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dfess1 12-03-2012 12:32 AM

2 Attachment(s)

Part Pieces Width Height Thickness
Side (A) 2 17.25” 11” .5”
End (B) 2 11.25 11” .5”
Bottom (C) 1 16.75” 11.25” .25”
Short Divider (D) 5 10.75” 4” .25”
Long Divider (E) 3 16.25” 4” .25”
Top (F) 1 17” 11.25” .25”

Construction:

1. From .5” Baltic Birch, cut and label parts A, and B.

2. From .25” Baltic Birch, cut and label parts C, D, E, and F.
NOTE: Using a 1” forstner bit, drill a hole 2” from one end and 5.625” from one edge of part F.

3. Make the handles. On parts B, using a 1.5” forstner bit, drill a hole 2.25” from the top, at 5.625” from the outside edge. Drill another hole 2.25” from the top, at 3.625” from the same outside edge. Drill one more hole 2.25” from the top, at 7.625” from the same outside edge. Drill overlapping holes to clean up the edges.
NOTE: A cleaner edge will be obtained if a template is used. Make the template to the same dimensions listed above. Drill the holes in parts B in the same manner as described in above, but with a 1.375” forstner bit. Then place the template over part B, and using a flush cut bit in your router, trim up the hole.

4. Using a dado blade, cut a .25” deep by .5” wide rabbit/shoulder on the ends of part A.

5. Without changing the dado blade height, set the dado blade to be .25”, and cut a dado slot .25” from the bottom of parts A and B on the inside face of each part. Flip each piece around and cut the same dado slot in the top of each piece. Take one part B per case, and flip it over and cut off the top dado.

6. Dry fit parts A, B, and C. Make any adjustments to ensure that all parts fit snugly.

7. Once the handle cavity is cleaned up, put a .25” roundover bit in your router, and route both faces of the handle.

8. Glue up the ends of parts A and B, and assemble them along with part C. Tack a 1” brad through part B into part A.

9. Create the dividers as explained in initial post.


As we create the other cases, I'll post up the cut list for those. Construction will be the same, dimensions will differ. For this go around, I purchased three .5" sheets and four .25" sheets. This created 15 crates. Baltic Birch plywood comes in 60" x 60" sheets, not your typical 4' x 8'.


dfess1 12-03-2012 12:32 AM

2 Attachment(s)

Part Pieces Width Height Thickness
Side (A) 2 17.25” 11” .5”
End (B) 2 11.25 11” .5”
Bottom (C) 1 16.75” 11.25” .25”
Short Divider (D) 5 10.75” 4” .25”
Long Divider (E) 3 16.25” 4” .25”
Top (F) 1 17” 11.25” .25”

Construction:

1. From .5” Baltic Birch, cut and label parts A, and B.

2. From .25” Baltic Birch, cut and label parts C, D, E, and F.
NOTE: Using a 1” forstner bit, drill a hole 2” from one end and 5.625” from one edge of part F.

3. Make the handles. On parts B, using a 1.5” forstner bit, drill a hole 2.25” from the top, at 5.625” from the outside edge. Drill another hole 2.25” from the top, at 3.625” from the same outside edge. Drill one more hole 2.25” from the top, at 7.625” from the same outside edge. Drill overlapping holes to clean up the edges.
NOTE: A cleaner edge will be obtained if a template is used. Make the template to the same dimensions listed above. Drill the holes in parts B in the same manner as described in above, but with a 1.375” forstner bit. Then place the template over part B, and using a flush cut bit in your router, trim up the hole.

4. Using a dado blade, cut a .25” deep by .5” wide rabbit/shoulder on the ends of part A.

5. Without changing the dado blade height, set the dado blade to be .25”, and cut a dado slot .25” from the bottom of parts A and B on the inside face of each part. Flip each piece around and cut the same dado slot in the top of each piece. Take one part B per case, and flip it over and cut off the top dado.

6. Dry fit parts A, B, and C. Make any adjustments to ensure that all parts fit snugly.

7. Once the handle cavity is cleaned up, put a .25” roundover bit in your router, and route both faces of the handle.

8. Glue up the ends of parts A and B, and assemble them along with part C. Tack a 1” brad through part B into part A.

9. Create the dividers as explained in initial post.


As we create the other cases, I'll post up the cut list for those. Construction will be the same, dimensions will differ. For this go around, I purchased three .5" sheets and four .25" sheets. This created 15 crates. Baltic Birch plywood comes in 60" x 60" sheets, not your typical 4' x 8'.


dfess1 12-03-2012 02:52 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtd_419 View Post
That is a great cutlist and very precise directions. Anyone that can run the necessary tools should have no problem making these. I think I'll be making quite a few myself.

Thank you for the plans.
No Problem. And you are correct, they really aren't hard to make at all. With the simple joinery, you didn't even need any clamps to draw them together. Like I said, we just used the small brads to tack them together, act as clamps themselves as the glue dried. If you wanted to go without brads, a couple clamps would be all you need.

Really just need a router and a flush trim bit, as well as a roundover bit, a table saw with a rip/crosscut/combo blade (depending on how many times you like to change blades), and a dado set. Then again, if you have a good fence and a table mounted router table, you could make the dado cuts with a router bit as well, all depends on how you want to skin that cat. The dado blade option was easier in my opinion.

After making all of those, the only thing I would suggest doing differently, make the dado groove along the top edge of the pieces a hair wider than .25". Out of the 15 boxes we made, only 5 of them weren't deadnuts flat when glued up. The back end on the 5 in question was either a touch high or a touch low, causing the dado grooved to not be totally lined up. In either case, the top was not able to slide all the way into that groove. So we cheated there and ripped the .25" of the top (part F) that was over hanging the end of the crate, since there was no way to go back and fix the mistake at that point. Perhaps better care when putting them together would have caught that in the first place, but then again, I was trying to get all 15 assembled and finished in one day, as the older gentlemen seen in the pictures had stuff to do and I would be loosing my man power in short order. Either way, whether it did slide all the way back or not, didn't really matter. It keeps light out. We do know for next time to make sure they get lined up though.

Another thing we learned: My forstner bits are a set of cheap Chinese bits from Woodcraft, that came with my drill press. I don't use them enough to have warranted a new set yet. That said, we had to drill ALOT of holes to take out the bulk of the waste for the handles. When we first started out, the cuts were coming out fine. As the bit dulled, and more of my sacrificial table had more taken out (from an over zealous driller), we started to get alot of tearout. To remedy this, start on one side of the face, and drill your holes halfway or a little short of halfway down. Flip the piece over and drill both ends of the handle first (all the way through now) and then finish up with the overlapping in the middle. THis made for a much better/cleaner hole, and virtually no tearout after trimming it up with the flush trim bit. Any tearout we had on the other handles, we just made sure that they were the inside face that you wouldn't really see.

Lastly, the directions call for a .5" wide dado cut that would accept the ends. Keep in mind this is a rough size. Baltic Birch actually comes in mm sizing. You just have to use the .5" as an estimate, and use some scrap pieces until the dado width will cover up the ends. It helps to have a long piece of MDF that you can clamp to a fence, and the bring the edge of your dado blade up into from underneath. It buries the blade in the sacrifical fence.

dfess1 12-03-2012 02:52 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtd_419 View Post
That is a great cutlist and very precise directions. Anyone that can run the necessary tools should have no problem making these. I think I'll be making quite a few myself.

Thank you for the plans.
No Problem. And you are correct, they really aren't hard to make at all. With the simple joinery, you didn't even need any clamps to draw them together. Like I said, we just used the small brads to tack them together, act as clamps themselves as the glue dried. If you wanted to go without brads, a couple clamps would be all you need.

Really just need a router and a flush trim bit, as well as a roundover bit, a table saw with a rip/crosscut/combo blade (depending on how many times you like to change blades), and a dado set. Then again, if you have a good fence and a table mounted router table, you could make the dado cuts with a router bit as well, all depends on how you want to skin that cat. The dado blade option was easier in my opinion.

After making all of those, the only thing I would suggest doing differently, make the dado groove along the top edge of the pieces a hair wider than .25". Out of the 15 boxes we made, only 5 of them weren't deadnuts flat when glued up. The back end on the 5 in question was either a touch high or a touch low, causing the dado grooved to not be totally lined up. In either case, the top was not able to slide all the way into that groove. So we cheated there and ripped the .25" of the top (part F) that was over hanging the end of the crate, since there was no way to go back and fix the mistake at that point. Perhaps better care when putting them together would have caught that in the first place, but then again, I was trying to get all 15 assembled and finished in one day, as the older gentlemen seen in the pictures had stuff to do and I would be loosing my man power in short order. Either way, whether it did slide all the way back or not, didn't really matter. It keeps light out. We do know for next time to make sure they get lined up though.

Another thing we learned: My forstner bits are a set of cheap Chinese bits from Woodcraft, that came with my drill press. I don't use them enough to have warranted a new set yet. That said, we had to drill ALOT of holes to take out the bulk of the waste for the handles. When we first started out, the cuts were coming out fine. As the bit dulled, and more of my sacrificial table had more taken out (from an over zealous driller), we started to get alot of tearout. To remedy this, start on one side of the face, and drill your holes halfway or a little short of halfway down. Flip the piece over and drill both ends of the handle first (all the way through now) and then finish up with the overlapping in the middle. THis made for a much better/cleaner hole, and virtually no tearout after trimming it up with the flush trim bit. Any tearout we had on the other handles, we just made sure that they were the inside face that you wouldn't really see.

Lastly, the directions call for a .5" wide dado cut that would accept the ends. Keep in mind this is a rough size. Baltic Birch actually comes in mm sizing. You just have to use the .5" as an estimate, and use some scrap pieces until the dado width will cover up the ends. It helps to have a long piece of MDF that you can clamp to a fence, and the bring the edge of your dado blade up into from underneath. It buries the blade in the sacrifical fence.

Concho 12-25-2012 05:20 PM

4 Attachment(s)

I've made a few changes to the design with most the credit to a buddy of mine (thanks Mike). This is a crate for my dad for christmas. It's not finished yet but here it is for right now, I'll post the finished project later.


Concho 12-25-2012 05:20 PM

4 Attachment(s)

I've made a few changes to the design with most the credit to a buddy of mine (thanks Mike). This is a crate for my dad for christmas. It's not finished yet but here it is for right now, I'll post the finished project later.


Concho 12-25-2012 05:20 PM

4 Attachment(s)

I've made a few changes to the design with most the credit to a buddy of mine (thanks Mike). This is a crate for my dad for christmas. It's not finished yet but here it is for right now, I'll post the finished project later.


Concho 12-25-2012 05:20 PM

4 Attachment(s)

I've made a few changes to the design with most the credit to a buddy of mine (thanks Mike). This is a crate for my dad for christmas. It's not finished yet but here it is for right now, I'll post the finished project later.


Concho 01-02-2013 05:55 PM

5 Attachment(s)

Finally finished (got off my rear). Just got to figure out how to put my label on the lid.


Concho 01-02-2013 05:55 PM

5 Attachment(s)

Finally finished (got off my rear). Just got to figure out how to put my label on the lid.



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