Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Need Help with Natural Gas Line

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-22-2010, 02:11 AM   #1
Doc Robinson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Fishers, IN
Posts: 2,386
Liked 11 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default Need Help with Natural Gas Line

Propane is too expensive. I want to run natural gas to my garage. On the other side of this wall is the garage. It seems that all I would need to do is:

1) Shut of the main
2) Disconnect one of the outs
3) Install a brass T
4) Attach a shutoff valve to the T and connect flex tubing
5) Run the flex tubing through the wall and out to the garage

Does that sound about right?

__________________
Doc Robinson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-22-2010, 04:02 AM   #2
Brewers Hardware
Vendor
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 455
Liked 6 Times on 5 Posts

Default

I have never seen so many gas lines in a house. Not to mention what look like flexible lines. Not that I'm an expert, but I'd consult one in your case.

Brewers Hardware is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-22-2010, 09:04 AM   #3
Skins_Brew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Skins_Brew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Silver Spring, MD.
Posts: 1,215
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Yea I would maybe get in touch with a gasfitter. There are certain regulations for the flex gas lines which you may be violating. I know some regulations are dumb, but they are there to keep your house from exploding.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Derrin
I have never seen so many gas lines in a house.
I count five gas lines. Could be for a Water heater, furnace, stove, dryer and a gas log.
__________________
Braves on the Warpath!
Fight for old D.C.!

I Support My LHBS!! (Maryland HB)

Last edited by Skins_Brew; 01-22-2010 at 09:09 AM.
Skins_Brew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-22-2010, 09:24 AM   #4
marzsit
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: kent, wa.
Posts: 315
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

looks pretty normal to me, the main line coming in from the meter is on the left, with it's own shutoff. then there is a regulator that appears to be properly grounded, and then 4 distribution lines with individual shutoffs (my guess is water heater, central heating furnace, kitchen range and gas fireplace insert/outdoor gas grill/etc..) this type of flexible gas piping is called CSST (corrugated stainless steel tubing) and is very common in new construction.

the problem with CSST is that it can only be sold to professionals who have been properly trained and certified, it can't be sold to homeowners like you and me...

__________________
marzsit is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-22-2010, 10:37 AM   #5
TommyBoy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Mentor-on-the-Lake, Ohio
Posts: 546
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Those flexible lines are the way to go if you have the cash. One connection at the beginning and one at the end. No multiple joints. They are more expensive but if you have the cash and means are a good idea. If you have a leak you don't have to go ripping through you walls. With those there are no right angles to restrict the flow. I have seen it done with water but that is the first time I have seen it in gas. You must have a new house.

__________________

Heros are made 10 gallons at a time.

Kegged/On Tap - Double IPA
Conditioning - Orange Ale

TommyBoy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-22-2010, 08:28 PM   #6
OLDBREW
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: SJ
Posts: 759
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts

Default

The one thing you need to know is what the demand is for the whole house in CF.
That regulator there after the main shut off tells you that you have higher then normal pressure supplying your house. The orifice in there, regulates the pressure to the secondary side of the regulator which is normally around .5lb (psi) for nat gas.

The secondary side is usually calculated by volume, so that manifold and zoned branches might not have enough volume to handle another appliance at the same time.

Two ways to get around this would be to hook it up the way you are thinking of on an equally demanding zone,

You would remove the existing gas valve and nipple below it.
then use a longer black iron nipple from the manifold up to get clearance above the other valves.

Then install a black iron tee, install your existing gas valve to the top of the tee, and a new gas valve on the side out of the tee for the garage run.

You could just use more black iron fittings and nipples to go through the garage wall from inside then put a shut off and quick connect adapter out in the garage like they use on air tools for the burner hookup.

You want at least 4 full wraps of teflon tape for all pipe joint fitting connections.

To use you just shut off the valve for that other appliance, and open up the garage valve while you are using the burner in the garage.

Or The second way would be to get another nat gas regulator calculated to handle your draw. You then put a tee in between the main shut off, and the first regulator. Then you would install the new regulator out of the tee, then a gas shut off valve, then your new gas line going to the garage would attach to that. That way you could use everything at once.

__________________

Last edited by OLDBREW; 01-25-2010 at 05:25 PM.
OLDBREW is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-23-2010, 03:01 PM   #7
Marsdude
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Fort Collins, CO, Colorado
Posts: 478
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Although I am new at brewing, I have a lot of experience in this type of thing.

"OLDBREW" has a lot of good advice and I would suggest he review what I am about to suggest.

If you use a line that feeds something like a kitchen stove then you do not have to worry about volume as long as you are not using both your burner and the stove at the same time.This could also work with a furnace as long as you have the heat turned down so the furnace would not come on while you are using your burner.

I wonder about the possibility of just adding a T to the line that seems to do a 90 off of the manifold and comes out toward the left. That is IF you can get the fittings. You would need to put a ball valve rated for gas on this. If you can't get flex you could run black pipe, harder to work with but you can get it at HD.

One important thing - if you do this yourself - make a solution of soapy water (dish soap is fine) in a spray bottle. After you have everything together spray this on all of your joints with the line under pressure and look for bubbles. This will tell you if you have any leaks.

__________________

Last edited by Marsdude; 01-23-2010 at 03:04 PM.
Marsdude is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-24-2010, 12:14 AM   #8
OLDBREW
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: SJ
Posts: 759
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts

Default

yes, that is what i was saying about his first work around, but raising that appliance valve up and putting the tee before the shut offs, so you can shut off the appliance feed that your stealing from, so no one can use it while you are using the garage feed.

BTW the adapter fittings that the valves have on them to connect those flex lines are gas adapter fittings.

Big box stores have coated flexible gas line for hot water heaters that have the NPT to gas adapters and the flex line all in one package.

__________________
OLDBREW is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-24-2010, 01:23 AM   #9
Doc Robinson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Fishers, IN
Posts: 2,386
Liked 11 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Awesome info OLDBREW. Thank you so much.

__________________
Doc Robinson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-24-2010, 06:35 PM   #10
flyguy340
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: MN
Posts: 12
Default

Most likely your regulator is more then adequate for your volume needed. Do a google search for your make/model of regulator and you should be able to find what the BTU output is. I have a similar setup, 2PSI gas from the gas meter then its reduced to roughly .5PSI and then manifolded to furnace, water heater, etc. One thing to consider with the reduced pressure natural gas (roughly .5PSI) is pipe diameter, pipe distance, type of pipe (steel,CSST, copper) and BTU load- again search online and you'll find some tables for that.

__________________
flyguy340 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I think my line is too short (not that line) EuBrew Bottling/Kegging 12 10-05-2009 12:53 PM
Natural Gas Feed Line? earlyd DIY Projects 12 02-25-2009 04:04 PM
Using 1/4" braided line for beer line - ok? bmckee56 Bottling/Kegging 12 02-22-2009 06:40 AM
Pilot gas line for Brutus with natural gas? datamike DIY Projects 6 01-22-2009 06:16 PM
Natural gas line to my shop conpewter General Chit Chat 6 09-03-2008 03:34 PM