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Old 10-19-2012, 04:40 PM   #1
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Default Offal ideas [recipes and experience's with animal offal]

Starting this thread because it needs to be done. If there was ever a rival to my beer making hobby, cooking with offal would definitely be it. Below is my epic feast from a few days ago... Lets begin!

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Old 10-20-2012, 09:54 PM   #2
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looks good in the happy valley. but what is it all?? love me some offal

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Old 10-21-2012, 06:18 AM   #3
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looks good in the happy valley. but what is it all?? love me some offal
Foi gras, black truffle mousse, old fashioned chicken liver mousse, duck liver farce, aged goat cheese brought back from france and a reclette with crispy fried onions, cornichone and pink lady apples. To the left is aceato-honey cider jam (with shallots) whole grain mustard and cornichone. It went well with my hop bursted IIPA and some jeffersons. My lady stayed classy with an 05 melbec blend from our favorite California vineyard.
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Old 10-21-2012, 09:40 AM   #4
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No offense and there is nothing wrong with eating that stuff but I don't eat the guts!
I've had people ask me many times if I packed the liver and heart out when I bring something home from hunting, but I just don't eat that stuff.

I've eaten tung and heart a few times. A little will last me for a very long time, and I just don't like the taste of liver. Someone cooks up liver and onion and I scrape the liver off the plate and eat the onion.

When it comes to cheese, there are lots of types out there but I've never been one for the strong tastes and smells of most of the "non American standard" cheese varieties. I'll try a lot of things if the smell doesn't put me off, but in the end I stick to fairly standard stuff.

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Old 10-22-2012, 01:22 PM   #5
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looks awesome, sounds awesome!!
i'll post a platter on here in reply at some point

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Old 10-22-2012, 03:13 PM   #6
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looks awesome, sounds awesome!!
i'll post a platter on here in reply at some point
Sounds great.
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Old 10-23-2012, 01:58 PM   #7
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Chicken Hearts with Celery and Onions

1 lb. chicken hearts
3 large ribs celery- medium slices
1 rather small white or yellow onion (I suppose shallots would work as well)- minced
Shmaltz for sauteeing (I suppose you could use a mix of butter and olive oil)
adobo to taste
kosher salt and pepper to taste
White rice


First, rinse and quarter your hearts and shake out any blood. Soak for about an hour in salted water, and then rinse. Soak again in fresh unsalted water while you chop your onions and mince your celery.

Drain and pat dry with paper towels before rough chopping and seasoning liberally (the only way to season in New York *rimshot*) with adobo.

Heat your schmaltz and sautee your onions, seasoning with a little salt and pepper. Once they start to brown and get soft add your hearts and celery. Cook on high, shaking the pan occasionally. What you are going for is hearts that have a crispiness on the outside and are well cooked on the inside, and celery that is still crunchy and has "shrunk" a bit.

Serve over a bed of white rice that has been cooked with butter.
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Old 10-23-2012, 06:36 PM   #8
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Finally getting this thread moving in the right direction. Thank you.

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Old 10-23-2012, 07:24 PM   #9
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mm those do look good. I'm trying to get more into offal. I normally eat chicken and beef liver and heart, and beef and lamb kidneys. I haven't gotten very fancy with them though, I just am pleased to be able to eat some. I have some frozen packages of lamb 'sweetbreads' but I haven't had a chance to prepare them.

Lots of people say they would never eat offal, but the thing is traditionally they were highly valued, and oftentimes that's the first things animals go for in a kill, which to me says something about their nutritive value. Cookbooks like Nourishing Traditions have a pretty good number of recipes.

I picked up a copy of Adelle Davis' Let's Cook it Right cookbook for Amazon. I don't agree with everything in it, but she has a lot of interesting recipes including use of brains and other organs and glands. I found this cookbook on my mother's shelf one time and I was surprised how completely different it is than cookbooks today even though it isn't that old - it's from the 1940's.

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Old 10-24-2012, 05:45 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by porcupine73
mm those do look good. I'm trying to get more into offal. I normally eat chicken and beef liver and heart, and beef and lamb kidneys. I haven't gotten very fancy with them though, I just am pleased to be able to eat some. I have some frozen packages of lamb 'sweetbreads' but I haven't had a chance to prepare them.

Lots of people say they would never eat offal, but the thing is traditionally they were highly valued, and oftentimes that's the first things animals go for in a kill, which to me says something about their nutritive value. Cookbooks like Nourishing Traditions have a pretty good number of recipes.

I picked up a copy of Adelle Davis' Let's Cook it Right cookbook for Amazon. I don't agree with everything in it, but she has a lot of interesting recipes including use of brains and other organs and glands. I found this cookbook on my mother's shelf one time and I was surprised how completely different it is than cookbooks today even though it isn't that old - it's from the 1940's.
Sweet breads are one of my favorite things to eat! I like to poach them with lemon, thyme, onion, coriander and parsley. Then press them. Cut, flour then fry/saute them til crispy. Goes great with yam or sweet potato puree and pomegranate sauce (from the same animals stock) and fresh pomegranate.
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