The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Pulling a hole for tri-clamp fitting

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-30-2011, 03:05 PM   #1
dmfa200
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Madison
Posts: 526
Liked 8 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default Pulling a hole for tri-clamp fitting

Learned this technique from a guy that does sanitary welding.
Doing this makes it possible to reach the backside of a weld and address any imperfections that may arise.
Just slapping a fitting on top and welding I have found is easy but does not look as good either.
To tell you the truth, this method proved to be even easier than expected, and the result is a more professional look and completely sanitary weld.

I did this work for a local brewery that wanted to be a be able to push a five gallon pitch of yeast into their fermentors, instead of their usual method of pitching from the top on a ladder. They have 40 bbl fermentors so it's about 15 feet at the top.

The tool is simply a piece of steel with an 8 degree taper on it. A hole drilled thru the center and a piece of all-thread tack welded to it with a nut on the end. Now that I think about it, the nut is not necessary.
The other part of the tool is just a piece of pipe capped on the end with an over sized nut welded on top for the all-thread to pass thru. Again the nut is optional, but that's how I constructed it.

The cone passes thru the hole from the inside with the pipe portion of the tool sitting over the hole. The all-thread passes thru the capped pipe, and the cone is pulled thru the hole by turning the nut on the all-thread until the entire cone passes thru the wall of the keg

To pull the hole I drilled a 7/8" hole and de-burred the hole and smoothed the edges so the metal would not tear while the cone was pushing it's way thru the hole. The result is a flanged 1 3/8" ID hole to match the ID of the fitting to be welded to the keg.

dsc01907.jpg   dsc01918.jpg   dsc01921.jpg   dsc01933.jpg   dsc01938.jpg  

__________________

I don't know what you said, but your wrong.

dmfa200 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-30-2011, 03:10 PM   #2
dmfa200
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Madison
Posts: 526
Liked 8 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

The first photo is of the tool
the second is the the hole after being pulled
third is the fit of the fitting to the hole
of course the finished weld
and lastly the inside of the fitting after blending the weld

The yeast vessel almost finished with legs tack welded welded.
The fitting is welded on the bottom of the keg.

And another photo of the bottom.

dsc01942.jpg   dsc01930.jpg  
__________________

I don't know what you said, but your wrong.

dmfa200 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-30-2011, 03:18 PM   #3
MonkeyWrench
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Republic of Cascadia
Posts: 349
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Nice job. At first I wondered why bother putting a tri-clamp in the bottom instead of flipping the keg over, but now I see.

__________________
Monkey Wrench Brewing
MonkeyWrench is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-30-2011, 04:49 PM   #4
OneHoppyGuy
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
HomeBrewTalk 2012 Vendor Giveaway Participate
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
OneHoppyGuy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Concord, CA
Posts: 1,704
Liked 39 Times on 32 Posts
Likes Given: 52

Default

the welding is first class!

__________________

Brewright. All Rights Reserved. We reserve the right to brew and to help you brew. To protect the brew and defend the brew. To make the brew and drink the brew.

BrewSteel.com
BrewSteel on Facebook

OneHoppyGuy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-30-2011, 06:05 PM   #5
dmfa200
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Madison
Posts: 526
Liked 8 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MonkeyWrench View Post
Nice job. At first I wondered why bother putting a tri-clamp in the bottom instead of flipping the keg over, but now I see.
Thanks

Yeah, the guy wanted it out the side at the bottom, but told him it would work better off the bottom. It allows the contents to empty completely.
__________________

I don't know what you said, but your wrong.

dmfa200 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-13-2011, 03:07 AM   #6
ohararp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Hampton, VA
Posts: 65
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

dmfa200, I just posted about doing something very similar with 1/2 couplers. I am now thinking about trying out with tri clamps so your post is very helpful!

PS What kind of keg is this? Did you weld those together too?

__________________

Last edited by ohararp; 12-13-2011 at 03:09 AM.
ohararp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-13-2011, 11:56 AM   #7
tasteebrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Chattanooga, TN
Posts: 22
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

that is a slim line 1/4 barrel... fairly new in the industry, or at least fairly new to be adopted as a replacement for old squatty quarters.

__________________
tasteebrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-29-2011, 03:58 AM   #8
ftlstrings
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Salem, Oregon
Posts: 296
Default

That was a really nice looking bead on your weld! How long did it take you to get to that level?

~M~

__________________

"I asked God for a bike, but I know God doesn't work that way. So I stole a bike and asked for forgiveness."

ftlstrings is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-30-2011, 12:49 AM   #9
dmfa200
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Madison
Posts: 526
Liked 8 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ftlstrings View Post
That was a really nice looking bead on your weld! How long did it take you to get to that level?

~M~
Well, I've been welding for 22 years now so I'm not really sure when I reached the particular level your asking about.
Thing is my skills have progressed over the years.
I started off stick welding structural steel, then mig, and flux core.
After about 6 years of that, I got into pipe welding so I had to learn tig, and up my skills in stick welding.
In the pipe welding trade it's said that you really aren't a real pipe welder till you have about 5 years under your belt. This is where I honed my tig welding skills.
For the last 5 years I've been working for an aerospace company.
I'm sorry but it's not that definite.
To tell you the truth, welding is a unique skill. Some people pick it up very quickly, and some will just never "get it"
__________________

I don't know what you said, but your wrong.

dmfa200 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-30-2011, 01:15 AM   #10
BiggieB400
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 50
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmfa200
Learned this technique from a guy that does sanitary welding.
Doing this makes it possible to reach the backside of a weld and address any imperfections that may arise.
Just slapping a fitting on top and welding I have found is easy but does not look as good either.
To tell you the truth, this method proved to be even easier than expected, and the result is a more professional look and completely sanitary weld.

I did this work for a local brewery that wanted to be a be able to push a five gallon pitch of yeast into their fermentors, instead of their usual method of pitching from the top on a ladder. They have 40 bbl fermentors so it's about 15 feet at the top.

The tool is simply a piece of steel with an 8 degree taper on it. A hole drilled thru the center and a piece of all-thread tack welded to it with a nut on the end. Now that I think about it, the nut is not necessary.
The other part of the tool is just a piece of pipe capped on the end with an over sized nut welded on top for the all-thread to pass thru. Again the nut is optional, but that's how I constructed it.

The cone passes thru the hole from the inside with the pipe portion of the tool sitting over the hole. The all-thread passes thru the capped pipe, and the cone is pulled thru the hole by turning the nut on the all-thread until the entire cone passes thru the wall of the keg

To pull the hole I drilled a 7/8" hole and de-burred the hole and smoothed the edges so the metal would not tear while the cone was pushing it's way thru the hole. The result is a flanged 1 3/8" ID hole to match the ID of the fitting to be welded to the keg.
This is a very slick technique!! Just so I am clear, the all thread is roughly 7/8" in diameter and the largest, smooth section of the cone plug is 1 3/8" to match the diameter of the triclover fitting??
__________________
BiggieB400 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to Determine Tri-Clamp Size? RonRock DIY Projects 6 02-11-2011 07:24 PM
Sourcing Tri-Clamp Adapters? hatfieldenator DIY Projects 15 12-15-2010 10:33 AM
Oops... one inch hole for weldless fitting BarnabyHooge DIY Projects 22 02-25-2010 05:13 AM
tri-clover clamp size GreasyGuitar DIY Projects 2 02-13-2010 05:34 PM
Triple clamp supplies Todd DIY Projects 9 10-23-2006 03:40 PM