California]. The theory of this was good but the practice - well, we never got the goods over the first mountain." (6) Wagon trains arrived at a jumping off point in March and left in April when the snow melted enough. Hopefully they would make it to Oregon before winter.
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Old 03-09-2008, 11:36 PM   #6
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I'm on page thirty something of google, and i've found a connection to beef jerky...AND I have seen old cowboy chuck wagon recipes for stews and such that used rehydrated pemmican or beef jerky as the meat source. So I'm going to say at some point after the white's discovered dried beef (jerky) as a foodsource from the native americans and began rehydrating it, someone, probably a french settler's wife used it in a Bechemel Sauce...

Here's the info on Jerky...

Quote:
The Native North Americans originally taught the settlers how to pull or cut meat into long strips. The strips of beef would be cured, seasoned and smoked. The word jerky comes from the Native American word “charqui” meaning jerked beef. The Native American jerky was sliced thin and dried on rocks in the sun. We know it as pemmican-style dried meat today.
Now cowboys liked their jerky thick and meaty. This jerky was hand cut and pulled from a side of beef. They would use the leftover cuts of beef to make the jerky.

Their jerky was a knotted and twisted hunk of beef, that was salted, and hung over tree limbs to dry in the sun and wind. The cowboys carried this beef jerky in their saddlebags. When they were out on the range for long periods of time this jerky was their only source of protein and nutrition.
And here's the history of Bechemel sauce.

Quote:
Béchamel Sauce (bay-shah-mel) - As the housewife in the 17th Century did not have the luxury of modern refrigeration, they were wary of using milk in their recipes. Peddlers were known to sell watered down or rancid produce. Basically, only the rich or royalty could use milk in their sauces.

In France, it is one of the four basic sauces called "meres" or "mother sauces" from which all other sauces derive. It is also know as "white sauce." It is a smooth, white sauce made from a roux made with flour, boiled milk, and butter. It is usually served with white meats, eggs, and vegetables. It forms the basis of many other sauces.

History: There are four theories on the origin of Béchamel Sauce:

* The Italian version of who created this sauce is that it was created in the 14th century and was introduced by the Italian chefs of Catherine de Medici (1519-1589), the Italian-born Queen of France. In 1533, as part of an Italian-French dynastic alliance, Catherine was married to Henri, Duke of Orleans (the future King Henri II of France. It is because of the Italian cooks and pastry makers who followed her to France that the French came to know the taste of Italian cooking that they introduced to the French court. Antonin Carème(1784-1833), celebrated chef and author, wrote in 1822: "The cooks of the second half of the 1700’s came to know the taste of Italian cooking that Catherine de’Medici introduced to the French court."

* Béchamel Sauce was invented by Duke Philippe De Mornay (1549-1623), Governor of Saumur, and Lord of the Plessis Marly in the 1600s. Béchamel Sauce is a variation of the basic white sauce of Mornay. He is also credited with being the creator of Mornay Sauce, Sauce Chasseur, Sauce Lyonnaise, and Sauce Porto.

* Marquis Louis de Béchamel (1603–1703), a 17th century financier who held the honorary post of chief steward of King Louis XIV's (1643-1715) household, is also said to have invented Béchamel Sauce when trying to come up with a new way of serving and eating dried cod. There are no historical records to verify that he was a gourmet, a cook, or the inventor of Béchamel Sauce.

The 17th century Duke d'Escars supposedly is credited with stating: "That fellow Béchameil has all the luck! I was serving breast of chicken a la crème more than 20 years before he was born, but I have never had the chance of giving my name to even the most modest sauce."

* It is more likely that Chef Francois Pierre de la Varenne (1615-1678) created Béchamel Sauce. He was a court chef during King Louis XIV's (1643-1715) reign, during the same time that Béchamel was there. He is often cited as being the founder of haute cuisine (which would define classic French cuisine). La Varenne wrote Le Cuisinier Francois (The True French Cook), which included Béchamel Sauce. It is thought that he dedicated it to Béchamel as a compliment. La Varenne recipes used roux made from flour and butter (or other animal fat) instead of using bread as a thickener for sauces.
So I'm really thinking French settlers, 1700's, beef jerky and Bechemal sauce....
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Old 03-09-2008, 11:37 PM   #7
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SOS is comfort food.

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Old 03-09-2008, 11:45 PM   #8
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I love the stuff, My grandpa used to own a resturaunt and it was a huge hit there. Its delicious if done right.

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Old 03-09-2008, 11:59 PM   #9
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I love the stuff, but most people don't. My grandfather used to call it what it was called in the navy - $hit on a shingle.

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Old 03-10-2008, 12:13 AM   #10
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What's wrong with lutefisk?
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