Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Vintage GE Kegerator
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-19-2013, 07:01 PM   #1
DWright
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Waxahachie, Texas
Posts: 15
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default Vintage GE Kegerator

I looked at all the threads with custom paint and decided to keep it original and vintage. Picked up the fridge on CL for $125, the taps with pulls and stems on ebay for $20 and couldn't be happier with the end result.

11585_10200853960462024_202340558_n.jpg  
__________________
DWright is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-19-2013, 07:07 PM   #2
NathPowe
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 442
Liked 97 Times on 74 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

Nice job dude. That thing is sweet.

__________________
NathPowe is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2013, 03:06 PM   #3
tonyc318
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Astoria, Oregon
Posts: 608
Liked 34 Times on 27 Posts

Default

How did you drill through the door?

__________________
tonyc318 is offline
Stealthcruiser Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2013, 05:39 PM   #4
Stealthcruiser
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Atlanta, (Hampton)., Georgia
Posts: 1,398
Liked 118 Times on 106 Posts
Likes Given: 2121

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyc318 View Post
How did you drill through the door?

As in, through the inner and outer portions?

You could: Mark your locations that you want your taps on the exterior, eyeball the interior panel and see if the location will work for you, (ie: flat enough, not in a radius that will cause you a problem, etc...), Make a pilot hole from the exterior through to the interior, using an extension bit, ( a LONG drill bit), go to the interior and figure out how much room you need around your shanks, so that you can easily secure them to the metal door, ( give your self room for a wrench and your hands to fit in the interior "cutout"), cut out the interior, make a "close out" box around your through the door "penetrations".
Then, open up your holes through the skin to your shank or tap size, whatever you need.
I don't know the sizes, but there is prolly' an el cheapo "unibit" out there to meet your needs.

OR:
Lay it out the same way, pull the inner door skin and the ensuing fiberglass insulation mess, and make your cuts / modifications to the inner skin.

Wear a dust mask when screwin' with the inner liner and fiberglass insulation!


Howzat?
__________________

Corned Beef............The other pink meat.

Stealthcruiser is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-01-2014, 02:35 PM   #5
tonyc318
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Astoria, Oregon
Posts: 608
Liked 34 Times on 27 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stealthcruiser View Post
As in, through the inner and outer portions?



You could: Mark your locations that you want your taps on the exterior, eyeball the interior panel and see if the location will work for you, (ie: flat enough, not in a radius that will cause you a problem, etc...), Make a pilot hole from the exterior through to the interior, using an extension bit, ( a LONG drill bit), go to the interior and figure out how much room you need around your shanks, so that you can easily secure them to the metal door, ( give your self room for a wrench and your hands to fit in the interior "cutout"), cut out the interior, make a "close out" box around your through the door "penetrations".

Then, open up your holes through the skin to your shank or tap size, whatever you need.

I don't know the sizes, but there is prolly' an el cheapo "unibit" out there to meet your needs.



OR:

Lay it out the same way, pull the inner door skin and the ensuing fiberglass insulation mess, and make your cuts / modifications to the inner skin.



Wear a dust mask when screwin' with the inner liner and fiberglass insulation!





Howzat?

I guess I meant the whole door. What kind of drill bits do I need to get through the door?
__________________
tonyc318 is offline
Stealthcruiser Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2014, 11:54 AM   #6
DWright
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Waxahachie, Texas
Posts: 15
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I took a regular bit drilled through both the inner and outer together. Then took a step bit and drilled them separately. I did take it apart first to ensure I wasn't going to hit one of the braces inside. Don't over engineer it.

__________________
DWright is offline
Stealthcruiser Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2014, 04:35 PM   #7
Stealthcruiser
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Atlanta, (Hampton)., Georgia
Posts: 1,398
Liked 118 Times on 106 Posts
Likes Given: 2121

Default

Regular "high speed" drill bits for your pilot holes.


And "DWright".........What kind of braces did you find inside, if any?
I figured the curve of the door, and the rigidity of the liner made them both "self supporting" due to their shapes.

That said, I've not had an early fridge door apart in a LOT of years!

__________________

Corned Beef............The other pink meat.

Stealthcruiser is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-03-2014, 11:59 AM   #8
DWright
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Waxahachie, Texas
Posts: 15
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Standard Drill bits for the pilot holes. I went and bought a pack of two step bits for the larger holes. I believe they cost $12 at Harbor Freight. If I remember correctly there is an X brace in there that runs corner to corner. The only other thing to take into consideration is the placement of the stem on the right if you are facing it. Most of these old fridges have an ice box/maker in the upper right. I used a short stem and 90 degree connection that enabled me to place that tap where it is.

__________________
DWright is offline
Stealthcruiser Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Vintage GE Kegerator kerber DIY Projects 94 03-07-2013 08:46 PM
For Sale - Vintage GE Kegerator marksbernal For Sale 0 07-20-2012 02:41 PM
Vintage Kegerator JRems DIY Projects 13 06-12-2012 02:42 AM
Vintage Kegerator Retarded_Penguin_Brewing Equipment/Sanitation 3 11-30-2011 04:45 AM