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Old 09-24-2011, 01:34 PM   #1
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Default Pig Roast

Hey everyone, I'm new to the forums but was hoping ya'll could help me out with something. I'm going to be doing a pig roast here in a few weeks, and the only pigs we can get around here are skinned. We're renting a rotisserie and are going to be cooking it that way, but the question i have is if there is anything that needs to be done to the pig before cooking.

We were told that we could wrap it in cheesecloth and chicken wire to help give it an artifical skin, but is that even necessary? Or would it be fine to just cook it skinless with nothing on the outside? Thanks!

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Old 09-24-2011, 01:55 PM   #2
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It'll cook ok without skin. Problem is, as it gets more tender and finished, meat will start falling off. It'll be hard to take off rotisserie without the skin. The skin actually holds everything together. The cheesecloth and and wire will do well for you. Have you verified no butcher can get you full or half hogs with skin still on?

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Old 09-24-2011, 01:58 PM   #3
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You could try either cabbage or bananna leaves.

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Old 09-24-2011, 02:00 PM   #4
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You could try either cabbage or bananna leaves.
+1 for the banana leaves. I haven't personally tried cabbage, but banana yes. Helps keep it moister as well.
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Old 09-24-2011, 03:06 PM   #5
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If you can't find a pig with skin on it in Parkersburg West Virginia, you certainly won't find banana leaves!! I'm fairly confident you'll find what your looking for. You need to search out a hog farm, there are plenty of them around your area; definately some in Belpry across the river. Theyll gladly sell you a pig freshly killed.

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Old 09-24-2011, 07:03 PM   #6
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Well I've been looking for pig farmers for awhile now, the only one I could find that had any that would be ready, hasnt answered his phone since the first time I talked to him. Because of that, I've had to go to a local meat wholesaler who deals with local farmers personally. I'm getting the pig for about $140 from him, but he said that if I wanted it scalded it would cost over twice that because they don't have the equipment to scald them properly.

Now it just occurred to me, could I scald it myself and clean the hair off, or is that something that's difficult to do? I might be able to get him to give the pig to me gutted and ready to go, but leave the skin and everything on it, and I'll clean and scald it myself if its possible. Im not worried about working hard on it, but I don't know if it's something thats even possible for an at home person to do.

Thanks again

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Old 09-24-2011, 07:13 PM   #7
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I would assume that it would need to be done before it was gutted and processed.

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Old 09-24-2011, 07:14 PM   #8
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I worked as a butcher for a long time, from that experience I can tell you that if you can find a small time operation(family owned kind of deal) or a local meat processor they will be able to either get a pig for you - skin on - or direct you to a local farmer where you an get one.

scalding and scraping a big hog is not a fun job. its doable but without someone to help you through the process it can eat up a lot of your time. if you can get a hold of a big metal barrel place use that, fill with water half way, light a large fire under it and bring the water to around 170-180 degrees - dip the pig for about 30-45 seconds then lift out and scrape off the hair. The hot water helps the hair release.

you will need a tool like this:

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Old 09-24-2011, 07:18 PM   #9
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a quick googling revealed these places:
19th street meat market
and
Pioneer meat processing

Try them

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