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Old 04-10-2013, 05:38 PM   #11
kickflip_mj
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Its not like you are introducing any sugars, so it will not be a problem at all. I wouldn't worry about it at the moment, if it bugs you later you can change it out.

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Old 04-10-2013, 07:08 PM   #12
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Also are you guys pulsing at all?

I also would do a small run then stop, go to opposite side a repeat. Is that the preferd method on something like this? Just trying to keep warpage down. I didnt have any issues with that though.

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Old 04-10-2013, 09:48 PM   #13
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No need to pulse.
I've stated this before but I'll say it again.
The general rule is one amp for every thousandths of thickness. Your keg is about .050" thick so 50 amps would be the starting point. On thin walled material your better off starting at a lower amperage than higher. You can always go back over a weld a little hotter.
In my experience 40 to 45 amps is what I use.

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Old 04-10-2013, 10:09 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kickflip_mj View Post
First off I think you had the welder up really high, I use 1/16 gas lens/ 1/16 2% therated tungstin, and run about 30-45 amps max. (note I don't use a peddle so that changes things). Did you put a hole in the can to let the argon purge the air out? you may have also been adding to much filler. Also what I like to do is pull the wall out intended of but joint the fitting like you would if you were soldering the fitting. Check this forum out :

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=58247
You are better off letting the Oxygen purge the can thru the opening on the fitting you are welding in.
Make a small ball of steel wool and stuff it in the open end of the fitting you are welding in.
Hope that makes sense.

I'm not not trying to sound like I'm a know it all, but I have been welding stainless for 15 plus years to ASME B31.1 and B31.3 code.
Also API 1104 and AWS D.1
What I'm telling you is common in this trade.

The main difference in food and dairy from other standards is that welds made cannot be difficult to clean in a CIP system.

The welds made in food and dairy will have very little to no penetration and be very consistent on the root of the weld.
Food and dairy welders are very good at controlling the amount of penetration in their welds.
They cannot hinder a CIP system from being easily cleaned.
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Old 04-10-2013, 10:24 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmfa200 View Post
...The welds made in food and dairy will have very little to no penetration and be very consistent on the root of the weld.
Food and dairy welders are very good at controlling the amount of penetration in their welds.
They cannot hinder a CIP system from being easily cleaned.
Sorry bit confused with that comment, I thought for a weld for CIP use you would want full penetration (but not overdoing it). Don't you want the back side of the weld to melt and fuse together but not deposit a large "cap" of wled material that would be an issue to clean. In other words, you do not want the backside cut joint to be visiable, i.e. still look like two pieces butted up against each other, right?
Or am I misunderstanding what you meant - rereading I am thinking you are say - Full penetration but no convex protrusion on the back side of the weld?
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Old 04-10-2013, 10:43 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmfa200 View Post
No need to pulse.
I've stated this before but I'll say it again.
The general rule is one amp for every thousandths of thickness. Your keg is about .050" thick so 50 amps would be the starting point. On thin walled material your better off starting at a lower amperage than higher. You can always go back over a weld a little hotter.
In my experience 40 to 45 amps is what I use.
I had never seen that, good to know. I was just going off my guide and was on the high side. Never thought about it being better to be low and go back over if need be. Makes perfect sense. I am still pretty new to welding as I have only been doing it a couple years. Always good to learn new stuff. I will be trying again on my BK in the next few days and will post pictures of hopefully better looking welds.
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Old 04-10-2013, 10:46 PM   #17
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matt, I think that is what he means, but I am still a novice welder that has some bad days welding (today just turned into a mess). The outside weld is supposed to look like the inside weld when back gassed. But I still prefer to weld from the inside (my back is killing me welding the bottom of a 25 gal mega.lol

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Old 04-10-2013, 10:47 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmfa200 View Post
You are better off letting the Oxygen purge the can thru the opening on the fitting you are welding in.
Make a small ball of steel wool and stuff it in the open end of the fitting you are welding in.
Hope that makes sense.

I'm not not trying to sound like I'm a know it all, but I have been welding stainless for 15 plus years to ASME B31.1 and B31.3 code.
Also API 1104 and AWS D.1
What I'm telling you is common in this trade.
So here you are saying to put a small wad of steel wool into the fitting then the argon hose into the outside of the fitting blowing in and have the oxygen then argon go out the can on the inside of the keg?

I dont think you sound like a know it all, just someone that is experienced helping someone that doesnt know to learn and for that I say thank you.

Jake
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Old 04-10-2013, 10:49 PM   #19
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Drake9 - sorry for the off topic but - Did you go straight to TIG or have you had experience with Arc/MIG? How did you find the leraning curve? Asking as I would like to get a entry level TIG set and learn, have minimal experience with arc / no MIG, and wanted to see how hard it was to pick up.
I am probably going to need to sell my current AG setup to fund the purchase of welder and equipment for the new AG setup though

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Old 04-10-2013, 10:53 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kickflip_mj View Post
matt, I think that is what he means, but I am still a novice welder that has some bad days welding (today just turned into a mess). The outside weld is supposed to look like the inside weld when back gassed. But I still prefer to weld from the inside (my back is killing me welding the bottom of a 25 gal mega.lol
Wow that would suck
Yeah I have not even touched a TIG set (yet) but work in the FB indusrty as a project engineer/manager and have seen some very good work (and some shockers!). Best one was a test piece welding 2 pipes together, then it was cut in half, the thing looked like it had been welded both sides!
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