Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Made a BIAB bag! 2.0

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-26-2012, 07:10 PM   #1
MrSpiffy
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 280
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts

Default Made a BIAB bag! 2.0

So my first go-around with making my own BIAB bag didn't go so well. It was a pain in the butt, I had to learn how to use a sewing machine at the same time, and I didn't know jack about stitching seams. So, my seams ended up starting to split open when I first used the bag. Fortunately, I was able to continue brewing and strain out any grain that escaped. But I surely needed a new and better bag, if I was going to continue into my all-grain excursion.

Today, I decided, would be the day to sew a new bag. If I want to brew this week, I need a bag. So, I whipped out the extra voile material that I had from my last attempt. I had plenty for another bag. Going on advice from my mom, I straight-stitched the inside seams, then I turned the bag outside-in and zig-zag-stitched the outside of the seams, folding the material over the original stitch, to give me a good 4-ply seam. It's not pretty. But I'm confident that it will hold a LOT better than my last attempt.

I also felt it was necessary to reinforce the edges where the drawstring would exit, so the material wouldn't rip. The black nylon webbing is to assist with that. I folded a strip over the top on each side, and then crossed them together with another strip, both inside and out, to also protect the long seam down the side of the bag.

The bottom is a circle, since I read about issues with dripping on the corners and grain getting stuck in the corners of rectangular bags. The drawstring just goes through the already-sewn loop for a curtain rod on the top, and is made of paracord.

I feel pretty confident about hanging it to drain by the paracord. But I'll still probably wrap the cord around the top of the bag, first, for extra support, and then hang it.





__________________
MrSpiffy is offline
tankcrash Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-26-2012, 07:44 PM   #2
inhousebrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: minneapolis, minnesota
Posts: 1,424
Liked 121 Times on 110 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

Looks good enough to me

__________________

I hate Walder Frey...

inhousebrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-26-2012, 07:46 PM   #3
tankcrash
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Kent, Wa
Posts: 65
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Very good write up .... pretty sure I am going to follow your design to the letter. I have some extra nylon webbing laying around so think I might add a strip of that surrounding the draw cord.

__________________
tankcrash is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-26-2012, 07:48 PM   #4
mb82
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Charlottesville, Va
Posts: 606
Liked 47 Times on 41 Posts
Likes Given: 28

Default

Looks like it will work. I need to get around to reinforcing my stitches. While they have held I am nervous about them.

__________________
Gezond Brewery

Primary: Chesterfield wild(1 gal), Schepen
Bottled: SMASH, Chesterfield Wild, Summer In Sommelsdijk, Dog Days Saison
Up coming beers:
mb82 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-26-2012, 08:13 PM   #5
MrSpiffy
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 280
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts

Default

Last time I made the mistake of sewing too close to my edges. If the edges aren't lined up perfectly, you could end up sewing too close to one edge, leaving very little material holding the bag together. (Did that last time...) Then your material can fray and pull right through the stitches, opening nice holes in the seams. (Yep, that happened last time...)

This time, I made sure to leave a good 1/2" of material next to my stitches, so that I wouldn't run into that problem again if I wandered while sewing. I'm pretty confident these seams will hold this time.

__________________
MrSpiffy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-26-2012, 08:25 PM   #6
sweetcell
Swollen Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
sweetcell's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Rockville, MD
Posts: 4,005
Liked 632 Times on 469 Posts
Likes Given: 247

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSpiffy View Post
Going on advice from my mom, I straight-stitched the inside seams, then I turned the bag outside-in and zig-zag-stitched the outside of the seams, folding the material over the original stitch, to give me a good 4-ply seam.
could we get a close-up photo of your seam?

thanks for writing this up!
__________________
.
What hops should I grow? Hop grower's comparison table. Looking for cheap honey?

Drinking: a hop-bursted IPA w/ Conan, a farmhouse with ECY08 & brett blend
Fermenting: sour cherry mead
Aging: a bunch of belgian and soured stuff, and acerglyn.
Up next: either an imperial stout or something to use up my homegrown hops... TBD.
sweetcell is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-26-2012, 09:27 PM   #7
Cider123
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: , Maine
Posts: 926
Liked 200 Times on 123 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I now see the benefit of a well formed bag. I brewed today and got lazy. Instead of sewing up a bag, I just cut down one large curtain to fit the pot. Without a clearly defined top with a drawstring it became a bit unmanageable. One section dropped into the pot causing grains to spill out of the bag. I had to go fishing with the strainer. The loose ends that hung over also dripped all over the floor. Yes, I did use clips on the rim but obviously not enough.

I worry about the stitches. I can see me having a blow-out since I don't sew. Both my grandmother and her mother were both seamstresses and members of the ladies garment workers union. I wish they were here now. I'd give them some beer for their help.

__________________
Cider123 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-26-2012, 09:58 PM   #8
MrSpiffy
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 280
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts

Default

Cider123, don't be afraid of sewing. It's not too hard, once you get the hang of it. It's hard to do it neatly, but not hard to do sufficiently for this type of application. Just plan out what you want to do first, and make sure to pin the seams ahead of time so they don't go all wonky on you as you're sewing. The hardest part is getting the machine up and running. (i.e. putting thread in it)

Here are photos of the stitching that I used.

Normal stitching was done by placing the two edges together, lined up. (Think taking the two sheets of fabric, one on top of the other. Edges flush with each other.) Then I used a fairly small straight stitch to close the seam. I then flipped the bag inside out so that the two pieces of fabric were folded over that seam, as you see in the pic below. Then I zig-zag stitched over that to really make the seam strong.



I also noticed a different stitch, where it appears that I also straight stitched after folding the fabric over the seam, and then also zig-zag'd over that. This stitch is on the seam going up the side of my bag. I'm not sure why I did that one differently. Either method should be fine, I'd imagine. Unless you're doing 10-gallon BIAB batches , I'd imagine this bag will hold all the grain you'll need.

__________________
MrSpiffy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2012, 04:57 AM   #9
KellyL
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Belleville, IL
Posts: 23
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

For a smaller application like yours why can't you use a 5 gallon paint strainer? I have used them for grain in partial mash batches and as hop bags.

Just curious, not critiquing.

Kelly

__________________
KellyL is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2012, 05:02 AM   #10
MrSpiffy
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 280
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts

Default

Excellent question! I tried paint strainer bags for a larger beer last time (1.070 OG), and I had to use two strainer bags. One couldn't hold 12-13lbs of grain. It ended up making a mess and was a PITA. This larger bag will let the grain move around more, and hopefully make things easier for me when I try brewing higher gravity beers.

__________________
MrSpiffy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sparge BIAB vs. Regular BIAB Efficiency traviswalken All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 20 10-06-2012 12:56 AM
made my own BIAB pinback DIY Projects 19 03-27-2012 02:40 AM
First AG BIAB. Pretty sure I made water. puter Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 25 08-22-2011 10:26 PM
A nice Podcast on BIAB from one of the Pioneers of BIAB gunner65 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 0 02-26-2011 12:24 AM
Never made wine but made tons of beer, have questions on the Orange Blossom Riesling Irrenarzt Wine Making Forum 8 06-13-2010 03:55 PM