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Old 06-08-2012, 06:26 PM   #21
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Even though Golddiggie's requests for advice are just rhetorical
no doubt
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Old 06-08-2012, 06:30 PM   #22
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I correct as many as I can while using my phone to post. Even those few that slipped through are extremely minor to what MANY posters normally put up and never bother to correct. So get over it.

I posted to see if someone has done this before. NOT asking for advise on what else to use. If people would actually read, and comprehend before posting a lot of feeling (theirs, not mine) would be saved.

I know a keg can be made longer since I've seen the results. Was looking to see if anyone had actually done it yet.

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Old 06-08-2012, 07:35 PM   #23
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I correct as many as I can while using my phone to post. Even those few that slipped through are extremely minor to what MANY posters normally put up and never bother to correct. So get over it.

I posted to see if someone has done this before. NOT asking for advise on what else to use. If people would actually read, and comprehend before posting a lot of feeling (theirs, not mine) would be saved.

I know a keg can be made longer since I've seen the results. Was looking to see if anyone had actually done it yet.
I would be more than happy to include references to a few of your 2nd grade teacher red correction pen posts for spelling errors more minor than the ones in your post I quoted.

I don't know what I have to 'get over'. If you don't like the favor returned, maybe you have something to 'get over'.

You included in your initial post that you are using it for a mash tun, and therefore got responses as to why it would not make a good mash tun. You also got several posts about time, expense, difficulties, etc. of attempting this. You chose, as usual, to dismiss all advice as unimportant and off topic, along with a bit of derision.

Maybe next time you request advice, just post what it is you want to do, and not why you want to do it. Your initial post in this case would then turn into- Can you weld two guaranteed to be slightly imperfect and different sized cylinders together?
You would then get the responses you are seeking which would be - Given enough time and money, yes.

If you include that these cylinders were 1000 soda pop cans you are planning on turning into a very tall MLT, you are sure to get responses regarding the application, even if you include that you really like the convoluted bottom of the pop can for MLT purposes.

This is a recurring theme of yours- request advice for your 'new' solution to a problem that has already been 'definitively' solved, then dismiss all advice regarding the vetted solution in favor of your own Rube Goldbergian one.

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I know a keg can be made longer since I've seen the results. Was looking to see if anyone had actually done it yet.
Maybe you should read your own posts more carefully. You say you have already seen two kegs welded together, and then want to know if anyone has done it? Your request would actually make sense if you were truly open to advice that it isn't worth the time/effort, but, as mentioned before, your requests for advice/input are merely rhetorical. You appear hell bent on completing whatever project you dream up, regardless of feedback as to its feasibility.
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Old 06-08-2012, 08:11 PM   #24
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If you include that these cylinders were 1000 soda pop cans you are planning on turning into a very tall MLT
I actually attempted this, but found the vertical force of the mash caused the welds to give and the sides to buckle. Back to the drawing board....
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Old 06-08-2012, 08:20 PM   #25
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One: you are going to have to get a commercial welder with a plasma cutter and tig welder to do the job.
Two: unless you got the kegs for dirt cheap, like $20 at a yard sale, there are other alternatives.
Three: Why I am even wasting my time to tell you this, considering you are rude to everyone trying to help is beyond me.
Fourth: No, No one has done this because it is stupid. simply split your grain and, have two mash tuns and run them at the same time.

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Old 06-08-2012, 08:22 PM   #26
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I actually attempted this, but found the vertical force of the mash caused the welds to give and the sides to buckle. Back to the drawing board....
I reject your experience. I will find a welder with more skill than yours, regardless of cost. Perhaps I will add some platinum coated titanium reinforcement as well. I must have the convoluted dish bottom that fits my custom dixie cup false bottom and the extreme mash bed height/pressures.

Is there anyone who has done this, and actually done it 'the right way'? I don't care to read about failures, or feasibility studies to the contrary.
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Old 06-08-2012, 11:36 PM   #27
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I love this thread, so much time wasted without any usefull advice, this is not rocket science or difficult to do with a water surround level.

With a wash tub or kiddies pool you set keg inside and level in both axis by shimming with washers.
Add water to desired cut elevation, mark water line with #2 pencil 2" apart.
Pull from the water and use card stock or flexible ruler to connect marks with sharpie.
Cut 1/8" above mark with cut off disk in grinder.
Switch to grind/flap disk and grind back to sharpie mark
Use 1/4" plywood over opening to find high/low areas and finish grind flat, and do not bother with burrs on inside as they should be consumed during welding.
Welding is fairly simple with even cuts and minimal gaps, solar flux back sides without purge, or Argon purge inside.

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Old 06-09-2012, 01:25 AM   #28
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With a wash tub or kiddies pool you set keg inside and level in both axis by shimming with washers.
Add water to desired cut elevation, mark water line with #2 pencil 2" apart.
You are forgetting to account for the curvature of the surface of the water in the pool due to earth's gravity, not to mention the additional error induced by the changing tidal forces while performing the marking. I suppose if you marked them on successive days during the same tidal cycle, and made sure to invert the second keg while marking it, you could then just spin them 180 degrees from their marking orientations.

I don't think anyone thought it was an impossible task, or even a difficult one. Just one that, for the intended application, had better solutions from a time, money, and resulting performance aspect.

If cutting by hand with a grinder anyway, using a tight string will get the line close enough for the initial cut. Stacking them and grinding the high spots can get them fitted close enough for the welder.

The real problem are the issues caused by the resulting geometry, the least of which is the depth of the MLT exceeding the length of the average human arm by ~12". Most mash paddles, too. This will make cleaning and stirring difficult. The resulting height may also cause grain bed issues.
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Old 06-09-2012, 02:20 AM   #29
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I really enjoy the response, it was better than I hoped for, I really would like to see what a cut with string line result would be when welded together. Have you cut and converted kegs before?.

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Old 06-09-2012, 03:16 AM   #30
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I really enjoy the response, it was better than I hoped for
I am glad you liked it. I enjoyed writing it. While your method bordered on overkill (even specifying the grade of pencil to be used for marking), I felt compelled to push it over the edge.

I have not used the string method on a keg, but have on other smooth walled cylindrical things. It gets it close enough, especially if having to hand fit them is inevitable anyway, as it would be even using your water level method. The time saved not having to go buy the kiddie pool, perform a 2 axes level (twice), mark, and then play connect the dots, can be put towards any extra hand fit up caused by using the string.

Also, if you use the keg chimes as the level reference with your method, the cut will only be as square as the chime is. So, with a used keg, no chance, and even with a new keg, not very. Same goes for using the keg wall as a reference. This project will require hand fit up no matter which way you approach the initial cut.

Even easier is to just go off one of the existing reference marks on the keg like an existing weld line, or one of the reinforcing corrugations.

I don't see a welder paste fluxing an entire keg seam for $40 as the OP is guessing. Backgassing the weld is problematic due to the likelihood of the welder having a set of plugs for a keg being very low, and the volume of the keg being very high if the top was just taped shut. The resulting Argon bill would easily push the price past $40. The sugaring on the back of an unshielded weld isn't a sanitation issue for an MLT, but if it decides to start rusting it will add some prep time to each brew day.

I think you have missed the point everyone else already got- there is no real desire for any advice. Just go look at the OP's other threads like the one on sanke fermenting. No matter how many people explained how drilling and installing a corny post in the keg was unnecessary, and that the equipment he already possessed did all he needed, he endeavored to persevere along his chosen path.
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