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Old 02-27-2013, 05:51 PM   #11
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I'm a chef by trade - Love Yucatecan cuisine!!

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Old 02-27-2013, 07:03 PM   #12
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I'm a chef by trade - Love Yucatecan cuisine!!
I'm a chef by desire

The mayan cafe has been there for years.

Awesome ceviche, awesome pork, lots of actually good lima beans
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:23 AM   #13
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Just made a variation of what I mentioned above with the mojo crillo, came out better that I imagined.

1.5# shrimp shelled and deveined
1/2 cup of Goya Mojo Crillo Marinade
1/2 medium onion finely diced
1/2 orange pepper diced
3 cloves garlic finely chopped
dry white wine to deglaze pan with
7 ounce can of Mexican tomato sauce with chilies
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1/4 tsp ground cominos
Chopped cilantro or parsley to garnish.

Marinaded the shrimp in the mojo grillo for an hour, separated the shrimp from the marinade and reserved it. Sweated down the peppers, onions and garlic. Deglazed with a splash of wine, added the tomato sauce, marinade and spices. Reduced by half. Tossed in the shrimp and let them cook til they changed color. Garnish with either cilantro or parsley. Served in a bowl with toasted garlic bread. But could be over rice as well.

You could give it more heat with habenero, or even just hot sauce, but the heat from the tomato/chili sauce was perfect for me.

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Old 02-28-2013, 02:41 AM   #14
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Tomato eh? Interesting.

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Old 03-06-2013, 05:59 PM   #15
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You mentioned this Mayan shrimp recipe, and my mind immediatley goes to:

Coney stock (am I the only one with rabbit in the freezer? Ok chicken, then)
half and half pineapple/orange juice (fresh of course)
ginger (fresh of course)
scallions (or maybe leeks even!)
garlic
either tomatoes (for rojo) or tomatillos (for verde)
ghost pepper or rocoto pepper.
For something a little less spicy...I'm thinking somethign peppery like thai peppers or something.

oh, and copious amounts of cilantro. for those who abhor cilantro, I'd substitute parsley.

Looks like I just found dinner. Thanks for the idea.

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Old 03-06-2013, 06:39 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Die_Yankees_Die View Post
You mentioned this Mayan shrimp recipe, and my mind immediatley goes to:

Coney stock (am I the only one with rabbit in the freezer? Ok chicken, then)
half and half pineapple/orange juice (fresh of course)
ginger (fresh of course)
scallions (or maybe leeks even!)
garlic
either tomatoes (for rojo) or tomatillos (for verde)
ghost pepper or rocoto pepper.
For something a little less spicy...I'm thinking somethign peppery like thai peppers or something.

oh, and copious amounts of cilantro. for those who abhor cilantro, I'd substitute parsley.

Looks like I just found dinner. Thanks for the idea.
You have coneys and rocoto peppers?? Where the hell do you live????

Sounds Awesome!

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Old 03-06-2013, 07:47 PM   #17
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I live in the heart of Detroit, MI!

All spicy/latin ingredients such as Rocoto peppers? Several Supermercados have them. Along with specialty meats like tongue and tripe and pig/beef head. Yum.

More exotic stuff like coneys? Thankfully the Muslim capital of the US is Dearborn, which borders Detroit. Off to the Dearborn Hillers for any kind of hillel meat you can imagine.

I made paprika/lime quail the other day. Word.

And I always keep a brace of coneys on hand for my famous leek 'n coney pot pie. They even sell them with the guts 'n gizzards and all for the gravy.

Detroit may have problems...but we have awesome food.

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Old 03-06-2013, 08:03 PM   #18
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I live in the heart of Detroit, MI!

All spicy/latin ingredients such as Rocoto peppers? Several Supermercados have them. Along with specialty meats like tongue and tripe and pig/beef head. Yum.

More exotic stuff like coneys? Thankfully the Muslim capital of the US is Dearborn, which borders Detroit. Off to the Dearborn Hillers for any kind of hillel meat you can imagine.

I made paprika/lime quail the other day. Word.

And I always keep a brace of coneys on hand for my famous leek 'n coney pot pie. They even sell them with the guts 'n gizzards and all for the gravy.

Detroit may have problems...but we have awesome food.
I'll say! We have good asian and indian grocers here, but nothing like that!

Your culinary expertise and your open minded love of food of any kind are obvious in your posts!

I grew rocotos with little success 3 years ago. Everything else did so well, I think I got weak seed. (even the good seeds are brown though, WIERD!)

You and creamygoodness (my alter ego) ought to talk. He regularly eats chicken hearts and livers.
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Old 03-06-2013, 08:05 PM   #19
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For me, when I try to emulate a lot of recipes that are hispanic/spanish or mexican in nature there is a factor that is often left out but makes a big difference.
It's the concept of high heat. When many of these dishes are made, they are flash cooked at very high temps. For example, I make shrimp dish that is spanish with shrimp, olive oil, garlic, salt, lemon juice,parsley, and smoked paprika. Now, if you combine the ingredients together and cook at moderate temps until shrimp are cooked you will get a decent dish that is ok. However, if you make the pan good and hot before adding the oil, then quick add the oil, garlic and shrimp so you get a carmelizing sear going. Then when the garlic is about to get overly brown, you slow it down with the lemon juice and paprika and maybe a little white wine, you'll get a great dish that has a roasty/carmelized flavor that is out of this world. Same with meat dishes where you cook the meat first. If you sear it and get a good amount of browning that will add flavor to the dish, versus making the meat grey and cooked with no additional flavoring.
It's often simple ingredients that are fresh and cooked well.

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Old 03-06-2013, 08:15 PM   #20
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It's the concept of high heat. When many of these dishes are made, they are flash cooked at very high temps.
Actually, many Mexican and Central American dishes rely on low and slow heat methods like braising, stewing, simmering, and pit-roasting at low temps. That is generally their style. The Chinese however like to cook very quickly with scorching hot Woks.

Preheating a pan before cooking is really a common sense practice. You rarely start anything in a cold pan, aside from something like a fatty duck breast that you want to slowly render out and not overcook or burn.
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