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Old 10-22-2012, 04:17 PM   #11
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If you had a quote of $700 to install the header, posts on each side there as well as removal of the wall & shoring up the roof correctly until the new header is in place... that isn't too bad actually.

putting in the posts on each side, header on the posts wouldn't be the toughest thing...

shoring the roof without any damage or deflection that would crack your ceiling would be the biggest pain in a**

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Old 10-22-2012, 04:36 PM   #12
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Do yourself and consult a professional. There is a reason why engineers and architects are licensed by the states.

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Old 10-22-2012, 05:21 PM   #13
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If you had a quote of $700 to install the header, posts on each side there as well as removal of the wall & shoring up the roof correctly until the new header is in place... that isn't too bad actually.

putting in the posts on each side, header on the posts wouldn't be the toughest thing...

shoring the roof without any damage or deflection that would crack your ceiling would be the biggest pain in a**
When i got that quote i wasnt educated enough to ask exactly how he would do it. I need to call him back but its a pain in the ass to get ahold of this guy. He has done remodel work for several friends and even my sister though.

I had another contractor come out and he said 1100 to shore both sides of the wall, run the 4x4 posts all the way through the floor to concrete pads in the crawl space below, and install a 4x8 header.
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Old 10-22-2012, 05:58 PM   #14
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If you have a guy that will do that kind of work for $700, send him my way!

I'm in a similar situation, I have a load-bearing wall I want to remove to open up two rooms into a big family room. I had two contractors come out and look at it to give me an estimate, and then I never heard from either of them again!

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Old 10-23-2012, 12:35 AM   #15
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If you have a guy that will do that kind of work for $700, send him my way!

I'm in a similar situation, I have a load-bearing wall I want to remove to open up two rooms into a big family room. I had two contractors come out and look at it to give me an estimate, and then I never heard from either of them again!
That guy does good work but jeez it is a pain in the ass to get ahold of him. I need to make sure he was going to put the posts kn the concrete pads if that is what was needed
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Old 10-23-2012, 06:20 PM   #16
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Don't forget your building permit and your plans need to be stamped by an architect/engineer.

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Old 10-23-2012, 06:33 PM   #17
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Disclaimer: I am an licensed architect.

Since your dealing with a load bearing wall, I would bring in an engineer or an architect to analyze the situation and size a beam and supports that can properly handle the load. There are many good contractors out there but they haven't gone through the structural training that architects/engineers have and they don't have much experience sizing beams and determining loads.

A4J is right and you will have to have a engineer or architect provide signed and sealed plans in order to get a building permit.

I'd help you out if I was in CA, but I'm in Oregon so it would be a bit of a drive.

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Old 10-23-2012, 07:19 PM   #18
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Disclaimer: I am an licensed architect.

Since your dealing with a load bearing wall, I would bring in an engineer or an architect to analyze the situation and size a beam and supports that can properly handle the load. There are many good contractors out there but they haven't gone through the structural training that architects/engineers have and they don't have much experience sizing beams and determining loads.

A4J is right and you will have to have a engineer or architect provide signed and sealed plans in order to get a building permit.

I'd help you out if I was in CA, but I'm in Oregon so it would be a bit of a drive.
Thanks for the advice. I read on a diy website if you call a truss company they can plug your numbers in and size a beam for you. Is that not good enough? Any way you can recommend whether i would need concrete pads and what size by dimensions and pictures?
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Old 10-23-2012, 07:42 PM   #19
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This is a situation where you need to pay a professional.
There are a lot of variables that need to be considered and taking someones advice over the net isn't a good idea.
I'm not saying that you're not capable of doing some or all of the work, but from the questions you're asking, it's obvious you need a professional.
Some one with a license, insurance, history, workman's comp, etc.
Also, a building permit will give you the peace of mind that the job is done right.
Check out Angie's List if they are available in your area.
Bull

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Old 10-23-2012, 07:51 PM   #20
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Thanks for the advice. I read on a diy website if you call a truss company they can plug your numbers in and size a beam for you. Is that not good enough? Any way you can recommend whether i would need concrete pads and what size by dimensions and pictures?
You can call a truss or engineered wood company and have them size a beam for you. They do provide engineering services and will provide stamped drawings that you can take to the building department. However, I don't know if they will do that for a renovation project due to liability, but it doesn't hurt to ask, and I do know that they will do it for new construction.

Personally I wouldn't feel comfortable giving you structural advice over the internet especially since you have an older house and they tend to have weird framing situations and it would really require me to inspect the situation in person.
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