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Old 07-10-2012, 07:28 PM   #11
Proboscidea
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Not to be overly critical of everyone's helpful suggestions ... but here I go. It seems the recipes only use a little bit of spent grain; 4 cups at most. I was hoping there would be a way to use an entire batch's worth (without scaling up the recipe times a million, necessitating large quantities of the other ingredients, and not being able to give away a million batches of dog treats every time you brew).

I'm guessing there is no way to recycle an entire batch's worth of spent grain into edible human food. It's the hulls that are the problem, right? They have that straw-like quality that is not delicious in massive quantities. I'm wondering if the spent grain could be ground finely, maybe in a meat grinder type machine, so that the fibrous hulls are mashed into a non-straw-like powder, and the barley's endosperm & other tasty bits become a mush. Then you could spread the mush on several trays and bake at a low temp, then crumble, to make a sort of high-fiber cereal. Hmmmmm. I lack a barley-grinding mechanism for such an experiment. Anybody tried this, or something like it?

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Old 07-10-2012, 07:31 PM   #12
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I've done dog treats and bread, looking at pizza crusts and those cinnamon rolls look amazing.

I've also just eaten some straight from the mash tun, but they tend to get stuck in your teeth.

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Old 07-10-2012, 07:57 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Proboscidea View Post
Not to be overly critical of everyone's helpful suggestions ... but here I go. It seems the recipes only use a little bit of spent grain; 4 cups at most. I was hoping there would be a way to use an entire batch's worth (without scaling up the recipe times a million, necessitating large quantities of the other ingredients, and not being able to give away a million batches of dog treats every time you brew).

I'm guessing there is no way to recycle an entire batch's worth of spent grain into edible human food. It's the hulls that are the problem, right? They have that straw-like quality that is not delicious in massive quantities. I'm wondering if the spent grain could be ground finely, maybe in a meat grinder type machine, so that the fibrous hulls are mashed into a non-straw-like powder, and the barley's endosperm & other tasty bits become a mush. Then you could spread the mush on several trays and bake at a low temp, then crumble, to make a sort of high-fiber cereal. Hmmmmm. I lack a barley-grinding mechanism for such an experiment. Anybody tried this, or something like it?
The thing is, if you've made beer with them you've (hopefully) extracted almost all the sugar, so there isn't much nutrition left but fiber. They're pretty bland in fact (although I made a Belgian Dark Strong and ended up with 60% efficiency so the spent grains were still tasty!). That's why they use them as filler when feeding livestock. So I guess you could use all of it in one go, but it probably won't taste too great...
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Old 07-10-2012, 08:40 PM   #14
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There's still some starch left over. You could probably dry it out and run it through a flour mill and at least cut plain white flour with your spent grain flour to get a different texture and flavor.

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Old 07-11-2012, 02:26 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by ReverseApacheMaster
There's still some starch left over. You could probably dry it out and run it through a flour mill and at least cut plain white flour with your spent grain flour to get a different texture and flavor.
When I make bread there is usually a cup or two of grain in a large loaf, its enough to give some flavor, and a lot of awesome texture, but I usually throw about 8oz of homebrew in too. Beer bread with beer grains, can't beat it.
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Old 07-11-2012, 11:44 PM   #16
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I typically take about half of my grist (6lbs of grain) and throw it in my dehydrator and run it on low for about 48 hours until the grain becomes really dry. Ive made cookies, bread, granola, and pancakes with the dried grain (its much easier to store and cook with when its dry). I am going to try running it through the mill again after its dried out to help separate the husks but Ive found a small mesh strainer works pretty well too! After separating it from the husks I believe it will be much easier to cook with and Ill try a few more things. The bread is turning out pretty well as well as the pancakes but the granola and cookies still have a ways to go. Let me know if you'd like any of the recipes!

Cheers

Andrew

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Old 07-23-2012, 02:09 AM   #17
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The spent grain must be free of hops to be fed to dogs...Chickens,Pigs, goats love it...

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