Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Food and Beverage > Cooking & Pairing > The Home Made Pizza Thread

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-20-2013, 07:08 PM   #131
ChshreCat
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ChshreCat's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Camano Island, Washington
Posts: 11,257
Liked 457 Times on 363 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

__________________

"Science + beer = good!"
-Adam Savage

ChshreCat is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-21-2013, 09:58 PM   #132
theveganbrewer
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 1,937
Liked 291 Times on 207 Posts
Likes Given: 265

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JUST_BREW_IT View Post
would anyone be interested in sharing their process from beginning ( making of dough) to end ( actually cooking of pizza)?
This is for a very basic, wood-fired pizza dough. It will be bubbly, with lots of air bubbles in the dough, light and crispy. Very detailed process, but it's worth it if you want that traditional italian crust. Sometimes I add olive oil to the base, most of the time now.

Put the following into a large bowl:

7-3/4 cups of flour
3 cups of warm water at 95 degrees. (Set aside 1/4 cup in small separate container)

  • Mix roughly by hand, just until most of the flour has touched the water. Doesn't have to be pretty and can just be done with a wooden spoon at this point. Let sit, covered, for 30 minutes to autolyse.
  • Place 1/4 tsp of dry yeast into the 1/4 cup of water
  • After 30 minutes, sprinkle 1tbsp + 1tsp of salt into flour.
  • Stir in yeast mixture
  • Mix by hand, wetting hand to keep dough off of it. Knead and fold, pinch and reform till all the mixture is wet.
  • Let sit for 30 minutes covered then apply 2 folds to the dough. These will help create air pockets in final product. Wet hand and slip under dough, grab about half and stretch it up towards the top of the bowl until it's about to fall apart, then fold over the top of the dough. Repeat one more time from the other side. Cover and let rise for 12 hours or more.
  • Flour large surface and gently remove dough. Flour lightly on top and divide into 4-5 pieces. On a dry part of the counter, form into balls, lightly oil tops, and place on a floured baking sheet for further rising. After 1 hour, refrigerate for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

They will keep moist in plastic bags in the fridge for 2 days.
__________________

-Retired Homebrewer

theveganbrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-22-2013, 11:32 AM   #133
mtnagel
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 6 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 1,948
Liked 177 Times on 139 Posts
Likes Given: 164

Default

Can you scale that down? That's a lot of dough!

__________________
mtnagel is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-22-2013, 06:15 PM   #134
cheezydemon3
Registered User
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: louisville
Posts: 12,967
Liked 1639 Times on 1233 Posts
Likes Given: 3007

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtnagel View Post
Can you scale that down? That's a lot of dough!
....yes......scale it down...

I plan to post pics of the calzone tonight.

Calzones are NOT a fail or shortcut.

The ingredients steam, but not in water. They steam in the juices of all of the ingredients, resulting in a less maillard creation, but something awesome just the same.
__________________
cheezydemon3 is offline
headbanger Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-22-2013, 06:26 PM   #135
headbanger
Fast Loud Death
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
headbanger's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: The Hill, KY
Posts: 2,567
Liked 615 Times on 409 Posts
Likes Given: 1270

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheezydemon3 View Post

I plan to post pics of the calzone tonight.

Calzones are NOT a fail or shortcut.

The ingredients steam, but not in water. They steam in the juices of all of the ingredients, resulting in a less maillard creation, but something awesome just the same.
Oh it was tasty for sure, the only fail was that I went down to the grill with a pizza and came back up with a calzone instead.

Forgot to snap a pic but I made the best one (pizza) so far last night, starting to get the hang of the sourdough.
__________________
headbanger is offline
cheezydemon3 Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-22-2013, 07:38 PM   #136
cheezydemon3
Registered User
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: louisville
Posts: 12,967
Liked 1639 Times on 1233 Posts
Likes Given: 3007

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by headbanger View Post
Oh it was tasty for sure, the only fail was that I went down to the grill with a pizza and came back up with a calzone instead.

Forgot to snap a pic but I made the best one (pizza) so far last night, starting to get the hang of the sourdough.
Lol, I get it now!

May I get a little sourdough starter that weekend?

I alternately like pizza and calzone. Don't make the mistake of thinking that one or the other is better....

That is like saying that you LOVE ribeye and therefore NEVER have a bacon wrapped filet!!!!

Both are worthy.

And as you have witnessed, calzones take more skill. They need to be thin and uniform. Something nearly impossible with an overlapping seal, or else you get big bites of bread with NO stuff.


(Actually that thing looks AWESOME!!! I am jealous!!!)
__________________
cheezydemon3 is offline
headbanger Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-22-2013, 07:56 PM   #137
JUST_BREW_IT
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Central IL, Illinois
Posts: 429
Liked 43 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 16

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by theveganbrewer View Post
This is for a very basic, wood-fired pizza dough. It will be bubbly, with lots of air bubbles in the dough, light and crispy. Very detailed process, but it's worth it if you want that traditional italian crust. Sometimes I add olive oil to the base, most of the time now.

Put the following into a large bowl:

7-3/4 cups of flour
3 cups of warm water at 95 degrees. (Set aside 1/4 cup in small separate container)

  • Mix roughly by hand, just until most of the flour has touched the water. Doesn't have to be pretty and can just be done with a wooden spoon at this point. Let sit, covered, for 30 minutes to autolyse.
  • Place 1/4 tsp of dry yeast into the 1/4 cup of water
  • After 30 minutes, sprinkle 1tbsp + 1tsp of salt into flour.
  • Stir in yeast mixture
  • Mix by hand, wetting hand to keep dough off of it. Knead and fold, pinch and reform till all the mixture is wet.
  • Let sit for 30 minutes covered then apply 2 folds to the dough. These will help create air pockets in final product. Wet hand and slip under dough, grab about half and stretch it up towards the top of the bowl until it's about to fall apart, then fold over the top of the dough. Repeat one more time from the other side. Cover and let rise for 12 hours or more.
  • Flour large surface and gently remove dough. Flour lightly on top and divide into 4-5 pieces. On a dry part of the counter, form into balls, lightly oil tops, and place on a floured baking sheet for further rising. After 1 hour, refrigerate for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

They will keep moist in plastic bags in the fridge for 2 days.

Thank you!
__________________
JUST_BREW_IT is offline
theveganbrewer Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-23-2013, 12:55 AM   #138
headbanger
Fast Loud Death
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
headbanger's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: The Hill, KY
Posts: 2,567
Liked 615 Times on 409 Posts
Likes Given: 1270

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheezydemon3 View Post
Lol, I get it now!

May I get a little sourdough starter that weekend?

I alternately like pizza and calzone. Don't make the mistake of thinking that one or the other is better....

That is like saying that you LOVE ribeye and therefore NEVER have a bacon wrapped filet!!!!

Both are worthy.

And as you have witnessed, calzones take more skill. They need to be thin and uniform. Something nearly impossible with an overlapping seal, or else you get big bites of bread with NO stuff.


(Actually that thing looks AWESOME!!! I am jealous!!!)
Oh yeah, got you covered on the starter.

Calzone is awesome, but if you don't make it right all the good stuff leaks out.

Mine usually leak, I need to work on that too.
__________________
headbanger is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-23-2013, 01:07 AM   #139
headbanger
Fast Loud Death
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
headbanger's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: The Hill, KY
Posts: 2,567
Liked 615 Times on 409 Posts
Likes Given: 1270

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by reynolds5520 View Post
Hey Headbanger, my experiments with sourdough haven't been a great success yet either.

I have found that the mixing technique suggested by Varasano is an improvement. I put everything in the bread machine with about 25% of the flour set aside. Then I let the machine run through just the slow mix part of the dough cycle to combine everything into a very wet dough. When it kicks up the speed (after 9 minutes), I reset the machine to start again (timer delay start) in 15 minutes. When the machine restarts, I slowly add in the rest of the flour just before the end of the slow mix. It does take some effort with a spatula to get all the flour mixed in.


I have also tested a few different flours in a basic dough recipe. I heard good things about the Antimo Caputo Pizza Flour and it did make very good pizza, but not worth the extra cost to have it shipped in for me. I understand it may really shine when baked in a very hot oven. I am only baking at around 600F.

What I am using most often now is a 3:1 blend of bread flour and cake flour.
I've been playing with Wood's bread machine method. At first I was trying to take shortcuts and it wasn't working out too well. Now it's starting to fall into place, I've resigned to following his recipe too the T and, go figure, it works really well.

I have not tried Varasano's method yet with sourdough. If I can ever nail down this one I'm keen to try that with the KA mixer next.

Still just using bread flour here, does the addition of the cake flour really make a big difference in texture for you?
__________________
headbanger is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-23-2013, 02:33 AM   #140
reynolds5520
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Western Fingerlakes NY
Posts: 248
Liked 34 Times on 27 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

I still need to do a test with just the bread flour.

I know I prefer the results with the bread flour/cake flour blend over the all purpose flour I started with a few years ago. It seems to be easier to stretch and a softer crumb. It's possible that with the improved dough mixing/handling I've added to my workflow that most any flour would work.

__________________
reynolds5520 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
home made => home brew iambeer Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 10-08-2012 01:48 PM
Pizza Debate to go along wih Bagel thread. SourHopHead Cooking & Pairing 82 07-09-2008 11:58 PM
Home made kit for home made brew LouisianaKid Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 13 09-22-2007 05:26 PM