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Old 12-25-2012, 03:22 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by TNGabe View Post
Your post is a little broad for a specific answer. Imagine if someone posted "I bought 200 lbs of 2-row, made beer, and it sucks. What do I do?"

Whole wheat flour does need to be handled differently than white flour. You won't get the same end product with whole wheat as you would with white flour, but 100% whole wheat bread can be soft and doesn't need vital wheat gluten added, although there is a popular line of books where many of the recipes include it.

Poke around online. The bread forum has some very solid recipes.
Yeah I know it was a little broad and you know it was and still is as good a question I can come up with. I am not one to spend much time in the kitchen unless cooking a steak or something. This whole foray into making bread has flat out kicked my butt but I am going to persevere and master the damn thing one way or another.

I am not a fan of wheat beers but I do love cracked wheat for breakfast. Looks like I got about a lifetime supply of breakfast now LOL
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Old 12-25-2012, 03:35 PM   #12
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The nice thing about baking is that you get to sample the results a lot sooner. Try this recipe to get started.

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Old 12-27-2012, 05:35 PM   #13
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Why would you need to add gluten? Homeground whole-wheat flour has plenty of gluten in it. It's just a lot heavier because of all the bran and germ.
You could remove the gran and germ I guess. Let me know when figure out a good way to do that.


I've been making bread with 100% homeground wheat since the early 1980's. I have never had the dough rise well without adding something to it. That something is either store purchased flour or wheat gluten. Using 100% my own ground flour makes for a VERY dense loaf of bread. Tasty but dense.

I'm always open to learning and constantly looking for ways to improve my techniques though so if anyone has some, I'm all ears.
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Old 12-31-2012, 03:49 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnj

You could remove the gran and germ I guess. Let me know when figure out a good way to do that.

I've been making bread with 100% homeground wheat since the early 1980's. I have never had the dough rise well without adding something to it. That something is either store purchased flour or wheat gluten. Using 100% my own ground flour makes for a VERY dense loaf of bread. Tasty but dense.

I'm always open to learning and constantly looking for ways to improve my techniques though so if anyone has some, I'm all ears.
Sorry, didn't mean to sound snippy. Just interested in the chemistry -- since hard wheats, especially, already have plenty of gluten, not sure why you'd need more, or why exactly that would trap more co2. I do a lot of whole wheat breads, but usually with a sponge/starter -- maybe that helps leaven?
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Old 12-31-2012, 04:01 PM   #15
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Boil wheat berries until soft and add spices. Kinda acts like rice or risotto. If you add some maple syrup, then it really tastes great. But this assumes you have un-milled wheat.

My experience with WW bread is that a sourdough starter works really well. (the sour acts as an enzyme to soften the wheat?) But a major component to leaven whole wheat has been adding sugar and keeping the dough really moist. Again, just my experience, no actual science behind it.

or just make lots of wheat beer.

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Old 12-31-2012, 04:07 PM   #16
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ong- I didn't want to sound like a know it all, cause I do not. I just know what i've seen work/not work for many years.

You say you're making whole wheat bread but are you grinding the wheat yourself? If I use store bought whole wheat four I get different results.

I once made a few different loafs using exact measurements, only changing/adding Vital Wheat Gluten. the more gluten I added, the better my bread would rise.

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Old 12-31-2012, 04:17 PM   #17
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Hey pnj - You make an awesome point. There's a big variance when you factor in the kind of wheat and fineness of the flour. I've never had particularly good luck with store bought WW, but I wonder if that's b/c it was something lower in protein, thus requiring vital gluten. I just recently switched to hard red with a coarse grind, but it probably behaves vastly different from you homemilled product.

But kudos for doing a side by side experiment! I'm definitely going to need to look into that.

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Old 01-01-2013, 01:44 PM   #18
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I do grind it myself and today I am going to try a mix of half white and half red

Heres hoping for the best

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Old 01-01-2013, 05:39 PM   #19
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Well I went all white this time and it turned out good. Downright tasty even

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Old 01-06-2013, 05:00 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnj
ong- I didn't want to sound like a know it all, cause I do not. I just know what i've seen work/not work for many years.

You say you're making whole wheat bread but are you grinding the wheat yourself? If I use store bought whole wheat four I get different results.

I once made a few different loafs using exact measurements, only changing/adding Vital Wheat Gluten. the more gluten I added, the better my bread would rise.
Hmm. No, I've just used store bought WW flour. Maybe I'll try throwing some wheat berries in my Corona and see what happens!
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