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Old 07-30-2012, 03:19 PM   #1
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Default Pickle Recipe?

I'm sure a handful of users on here make their own pickles, so i figured I'd try my luck with a recipe recommendation...

I tried making deli style half sour pickles recently from a recipe I found googling. They were OK, but tasted like christmas. I'm assuming that's because the store-bought pickling spice has too much clove and cinnamon?

Anyways - I'm looking for a recipe for half sour or sour pickles.

Thanks!
Bryan

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Old 07-31-2012, 02:41 AM   #2
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I am interested in the responses you get. I just started pickling, myself, but I haven't yet tried sours. They are fermented and pickled, right? Or just pickled?

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Old 07-31-2012, 03:08 PM   #3
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are you talking vinegar pickles or lacto-ferment pickles? i haven't made lactic acid pickles since i used to help my mother when i was a kid, i loved them, am going to make them in a couple weeks. for vinegar pickles i use (homemade) cider vinegar, boiled briefly with sugar, salt, water, throw in garlic cloves, chilis and black peppercorns when it's still hot, pour over the cukes and add lots of dill, lots of onion slices, stick in in the fridge and wait a few weeks... i never add clove or cinnamon. sometimes mustard seed, would consider caraway or fennel seed.... i don't really measure anything, i think of it as a you can't go wrong sort of project, as long as it's highly acidic. i love em.

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Old 07-31-2012, 03:45 PM   #4
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I think sour pickles are lacto-fermented... the ones we get locally at the kosher places (Picklelicious is right down the street: www.picklelicious.com) seem to be that way. I've done a lot of pickles similar to your process, just with the exception that I end up canning them for non-fridge storage. And I generally throw in fennel seed. But a lacto-fermented pickle is quite a different animal, right?

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Old 07-31-2012, 04:09 PM   #5
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I might have to look into the lacto-fermemted pickles.. I absolutely love drinking pickle juice.. I make sure everyone in the house uses utensils when getting them so I can save the juice when I'm doing a hard job outside.. I like the harsh sour and that's kinda why I started making kombutcha a while back

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Old 07-31-2012, 04:16 PM   #6
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I've been doing lacto fermented pickled cukes. It's super easy! Just put pickling cukes in a bucket or crock, add a whole lot of peeled garlic cloves (say, 3 heads of garlic per 5 lbs of cukes). I add a few tsp of dill seed (not weed), some whole peppercorns, coriander, and mustard seeds. Cover with brine (3 tbsp salt per quart of water). Put a plate on top to push the cukes below the water, and loosely cover the whole deal to keep flies out. Don't refrigerate! After a few days, start tasting regularly until they are sour enough.

You'll get all kinds of terrifying scum on the surface of the brine. Skim off if you want -- just make sure the vegetables stay covered!

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Old 08-05-2012, 04:02 PM   #7
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Best damn dill pickles ever

Brine: 1 Quart apple cider vinegar (not apple cider flavored)
3 Quarts water
1 Cup pickling salt
Boil 5 minutes - Keep hot

Wash and cut off both ends of pickles.
Cut large ones in half lengthwise.

Drop 1 clove garlic
1 piece dill
1 little red pepper
Into bottom of sterilized jar and pack pickles into jar upright. Place in hot water to heat jars (very hot!) Fill with hot brine. Heat lids and seal. Turn the jars upside down for a little while so that the lids stay hot. Turn right side up and make sure they seal.

Wait 3 weeks

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Old 08-09-2012, 09:35 PM   #8
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I've been making a lot of vinegar pickles lately since my garden is overflowing with cucumbers, but I am going to try my hand at lacto crock pickles here in the next week or so as I just scored a 3 gallon ceramic crock. I have fond memories of being a kid and making pickles with my dad using a huge ceramic crock with the cucumbers weighted down in the brine with an overturned plate and a rock on top. I had mentioned my interest in making these traditional style pickles to my parents a few months back and was picking my Dad's brain for some of the details. To my great surprise this morning I got a phone call from my parents who are on vacation visiting family in NE PA. Lo and behold my parents happened to mention to my uncle yesterday that I was looking into making lacto pickles and he told them about a local ceramic crock factory that had reasonably priced crocks since here in the Midwest is pretty hard to find traditional ceramic crocks that don't cost an arm and a leg. The place where they went had discounted seconds that were miscolored so they scored me a 3 gallon crock for $20. It is supposed to arrive next Tuesday, so after that I will be a lacto pickle fool

After picking up the crock this morning my mom talked to my aunt who is the lacto pickle making fanatic of the family and she had some pointers that my mom relayed over the phone. I didn't have a pen at the time to write anything down, but I am supposed to call my aunt here for details this weekend. I will post up if I learn anything insightful. The one thing I did take away from the conversation was that my aunt puts grape leaves in the bottom of the crock to facilitate firmness. Nonetheless I will be on the hunt for some grape leaves over the next couple of days.

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Old 08-09-2012, 09:41 PM   #9
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I have been making hot, spicy, garlic pickles for years with a friend-combined 2 old family recipes and came up with this:

1 tsp mixed pickling spice
2 cloves garlic
1/8 tsp crushed red pepper
Fresh dill, or if unavailable, dried dill
Soak pickles in ice and water, pack pickles in jars
Mix 1 cup un-iodized salt (kosher, or canning salt) with 6 ½ quarts water, cold
In large pot until dissolved.
Use pitcher to pour water into jars, to top
Seal with lids and rings which you have boiled.
Lids should be tight.
Store in basement for 10 days and then refrigerate for 10 days before opening.
They will cure slowly.

These are awesome pickles! we make around 150 jars total and believe it or not they go pretty quickly. We only make them once per year and very rarely do we have any left as we get around to making them again!

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Old 08-10-2012, 04:49 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHefJohnboyardee View Post
Best damn dill pickles ever

Brine: 1 Quart apple cider vinegar (not apple cider flavored)
3 Quarts water
1 Cup pickling salt
Boil 5 minutes - Keep hot

Wash and cut off both ends of pickles.
Cut large ones in half lengthwise.

Drop 1 clove garlic
1 piece dill
1 little red pepper
Into bottom of sterilized jar and pack pickles into jar upright. Place in hot water to heat jars (very hot!) Fill with hot brine. Heat lids and seal. Turn the jars upside down for a little while so that the lids stay hot. Turn right side up and make sure they seal.

Wait 3 weeks
These are AR15 Pickles. But I agree these are the best pickles ever. Only thing I add to this recipe is a grape leaf in each jar to keep them crisp.
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