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Old 08-05-2010, 02:22 AM   #1
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Default power supply for a 130v DC gear motor

I have recently gotten a 130v DC gear motor that I want to use to power my grain mill. For the life of me I cannot find any info that will help direct me as how this will be powered. I mean does it take something as simple as using a 12v dc transformer to power this motor? Or, how about using a pulse width modulator? I just don't know how and what to use. I do have an understanding of electricity, but I would appreciate some help in the right direction. All of you electrically inclined people please help a brother out.



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Old 08-05-2010, 03:30 AM   #2
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usually dc gearmotors are driven by pulse width modulated variable-speed controllers, but if all you want to do is run it at top speed you just need a simple rectifier to convert ac line voltage to dc.

12vdc won't be enough voltage to run a 130vdc motor.. rectified line voltage is close enough (110-125vac rectified to dc)


130vdc is an odd voltage for most gearmotors... most of them run at 90vdc.



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Old 08-05-2010, 03:42 AM   #3
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Here is a starting point for a AC - DC drive http://www.kbelectronics.com/Variable_Speed_DC_Drives/DC_Drives_Chassis.htm, not sure if you are looking for a pre built unit or want to make your own. Search for 115AC to 130VDC motor drives and you should be able to find one to fit your budget.

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Old 08-05-2010, 11:15 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marzsit View Post
usually dc gearmotors are driven by pulse width modulated variable-speed controllers, but if all you want to do is run it at top speed you just need a simple rectifier to convert ac line voltage to dc.

12vdc won't be enough voltage to run a 130vdc motor.. rectified line voltage is close enough (110-125vac rectified to dc)


130vdc is an odd voltage for most gearmotors... most of them run at 90vdc.
I don't think that is a good idea as you have no isolation. A simple isolation transformer of sufficient current carrying capability before the rectifier and a filter capacitor after the diode would help. The best solution is the motor speed controller Kevin suggested above.
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Old 08-05-2010, 01:06 PM   #5
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I converted a DC gearmotor to AC for my mill. I'm at work and do not remember all the specifics, pretty sure my motor is 130 volt Bodine. However, I'll poke around my stuff when I get home and PM you details.

Essentially, you need to find an isolation transformer. This will protect you and the motor.

I found one that dropped the 120V to 90V AC because the voltage increases when converting to DC (something about peak voltages -- essentially 90VAC * square root of 2= 127VDC). Then I ran that output thru a RadioShack bridge rectifier to get to DC, and added in a capacitor to smooth out the voltage.

end result - that thing turns slow, (rated speed was 60RPM) but it will crush rocks! Super torque.

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Old 08-05-2010, 09:17 PM   #6
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Thanks for the responses. After some probing on the internet and looking at some of the answers to my questions I have come to the terms that it's too hard to find a 130v dc motor control. Plus if there is one out there then it will be too cost effective for my budget. So, I was able to replace the 130v dc motor with a 90v dc motor. Which is not too bad and plus it has more torque.

Now I still hafta find a way to get a 120v ac to 90v dc motor control. So far i have found one on ebay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Input-AC110V-Output-DC90V-Motor-Speed-Controller-120W-/140413473184?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0

Features:
1. Input power supply: AC110V 50/60Hz
2. Output: DC0-90V 120W.
3. Dimension: 100 x 60 x 112mm (3.9 x 2.4 x 4.4 inch)
4. Cut size: 82 x 54 mm (3.5 x 2.1 inch)

Who knows maybe I can make one and save some dinero. Anyone have a suggestion?

Rob

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Old 08-06-2010, 12:42 AM   #7
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I use the KB Electronics DC drive model KBMM-125, 90VDC with 1/2 and 1 HP motors.
My cost was $87.00 and will work with your 130VDC motor except your motor will not reach full speed.
The nice thing about the controller, comes with current limiting, IR compensation, Min and Max speed adjustment.
KBWT-110 or 112 is a 130 VDC drive controller.

One of my project pictures.



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Old 08-06-2010, 02:04 AM   #8
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Go cheap look for a used 1, 1 1/2 or 2 HP threadmill motor as they come up as failed weight loss items even curbside finds. These motors have a LED shutter wheel for constant rpm control no matter the motor torque demanded.
This with the electronic set speed control panel you can build a solid rpm controlled high HP mill motor rather cheap or even free. These motors also have a flywheel with the fan as a cast unit plus poly belt drive. Run this to a jackshaft then to the mill removing mill bushing radial side loading, LoveJoy direct coupling. Function before money and beauty, JMO.

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Old 08-06-2010, 02:53 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sawdustguy View Post
I don't think that is a good idea as you have no isolation. A simple isolation transformer of sufficient current carrying capability before the rectifier and a filter capacitor after the diode would help. The best solution is the motor speed controller Kevin suggested above.
i have a coleman powermate air compressor that has a 90vdc motor, and no isolation transformer. it was built that way at the factory, and i've never been zapped while using it...

a single diode isn't a rectifier. you need 4 to make a full-wave rectifier.


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