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Old 01-09-2010, 08:56 PM   #1
bkloos
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Default Welding Questions (Technical)

Hey guys,

I'm about to start welding up my brew pots, and would like to know what you use for settings during the weld. This will be my first attempt at welding in couplers....

I have a Miller Maxstar 150 with 3/32", 1/16" and .040" electrodes and 1/16th 308 rod.

I'm wondering what amperage you use for this application?

The pot is a 16 gauge, 20 gallon mega pot.

Thanks Guys,

Bryan

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Old 01-09-2010, 09:14 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by bkloos View Post
Hey guys,

I'm about to start welding up my brew pots, and would like to know what you use for settings during the weld. This will be my first attempt at welding in couplers....

I have a Miller Maxstar 150 with 3/32", 1/16" and .040" electrodes and 1/16th 308 rod.

I'm wondering what amperage you use for this application?

The pot is a 16 gauge, 20 gallon mega pot.

Thanks Guys,

Bryan
I would suggest that before you jump in with both feet that you don't little practice.

I use 180 Square Wave with 0.040 or 1/16 tungsten with 1/16 filler and set at 48 amps but with a foot control to vary. Thats on a keg and ss coupler. Ark to coupler first and than down and add filler. Watch it for it can blow a hole in the keg.

But again I would find some scrap the same thickness and run a few beads before jumping off the deep end.

Might add to back flow the weld with argon.


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Old 01-09-2010, 09:28 PM   #3
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Default I have a couple of charts to help you out with TIG welding

They are both in PDF form but I can't upload them on here. This forum only allows a PDF under 19.5 kb. PM me your email and I can email them for you.

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Old 01-09-2010, 09:33 PM   #4
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Thanks Swagman,

I just went out and purchased the pieces to split my argon line so I can back-gas, so I am set there...

I will run a couple practice beads on some scrap before attempting the kettle. I don't want to end up with swiss cheese!

I was wondering about the actual weld process. You suggest I arc on the coupler, ramp up the heat to form a puddle, and then walk the puddle up to to the joint and begin filling? This is what I imagined doing, as the coupler is much thicker than the kettle.

How much of the circumference do you weld in one run. I was thinking about doing each coupler in 90 degrees (1/4 circle). This way I am always on top of the weld and not encountering any strange wrist angles.

I have a finger controll so I don't like to keep the work and my torch at easy angles so I can still control the amps and keep steady.... I need a foot switch!

Thanks,

Bryan

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Old 01-09-2010, 10:12 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by bkloos View Post
Thanks Swagman,

I just went out and purchased the pieces to split my argon line so I can back-gas, so I am set there...

I will run a couple practice beads on some scrap before attempting the kettle. I don't want to end up with swiss cheese!

I was wondering about the actual weld process. You suggest I arc on the coupler, ramp up the heat to form a puddle, and then walk the puddle up to to the joint and begin filling? This is what I imagined doing, as the coupler is much thicker than the kettle.

How much of the circumference do you weld in one run. I was thinking about doing each coupler in 90 degrees (1/4 circle). This way I am always on top of the weld and not encountering any strange wrist angles.

I have a finger controll so I don't like to keep the work and my torch at easy angles so I can still control the amps and keep steady.... I need a foot switch!

Thanks,

Bryan
Bryan

Couplers like to move from the heat so I do the four point on the clock 12, 6, 3, 9 and than hook them them up. After the 12 I straight the coupler a little.

Good luck

Dominus Vobiscum

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Old 01-10-2010, 02:44 AM   #6
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Thanks Swagman,

I just went out and purchased the pieces to split my argon line so I can back-gas, so I am set there...Please do the test welds. A regulator is only going to put out the set amount of gas. Gas and air flow like water, they will take the path of least resistance. (I remember your coments in another thread)

I will run a couple practice beads on some scrap before attempting the kettle. I don't want to end up with swiss cheese!Again, the test will be about gas coverage.

I was wondering about the actual weld process. You suggest I arc on the coupler, ramp up the heat to form a puddle, and then walk the puddle up to to the joint and begin filling? This is what I imagined doing, as the coupler is much thicker than the kettle.I too recomend this. I would get the puddle on the keg/pot and the focus the heat on the coupler. The puddle will flow up to the area you need it. You can move the heat if you need too.

How much of the circumference do you weld in one run. I was thinking about doing each coupler in 90 degrees (1/4 circle). This way I am always on top of the weld and not encountering any strange wrist angles. Your the weldor. Run the bead as far as you are comfortable with. Even if it is just a couple of dips with the filler wire. Remember the coupler will get hot, so it wont be much of a hand rest.

I have a finger controll so I don't like to keep the work and my torch at easy angles so I can still control the amps and keep steady.... I need a foot switch!

Thanks,

Bryan

I can't say for sure what amp setting I run. The controll of a TIG machine is the beauty of it. I would guess to set your maxstar at 70 amps. I run the maxstar 200 at work every day all day. Nice machines, they just lack the AC mode. I like 1/16" tungsten. I have welded down to .010" with it. I like it better then .040" tungsten, even down that thin. I also like a more thin filler wire. I like .020 or .025 for filler. I like to be able to watch the puddle fill up as I add it. This aslo helps out quite a bit with heat of the puddle. It wont suck as much life out of it making it easier to controll. I hope this helps and good luck.


Just for kicks, here is a shot or razor blades. They are .010" thick at the main section, but as you see I welded the cutting edges together. This is with 1/16" tungsten. Enjoy.
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Old 01-10-2010, 01:39 PM   #7
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Thanks again guys for all the advice!!!

I will run a bunch of practice beads today (may even give the razor blades a shot!!!) and report back later.

I hear you about the gas lines... I noticed the flow diference from my back-gas line compared to the torch line b/c of the increased resistance of the long tubing. I plan on cutting it shorter in an attempt to roughly equalize the flow rates to the front and back. From there it will be a test of getting the total pressure up enough to run a clean weld... Time will tell.

Lastly, a question I've never asked. How do you guys like to clean and prep the surface before and after the welds? Solvents/degreaser, grind, etc etc?

I've gotta say this has been one strange trip for me. First time welding ever was my stand, and now I'm about to jump into stainless. My fiancee thinks I'm crazy when I throw on the helmet. I've learned a lot and look forward to giving back down the road!

Thanks.

Bryan

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Old 01-10-2010, 04:17 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bkloos View Post
Thanks again guys for all the advice!!!

I will run a bunch of practice beads today (may even give the razor blades a shot!!!) and report back later.

I hear you about the gas lines... I noticed the flow diference from my back-gas line compared to the torch line b/c of the increased resistance of the long tubing. I plan on cutting it shorter in an attempt to roughly equalize the flow rates to the front and back. From there it will be a test of getting the total pressure up enough to run a clean weld... Time will tell.

Lastly, a question I've never asked. How do you guys like to clean and prep the surface before and after the welds? Solvents/degreaser, grind, etc etc?

I've gotta say this has been one strange trip for me. First time welding ever was my stand, and now I'm about to jump into stainless. My fiancee thinks I'm crazy when I throw on the helmet. I've learned a lot and look forward to giving back down the road!

Thanks.

Bryan
When it comes to the razor blades, start the arc on the table and move into the blades. The High freq is enough to blow away the metal. Have fun.

Before I weld I like to use scotch brite to get the surface shinny. I then like to use acetone to wipe the surfaces off. Try to use something that wont leave behind a lot of lint.

After the weld I use a SS wire brush that has not been used for anything but SS. Don't use a mild steel wire brush. I like to wire brush it while it is still hot. If more of a polish is wanted/needed after that. I use what ever the polish requires. 99% of the time it is just some more scotch brite.

SS is nice cause it doesn't require as heavy of a purge as other metals. Set the pre start on your machien at about 1-1.5 sec. This will flow gas for that amount of time when you step on the pedal before the machine starts the arc. Your gonna want at least a 5 sec post flow setting on the gas too. I run more time then that. But that's just me.

I'm sure a lot of people will say I go too far with prep and what not. But what I do requires the weldor to be very disciplined.
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Old 01-10-2010, 11:29 PM   #9
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Hey GreenMonti,

Would you take a pic of your torch and tungsten. How do you grind your tungsten and what do you use? I've heard all sorts of which way is best. Just wanted to get it from someone that does it for a living. I've been told to use 3/32" tungsten and I found it to be too large for what I'm doing on the kegs. I will take yours and Swagman's advice and go 1/16"

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Old 01-10-2010, 11:54 PM   #10
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Hey Guys,

I just ran a few beads on an old kettle lid... First time with SS, and it was a bit different than mild, though this is probably obvious to all those more experienced than myself. The puddle seems to act a bit different. I blew a nice hole through the sheet at 70A. Guess I'll turn things down a bit

Anyway, The top of the beads looks nice, but the back was clearly sugared (no back-gas applied). Tomorrow I'll try the same with back-gas and tweak the flows...

If that works, I'll try welding in a coupler and post the pics (should make for some good laughs).

On the topic, what is the best way to drill the holes? I've got unibits and bi-metal hole saws. My concern, looking at the specs the OD of the coupler is 1.06". My #9 unibit does 7/8" and 1-1/8" with a few random steps in between... The hole saws only do 1" and 1-1/8". I don't have a metal lathe, nor do I want to purchase one. Will the random intermediate steps on the unibit get me close enough?

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