Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Food and Beverage > Cooking & Pairing > Cooking Ribs on a Charcoal Weber Grill
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-05-2008, 06:02 PM   #1
BearsWickedBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 197
Default Cooking Ribs on a Charcoal Weber Grill

I want to attempt this over the weekend. Based on what I've read online...I should separate my grill into 4 sections...top left: ribs, bottom left: pan for drippings, top right: pan filled w/ water (to keep moisture), bottom right: charcoal (and maybe some wood chips)

Cook @ about 225degrees for 3 - 4 hours.

...does anybody have any tips? or could comment based on experience?

__________________
BearsWickedBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-05-2008, 06:32 PM   #2
Tenchiro
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Tenchiro's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Providence, RI
Posts: 2,963
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I always put all the coals on one side of the grill, a pan full of water in the middle but on the same grate as the coals. Open the dampers above the coals and position the vent on the top over your meat, which is opposite of the coals so that the smoke blows across the meat and then out the top.

I generally keep a squirt bottle of apple juice handy to keep everything moist and flavorful, if you have it on mist it won't disturb the dry rub. You should be able to adjust the top vent to keep the temps low and if you are good with the moist smoking wood that should help keep the temp down as well. You may need to refill the pan of water once or twice too.

__________________
Tenchiro is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-05-2008, 06:48 PM   #3
EdWort
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
EdWort's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Bee Cave, Texas
Posts: 11,967
Liked 265 Times on 138 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Indirect is the way to go for the first 3 hours or so. The Apple juice spritzer like Tenchiro mentions is helpful too.

Here's a good tip. After about 3 hours, take some foil and sprinkle some brown sugar and drizzle some honey on it, lay the ribs down in it repeat on top of the slab before completely wrapping in foil. Then cook your slab like that still indirect for another hour. Unwrapp and put direct over coals for a short time to brown things up a bit.

You'll be good to go.

EdWort is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-05-2008, 07:30 PM   #4
Soperbrew
Who rated my beer?
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Soperbrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Posts: 2,625
Liked 67 Times on 66 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

I do my baby backs for closer to 5 hrs at 220-225F unfoiled & they turn out great. Many people subscribe to the 2-2-1 method. 2 hrs unfoiled, 2 hrs foiled, then 1 hr unfoiled. 3-2-1 for spares.

The other replies will work well also. Just be sure the heat is indirect.

__________________
Soperbrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-05-2008, 07:44 PM   #5
Turkeyfoot Jr.
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Turkeyfoot Jr.'s Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 364
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I did ribs a lot on my 22" Weber. I would pack a chimney's worth of charcoal into one side and lay the ribs on the other. 2.5 hours unwrapped followed by 2.5 hours wrapped in foil. I found that the ribs browned up enough during the first 2.5 hours that there was no need to unwrap and put them back on the grill.

__________________
Primary: EMPTY!
Primary: EMPTY!
Primary: EMPTY!
Primary: EMPTY!
Bottled:
Kegged: Turkeyfoot English Mild
Turkeyfoot Jr. is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-05-2008, 07:55 PM   #6
BearsWickedBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 197
Default

Thanks for the all replies.

One concern I have is temp control. I have a bag of hardwood coal so they are all different shapes and sizes and in cooking with this in the past I've noticed big differences in temperatures. I'm thinking I will need to pick up a bag of kingsford. I do have a chimney....to maintain temperature....I could get any additional coals ready in the chimney and then add them to the fire?? Is this normal? I dont anticipate one batch of coals lasting me 3 hours or so. I would guess if i put too much..it will be too hot @ first...too little and the heat wont last that long.

__________________
BearsWickedBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-05-2008, 07:57 PM   #7
BlindLemonLars
Conqueroo Brew
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BlindLemonLars's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 4,445
Liked 10 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 31

Default

Unbelievable...five homebrewers talking about cooking ribs, and not a one of you has joined the Grilling & Chilling group!

__________________
BlindLemonLars is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-05-2008, 10:27 PM   #8
Soperbrew
Who rated my beer?
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Soperbrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Posts: 2,625
Liked 67 Times on 66 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BearsWickedBrew View Post
Thanks for the all replies.

One concern I have is temp control. I have a bag of hardwood coal so they are all different shapes and sizes and in cooking with this in the past I've noticed big differences in temperatures. I'm thinking I will need to pick up a bag of kingsford. I do have a chimney....to maintain temperature....I could get any additional coals ready in the chimney and then add them to the fire?? Is this normal? I dont anticipate one batch of coals lasting me 3 hours or so. I would guess if i put too much..it will be too hot @ first...too little and the heat wont last that long.
I've used the chimney technique before and it works. I just don't like the extra work involved so I just throw a few coals on top every once in awhile. As long as you're not adding too many coals at once you're fire should be ok. I'm assuming you're using natural lump & not the chemically saturated stuff.
__________________
Soperbrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-05-2008, 11:49 PM   #9
BearsWickedBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 197
Default

^^I will probably pick up your standard bag of kingsford- that blue & white bag. I think this is natural lump. I won't be using "match light?"...which is that kingsford red and black bag that is pretreated w/ lighter fluid.

__________________
BearsWickedBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2008, 05:56 AM   #10
Soperbrew
Who rated my beer?
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Soperbrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Posts: 2,625
Liked 67 Times on 66 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

Not a big fan of the standard kingsford briquettes for smoking long term. Too many chemicals used in making those things. My Advice is to go with natural wood lump charcoal (any brand) for starters. Then experiment from there. Please don't use kingsford briquettes for a long term smoke. bad bad idea.

__________________
Soperbrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
WSM Weber Smokey Mountain for sale @ Amazon amishland Cooking & Pairing 3 06-07-2009 03:06 PM
Gas Grill vs. Charcoal brauhaus General Chit Chat 47 05-10-2009 03:49 AM
Gas or charcoal? SixFoFalcon Cooking & Pairing 48 03-08-2008 11:47 PM
Weber gas kettle for brewing? PeteOz77 Equipment/Sanitation 1 01-23-2008 10:28 PM