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-   -   PVC Tower Cooling Solution (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/pvc-tower-cooling-solution-43072/)

bradsul 04-02-2008 08:42 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lspr_mtu
That is an awesome solution - I like it. If you wanted to boost insulation a bit more, you might even thinking about a shot or two of that spray-on insulation for the upper beer line / shank area. You could probably construct a thin cardboard barrier to give you a clean volume for the additional insulation such that you could slide it out of the top whenever you need to mess with the line/shank interface...
I did something similar with the cap of the tower, though not to quite that extent. Just a circular piece of extruded foam insulation (leftover from my son of fermentation chiller build). It comes down right to the top of the shanks, so it doesn't leave too much of an airspace in there.

Attachment 5008

ThatGeekGuy 08-31-2012 01:17 AM

3 Attachment(s)

I'm glad I found this post before I built my Danby Kegerator. I used 1/2 pipe, nice close fit to the tower hoses, then jacketed with foam plumbing tube inside the tower. Bundled with tie wraps, a nice snug fit that stays in the tower all by itself. Can't wait to try it out.

Attachment 73944



Attachment 73945



Attachment 73946


ThatGeekGuy 08-31-2012 01:17 AM

3 Attachment(s)

I'm glad I found this post before I built my Danby Kegerator. I used 1/2 pipe, nice close fit to the tower hoses, then jacketed with foam plumbing tube inside the tower. Bundled with tie wraps, a nice snug fit that stays in the tower all by itself. Can't wait to try it out.

Attachment 73944



Attachment 73945



Attachment 73946


ThatGeekGuy 08-31-2012 01:17 AM

3 Attachment(s)

I'm glad I found this post before I built my Danby Kegerator. I used 1/2 pipe, nice close fit to the tower hoses, then jacketed with foam plumbing tube inside the tower. Bundled with tie wraps, a nice snug fit that stays in the tower all by itself. Can't wait to try it out.

Attachment 73944



Attachment 73945



Attachment 73946


Briz34 07-26-2013 12:03 AM

Copper Pipe Beer Line Cooling to Tower
 
4 Attachment(s)

Guys,

Figured I'd post my pics of this project I just did. I built this kegerator a couple years ago and figured I'd add this modification instead of the fan route. (I also removed my temp sensor which was connected directly to the back coolant plate and left it hanging on the bottom, much better control of temps which will get your beer cooler without a wide range like hey its 40 then a small nudge of the knob and now its 25! haha)


Here's what I picked up: 4' of 1/2" copper pipe (type L cause it was cheaper), 2 - 1/2" pipe T's, 2 - 1/2" elbows, and spray foam.

Luckily I was able to have the guy at the shop cut the pipe for me so I just bought a reamer to remove the burrs. My pipe lengths were 2 - 14" pieces, and 4 - 5.5" pieces.

I had to remove the top connections due to the keg connectors to tube connection having some kind of crimped clamp instead of a pipe clamp (not a big deal just more work). Added plastic wrap on the ends of the beers lines and just slid them up the copper pipe (remember to add the 1/2" T connection on the bottom!) and installed the beer line back onto the metal tube fitting then back onto the tap shank. Notice there's rubber bands in-between the pipe and the tubes, this is to hold them in place while I sprayed the foam and it set. I also manipulated the beer lines so that the pipes stayed away from the edges and didn't move during the set-up time. Then I started from the bottom and sprayed foam until the bottom was filled and then filled the top. Here's where you should be cautious; DO NOT COMPLETELY FILL THE TOWER WITH FOAM! What I mean by this is leave a good 1-2" of the copper exposed to allow for the foam to expand and NOT GO PAST the copper pipe. You want the tops exposed to keep that small pocket of air cooled as well. Yes you can trim back the foam however it's just an extra pain especially when it gets around your tube clamp (want to make sure you have access to those if you ever have to remove the line in the future).

I currently have my too kegs (dark cherry lager and canadian blonde XXX X= increased alcohol content) chillin there then will start carbonating soon. I should have some results in 2 weeks.


Briz34 07-26-2013 12:03 AM

Copper Pipe Beer Line Cooling to Tower
 
4 Attachment(s)

Guys,

Figured I'd post my pics of this project I just did. I built this kegerator a couple years ago and figured I'd add this modification instead of the fan route. (I also removed my temp sensor which was connected directly to the back coolant plate and left it hanging on the bottom, much better control of temps which will get your beer cooler without a wide range like hey its 40 then a small nudge of the knob and now its 25! haha)


Here's what I picked up: 4' of 1/2" copper pipe (type L cause it was cheaper), 2 - 1/2" pipe T's, 2 - 1/2" elbows, and spray foam.

Luckily I was able to have the guy at the shop cut the pipe for me so I just bought a reamer to remove the burrs. My pipe lengths were 2 - 14" pieces, and 4 - 5.5" pieces.

I had to remove the top connections due to the keg connectors to tube connection having some kind of crimped clamp instead of a pipe clamp (not a big deal just more work). Added plastic wrap on the ends of the beers lines and just slid them up the copper pipe (remember to add the 1/2" T connection on the bottom!) and installed the beer line back onto the metal tube fitting then back onto the tap shank. Notice there's rubber bands in-between the pipe and the tubes, this is to hold them in place while I sprayed the foam and it set. I also manipulated the beer lines so that the pipes stayed away from the edges and didn't move during the set-up time. Then I started from the bottom and sprayed foam until the bottom was filled and then filled the top. Here's where you should be cautious; DO NOT COMPLETELY FILL THE TOWER WITH FOAM! What I mean by this is leave a good 1-2" of the copper exposed to allow for the foam to expand and NOT GO PAST the copper pipe. You want the tops exposed to keep that small pocket of air cooled as well. Yes you can trim back the foam however it's just an extra pain especially when it gets around your tube clamp (want to make sure you have access to those if you ever have to remove the line in the future).

I currently have my too kegs (dark cherry lager and canadian blonde XXX X= increased alcohol content) chillin there then will start carbonating soon. I should have some results in 2 weeks.


Briz34 07-26-2013 12:03 AM

Copper Pipe Beer Line Cooling to Tower
 
4 Attachment(s)

Guys,

Figured I'd post my pics of this project I just did. I built this kegerator a couple years ago and figured I'd add this modification instead of the fan route. (I also removed my temp sensor which was connected directly to the back coolant plate and left it hanging on the bottom, much better control of temps which will get your beer cooler without a wide range like hey its 40 then a small nudge of the knob and now its 25! haha)


Here's what I picked up: 4' of 1/2" copper pipe (type L cause it was cheaper), 2 - 1/2" pipe T's, 2 - 1/2" elbows, and spray foam.

Luckily I was able to have the guy at the shop cut the pipe for me so I just bought a reamer to remove the burrs. My pipe lengths were 2 - 14" pieces, and 4 - 5.5" pieces.

I had to remove the top connections due to the keg connectors to tube connection having some kind of crimped clamp instead of a pipe clamp (not a big deal just more work). Added plastic wrap on the ends of the beers lines and just slid them up the copper pipe (remember to add the 1/2" T connection on the bottom!) and installed the beer line back onto the metal tube fitting then back onto the tap shank. Notice there's rubber bands in-between the pipe and the tubes, this is to hold them in place while I sprayed the foam and it set. I also manipulated the beer lines so that the pipes stayed away from the edges and didn't move during the set-up time. Then I started from the bottom and sprayed foam until the bottom was filled and then filled the top. Here's where you should be cautious; DO NOT COMPLETELY FILL THE TOWER WITH FOAM! What I mean by this is leave a good 1-2" of the copper exposed to allow for the foam to expand and NOT GO PAST the copper pipe. You want the tops exposed to keep that small pocket of air cooled as well. Yes you can trim back the foam however it's just an extra pain especially when it gets around your tube clamp (want to make sure you have access to those if you ever have to remove the line in the future).

I currently have my too kegs (dark cherry lager and canadian blonde XXX X= increased alcohol content) chillin there then will start carbonating soon. I should have some results in 2 weeks.


Briz34 07-26-2013 12:03 AM

Copper Pipe Beer Line Cooling to Tower
 
4 Attachment(s)

Guys,

Figured I'd post my pics of this project I just did. I built this kegerator a couple years ago and figured I'd add this modification instead of the fan route. (I also removed my temp sensor which was connected directly to the back coolant plate and left it hanging on the bottom, much better control of temps which will get your beer cooler without a wide range like hey its 40 then a small nudge of the knob and now its 25! haha)


Here's what I picked up: 4' of 1/2" copper pipe (type L cause it was cheaper), 2 - 1/2" pipe T's, 2 - 1/2" elbows, and spray foam.

Luckily I was able to have the guy at the shop cut the pipe for me so I just bought a reamer to remove the burrs. My pipe lengths were 2 - 14" pieces, and 4 - 5.5" pieces.

I had to remove the top connections due to the keg connectors to tube connection having some kind of crimped clamp instead of a pipe clamp (not a big deal just more work). Added plastic wrap on the ends of the beers lines and just slid them up the copper pipe (remember to add the 1/2" T connection on the bottom!) and installed the beer line back onto the metal tube fitting then back onto the tap shank. Notice there's rubber bands in-between the pipe and the tubes, this is to hold them in place while I sprayed the foam and it set. I also manipulated the beer lines so that the pipes stayed away from the edges and didn't move during the set-up time. Then I started from the bottom and sprayed foam until the bottom was filled and then filled the top. Here's where you should be cautious; DO NOT COMPLETELY FILL THE TOWER WITH FOAM! What I mean by this is leave a good 1-2" of the copper exposed to allow for the foam to expand and NOT GO PAST the copper pipe. You want the tops exposed to keep that small pocket of air cooled as well. Yes you can trim back the foam however it's just an extra pain especially when it gets around your tube clamp (want to make sure you have access to those if you ever have to remove the line in the future).

I currently have my too kegs (dark cherry lager and canadian blonde XXX X= increased alcohol content) chillin there then will start carbonating soon. I should have some results in 2 weeks.



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