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Old 03-14-2013, 04:47 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Xpertskir View Post
Tall order...but certainly intimidating

Mole`
Lol, Mole deserves a whole separate thread. You're talking 30+ ingredients a crap load of technical processes and instructions. It would take one person hours to assemble in writing in a clear enough manner for a novice to follow without confusion. Even for the trained chef, it takes years to perfect Mole. I made it once myself and it was very good, but I would advise looking up Rick Bayless' recipe for Black Oaxacan Mole.
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Old 03-14-2013, 04:51 PM   #32
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Mole instructions:

Find good Mexican restaurant


I've done a few psuedo-moles with BBQ sauce, onions, garlic & chocolate...pass. It's like comparing one-dimensional artificial raspberry flavored candy to real raspberries.

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Old 03-14-2013, 04:58 PM   #33
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Lol, Mole deserves a whole separate thread. You're talking 30+ ingredients a crap load of technical processes and instructions. It would take one person hours to assemble in writing in a clear enough manner for a novice to follow without confusion. Even for the trained chef, it takes years to perfect Mole. I made it once myself and it was very good, but I would advise looking up Rick Bayless' recipe for Black Oaxacan Mole.
Oh, I know...

I can cook very well so there wasn't much I could think to ask...you said intimidating in the OP. I will look at Bayless' recipe...if there is any gringo I trust for authentic mexican its that goofy white boy.


Assuming you were classically trained, lets go with something right in your wheelhouse, simple but tricky to do well.

Chicken liver mousse or pate`
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Old 03-14-2013, 04:59 PM   #34
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Mole instructions:

Find good Mexican restaurant


I've done a few psuedo-moles with BBQ sauce, onions, garlic & chocolate...pass. It's like comparing one-dimensional artificial raspberry flavored candy to real raspberries.
There are only a handful of restaurants in my town I would classify as good...and its certainly not the mexican restaurants. Having lived in a very Latin area of Chicago I am more than a little picky about my Mexican food.
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Old 03-14-2013, 05:03 PM   #35
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The bayless recipe for anyone not familiar with google
OAXACAN BLACK MOLE WITH BRAISED CHICKEN

Serves 8 (with about 10 cups of sauce, which will mean leftovers to make enchiladas or more chicken with)

11 medium (about 5 1/2 ounces) dried mulato chiles

6 medium (about 2 ounces) dried chihualces chiles (see note in Variations and Improvisations below)

6 medium (about 2 ounces) dried pasilla chiles

1 dried chipotle chile (preferably the tan-brown chipotle meco)

1 corn tortilla, torn into small pieces

2 1/4-inch-thick slices of white onion

4 garlic cloves, unpeeled

About 2 cups rich-tasting lard or vegetable oil (for frying the chiles)

1/2 cup sesame seeds, plus a few extra for garnish

1/4 cup pecan halves

1/4 cup unskinned or Spanish peanuts

1/4 cup unskinned almonds

About 10 cups chicken broth (canned or homemade)

1 pound (2 medium-large or 6 to 8 plum) green tomatoes, roughly chopped

4 ounces (2 to 3 medium) tomatillos, husked, rinsed and roughly chopped

2 slices stale bread, toasted until very dark

1/4 teaspoon cloves, preferably freshly ground

1/2 teaspoon black pepper, preferably freshly ground

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, preferably freshly ground Mexican canela

A scant teaspoon oregano, preferably Mexican

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme

1/2 ripe banana

1/2 cup (about 3 ounces) finely chopped Mexican chocolate

2 or 3 avocado leaves (if you have them)

Salt, about 1 tablespoon depending on the saltiness of the broth

Sugar, about 1/4 cup (or a little more)

2 large (3 1/2- to 4-pound) chickens, cut into quarters

1. Getting started. Pull out the stems (and attached seed pods) from the chiles, tear them open and shake or scrape out the seeds, collecting them as you go.

Now, do something that will seem very odd: scoop the seeds into an ungreased medium-size (8- to 9-inch) skillet along with the torn-up tortilla, set over medium heat, turn on an exhaust fan, open a window and toast your seeds and tortilla, shaking the pan regularly, until thoroughly burned to charcoal black, about 15 minutes. (This is very important to the flavor and color of the mole.) Now, scrape them into a fine-mesh strainer and rinse for 30 seconds or so, then transfer to a blender.

Set an ungreased skillet or griddle over medium heat, lay on a piece of aluminum foil, and lay the onion slices and garlic cloves on that. Roast until soft and very dark (about 5 minutes on each side of the onion slices – peel it off the foil to turn it; about 15 minutes for the garlic – turn it frequently as it roasts). Cool the garlic a bit, peel it and combine with the onion in a large bowl.

While the onion and garlic are roasting, turn on the oven to 350 degrees (for toasting nuts), return the skillet to medium heat, measure in a scant 2 cups of the lard or oil (you'll need about 1/2-inch depth), and, when hot, begin frying the chiles a couple at a time: They'll unfurl quickly, then release their aroma and piquancy (keep that exhaust on and window open) and, after about 30 seconds, have lightened in color and be well toasted (they should be crisp when cool, but not burnt smelling). Drain them well, gather them into a large bowl, cover with hot tap water, and let rehydrate for 30 minutes, stirring regularly to ensure even soaking. Drain, reserving the soaking liquid.

While the chiles are soaking, toast the seeds and nuts. Spread the sesame seeds onto a baking sheet or ovenproof skillet, spread the pecans, peanuts and almonds onto another baking sheet or skillet, then set both into the oven. In about 12 minutes the sesame seeds will have toasted to a dark brown; the nuts will take slightly longer. Add all of them to the blender (reserving a few sesame seeds for garnish), along with 1 1/2 cups of the chicken broth and blend to as smooth a puree as you can. Transfer to a small bowl.

Without rinsing the blender, combine the green tomatoes and tomatillos with another 1/2 cup of the broth and puree. Pour into another bowl. Again, without rinsing the blender, combine the roasted onion and garlic with the toasted bread, cloves, black pepper, cinnamon, oregano, thyme, banana and 3/4 cup broth. Blend to a smooth puree and pour into a small bowl.

Finally, without rinsing the blender, scoop in half of the chiles, measure in 1/2 cup of the soaking liquid, blend to a smooth puree, then pour into another bowl. Repeat with the remaining chiles and another 1/2 cup of the soaking liquid.

2. From four purees to mole. In a very large (8- to 9-quart) pot (preferably a Dutch oven or Mexican cazuela), heat 3 tablespoons of the lard or oil (some of what you used for the chiles is fine) and set over medium-high heat. When very hot, add the tomato puree and stir and scrape (a flat-sided wooden spatula works well here) for 15 to 20 minutes until reduced, thick as tomato paste, and very dark (it'll be the color of cinnamon stick and may be sticking to the pot in places). Add the nut puree and continue the stirring and scraping until reduced, thick and dark again (this time it'll be the color of black olive paste), about 8 minutes. Then, as you guessed it, add the banana-spice puree and stir and scrape for another 7 or 8 minutes as the whole thing simmers back down to a thick mass about the same color it was before you added this one.

Add the chile puree, stir well and let reduce over medium-low heat until very thick and almost black, about 30 minutes, stirring regularly (but, thankfully, not constantly). Stir in the remaining 7 cups of broth, the chocolate and avocado leaves (if you have them), partially cover and simmer gently for about an hour, for all the flavors to come together. Season with salt and sugar (remembering that this is quite a sweet mole and that sugar helps balance the dark, toasty flavors). Remove the avocado leaves.

In batches in a loosely covered blender, puree the sauce until as smooth as possible, then pass through a medium-mesh strainer into a large bowl.

3. Finishing the dish. Return the mole to the same pot and heat it to a simmer. Nestle the leg-and-thigh quarters of the chicken into the bubbling black liquid, partially cover and time 15 minutes, then nestle in the breast quarters, partially cover and simmer for 20 to 25 minutes, until all the chicken is done.

With a slotted spoon, fish out the chicken pieces and transfer them to a large warm platter. Spoon a generous amount of the mole over and around them, sprinkle with the reserved sesame seeds and set triumphantly before your lucky guests.

Advance Preparation: The mole can be completed through Step 2 several days ahead (it gets better, in fact); cover and refrigerate. Completele Step 3 shortly before serving.

VARIATIONS AND IMPROVISATIONS: Chilhuacle chiles are very difficult to find unless you're in Oaxaca (even then they're sometimes hard to obtain). Without them you can make a very respectable black mole with 6 ounces (12 total) dried mulato chiles, 2 1/2 ounces (8 total) dried pasilla chiles and 1 ounce (4 total) dried guajillo chiles.

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Old 03-14-2013, 05:38 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xpertskir View Post
The bayless recipe for anyone not familiar with google, OAXACAN BLACK MOLE WITH BRAISED CHICKEN
Yes. There is also a video instructional floating around the net, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xpertskir View Post
I can cook very well so there wasn't much I could think to ask...you said intimidating in the OP. I will look at Bayless' recipe...if there is any gringo I trust for authentic mexican its that goofy white boy.
Haha, but I also said, "Don't throw me any nutty curveballs though!!"

Bayless is actually quite skilled in authentic Mexican fare. I love Yucatecan cuisine myself, which is very different from Oaxacan. Still, you can count me as another gringo with a passion for authentic Latin flavors. I just don't believe that if I spent several hours assembling a detailed Mole recipe, that anyone here would even attempt it. And even if they tried, they would probably screw it up in some big way if they weren't trained.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xpertskir View Post
Assuming you were classically trained, lets go with something right in your wheelhouse, simple but tricky to do well. Chicken liver mousse or pate`
No problemo. I'll write it up for you.
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Old 03-14-2013, 05:56 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by Xpertskir View Post
Tall order...but certainly intimidating

Mole`
I've got this one. Unless you have a whole day to spend on this, don't try it. Just buy some at the store and re-hydrate according to instructions.
Here goes. This is for mole rojo. I have been to Oaxaca, where they have seven different kinds. If you want a different color, let me know.

Mole Coloradito Oaxaqueno
Stock.
1 gal fresh, cold water
2 chickens, cut up into 8ths, necks and backbones reserved
1 onion
1 clove
2 carrots, cut
1 celery heart
1 head garlic
1 bay leaf
1 chile de arbol
6 peppercorns
1 sprig thyme
1 handful parsley stems
salt to taste

Add chicken necks and backs to water in large stockpot and bring to a boil. Add rest of ingredients except chicken. Boil 15 minutes. Add chicken pieces and poach 30-45 minutes until tender. Remove chicken from stock, strain and reserve.
Mole:
20 ancho chiles, stemmed and seeded
20 guajillo chiles, stemmed and seeded
1 onion
1/2 head garlic, peeled
2 cloves
4 peppercorns
2 allspice
1 inch piece
1 stick Mexican cinnamon
1.25 lb ripe tomatoes, cut in fourths
1 sprig mexican oregano or 1/2 tsp dry
2 tbl corn oil
small handfull whole almonds(6 or so)
20 raisins
1/2 ripe plantain
1/4 loaf french bread, sliced
8 tbl sesame seeds, untoasted
1 tbl lard or crisco
2oz bar mexican chocolate
chicken stock from before
salt, to taste
Heat 2 c water
Over low heat on cast-iron skillet, toast chiles on both sides. Put in bowl and cover with hot water to soften for 30 min. Puree with as little water as possible and strain to remove skins.
In skillet, toast peppercorns, cloves and cinnamon. Roast garlic and onion and, when cool, puree with spices and enough stock to make it work.
Over medium heat in un-oiled sautee pan, cook tomatoes with oregano until cooked down, about 20 min. Puree and strain.
Heat 2 tbl corn oil in sautee pan and brown plantain and bread slices, 10-15 min. Add raisins until they plump up. Remove from pan. Toast almonds. Blend plantains, bread, raisins and almonds with stock(1 1/2c) until smooth
In same sautee pan with 1 tbl oil, toast sesame seeds. Cool and grind with mortar and pestle
In big Dutch Oven, heat lard until smoking. Add chile puree and cook 15-20 minutes.(watch for splattering lard, just keep stirring) Add Tomato puree and cook 15 min, stirring constantly. Add onion/spice mixture and stir well. Add plantain mix and sesame seeds. Cook, stirring constantly for 10 min. Add 5 cups stock to thin and add chocolate. When dissolved, add salt to taste and reduce over low heat 30 min, stirring occasionally.
Add poached chicken pieces to heat through and add more broth if sauce is too thick.
Serve with fresh corn tortillas
serves 12-14
Recipe is how I make Susana Trilling's mole recipe
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Old 03-14-2013, 06:01 PM   #38
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Thanks for typing that out (or copy paste). How long will this keep? How does it freeze? I have a vacuum sealer if that matters.

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Old 03-14-2013, 06:16 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by bobbrews View Post
Someone else messaged me this question. I directed them to Seriouseats.com - They have an entire section on Pizza recipes, with illustrations, recipes, tips, etc. They are very dedicated to getting everything exactly right. Check it out. Everything I would tell you is already covered there with more simplicity and science.
http://slice.seriouseats.com/the_pizza_lab/?ref=fresh
Serious Eats is a great site. If you want to know the science of things, Kenji (a former Cooks Illustrated guy) does an excellent job testing and re-testing things.

My pizza sauce (no amounts given, you should tailor to your preferences):
20 oz can of diced tomatoes.
Oregano (fresh leaves chopped)
Garlic (I usually use a press)
Basil (fresh leaves chopped)
Crushed Red Pepper Flakes
Salt
Red wine vinegar (optional, but can be added to give a kick if needed)
Lots of GOOD olive oil

Saute garlic (crushed, sliced, whatever) over medium heat with some olive oil.
When turning light-brown, remove from the heat and add can of diced tomatoes. (I remove from the heat, as one time I had some splashing that ignited some of the hot olive oil).
Keep it going over medium heat, stir every now and then, until the tomatoes are drying up.
Add additional olive oil until it starts to look a little glossy and wet again. Add red pepper flake and a splash or two of red wine vinegar if you like a little vinegar kick in your sauce and cook til dry again.
Add additional olive oil until it starts to look a little glossy and wet again. Add basil/oregano (I use fresh), salt, pepper if desired. Remove from heat once you start smelling the herbs.

It should look chunky and sweetened up (but not cloying) from concentrating the tomato flavor.

I have let this go on the stove over low heat for hours and done it quicker over medium heat. The result is pretty similar.
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