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Old 06-07-2011, 01:31 AM   #21
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I re-circ ice water, via a pump thru my CFC, but since I have free ice from work, that may be a moot point for you...

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Old 06-07-2011, 02:00 AM   #22
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Is this estimate going from 212 to 70 or 110ish to 70?
That was based on an 83°C (149°F) drop - so if you boil at 212, it would take the wort down to ~63°F. Basically every pound of ice melted will drop 5 gal of wort a little less than 5°F.
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Old 06-07-2011, 02:09 AM   #23
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That was based on an 83°C (149°F) drop - so if you boil at 212, it would take the wort down to ~63°F. Basically every pound of ice melted will drop 5 gal of wort a little less than 5°F.
Ok then my rough estimates make sense based on your math. 110-70 = 40 degrees. It takes less than 10 lbs of ice for me to get down to pitching.

Thanks for the clarification
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Old 06-09-2011, 04:39 PM   #24
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In the Texas summers when we brew we use a bucket of ice & pre-chill the cold water with a immersion chiller. Then on to the CFC for 70-75 wort. We have had 85 degree tap water before.

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Old 06-09-2011, 06:09 PM   #25
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if you use a longer coil in your chiller, the water temp will be higher at the exit, removing more heat per unit of water. the only "waste" you have in a chiller is water that exits the chiller without being heated to its full potential.

you can get the same effect by reducing the flow rate, though this increases the time it takes to chill.

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Old 06-09-2011, 06:56 PM   #26
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Default The Texas way is better.

Here is how we do it in Texas.
Start off by cooling from the tap and then switch to pumping chilled water.

Equipment that you will need:
1 pump (for recirculating the hot wort, i.e. March Pump)
1 counter flow chiller, of your choosing.
1 immersion chiller (but not to be immersed in the wort)
1 cooler (I use the 10 gallon cooler that I had the mash in)
3-4 bags of ice
1 immersion pump or some other pump to recirculate the cold water once then wort drops to below 140° F
Since our tap water is not that cool, I have come up with the following.

Process
Attach the garden hose from the tap to the immersion chiller.
Put the immersion chiller in the cooler and fill with ice. This acts a pre-chiller for the tap water.
Connect immersion chiller to the water side of the counter flow chiller, and then connect a hose from the exit to go out to the tree or garden that needs the water. Everything here needs water desperately this year. Waste no water!
Now attach the boil kettle to the March pump and then the pump to the counter flow chiller.
You will then have a hose going from the counter flow chiller back to boil kettle.
NOTE: make sure all of the hoses, pump and counter flow chiller that come into contact with the wort has been cleaned and sanitized before you start to cool the wort. Do not rely on the boiling wort to do it for you.
Start by turning on the tap to start the water flowing through the immersion chiller and the counter flow chiller.
Start the March pump to recirculating the hot wort.
You will see the temperature start to drop right away.
Once the temperature of the wort has dropped below 140° F turn off the tap water.
Connect the hose that was attached to the tap to the immersion pump. Move the exit hose from the tree or garden to the cooler.
Turn on the pump and you will see the wort rapidly drop in temperature. Add ice to the cooler as needed. This way you are recirculating the cold water back into the ice filled cooler through the pre-chiller, pump, counter flow chiller and back.
Using this process we have dropped a 10 gallon batch from boiling to 65° F in less than 15 minutes.

Once you are done you dump the remaining water in the garden, it needs it.

Transfer the wort to the carboy and you are ready to pitch the yeast.

By the way I don’t buy ice I have a ice maker I found on craigslist.

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Old 01-05-2013, 01:35 AM   #27
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Using a pump and recirculating cooling water through a bucket of ice water is inefficient until you get down to 100F to 120F depending on your tap water temperature. Use tap water for the first part of the cooling. Then switch to recirculating icewater with a pond pump. Fit your wort chiller with quick connects to make it easy to change from tap water to recirculated water.

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Old 01-05-2013, 04:10 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Haussenbrau View Post
Using a pump and recirculating cooling water through a bucket of ice water is inefficient until you get down to 100F to 120F depending on your tap water temperature. Use tap water for the first part of the cooling. Then switch to recirculating icewater with a pond pump. Fit your wort chiller with quick connects to make it easy to change from tap water to recirculated water.
Agree but wow this is an old thread
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Old 01-19-2013, 11:15 PM   #29
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A super old thread but I have a quick question. Being in Florida my ground water doesn't get that low so I've always had to use an ice bath with my immersion chiller. I just bout a pond pump at Lowes that is a 600 gallon per hour pump but when I hooked it all up to my chiller it basically was running about 1 gallon per minute if that. For those of you using a system like this, is this about normal? I was expecting much better flow...

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Old 01-20-2013, 04:12 AM   #30
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I used one and realized quickly those ratings are dependent upon small lift distances. I always had to run mine at max flow and adjusted the flow rate by moving the cooler with ice on a stool or off the stool.

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