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Old 03-05-2011, 03:40 PM   #1
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Default Keggle Drilling: What Kind of Hole Saw?

I'm wore out from trying to drill a 1.25" hole in my HLT keggle for a water heater element. I'm up past 1" with the step bit, but this is taking FOREVER!

I have heard others refer to using a "hole saw". What kind of hole saw? It seems all I see are for wood or tile.

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Old 03-05-2011, 03:53 PM   #2
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Bi-metal hole saw.
Use cutting fluid or a lubricating oil or you'll dull the teeth, and waste your money and time.
Don't go wide open with the drill, and don't force the saw through the cut.
Use a moderate amount of pressure when drilling.

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Old 03-05-2011, 04:08 PM   #3
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If you've already used a 1" step bit you can't use a hole saw now... Just get a bigger step bit, that's what I used on the two kegs I have with water heater elements in them. Make sure to go slow, use a lot of pressure, and cutting oil.

Harbor Freight has a cheap step big that is big enough, worked for me.

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Old 03-05-2011, 04:12 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by conpewter View Post
If you've already used a 1" step bit you can't use a hole saw now... Just get a bigger step bit, that's what I used on the two kegs I have with water heater elements in them. Make sure to go slow, use a lot of pressure, and cutting oil.

Harbor Freight has a cheap step big that is big enough, worked for me.
I know I'll just have to work this hole out...but I have three more big holes to drill.

The step bit I'm using goes up to a little bigger than 1.25", it's just taking forever. I got spoiled drilling 7/8" holes, they don't take nearly as long.
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Old 03-05-2011, 04:20 PM   #5
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Ah ok, cool. I suggest a good quality bi-metal hole saw then. I ground the teeth right off my cheap one before even finishing the hole.

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Old 03-05-2011, 04:33 PM   #6
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A hole saw requires a small pilot hole, you are at that point of no return,, go buy another stepped bit and go slow with some lubricant

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Old 03-05-2011, 04:38 PM   #7
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I did three of them myself. I know EXACTLY what you are going through. Up to about 1" wasn't too hard. But that last 1/4" seemed to take at least half an hour. I honestly didn't think it was ever going to go through, and I was using cutting oil.

I had the harbor freight bit set and I think they are pretty soft. I got a Home Depot one ($$$) and it worked much better.

Good luck.

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Old 03-05-2011, 04:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpt_Kirks View Post
I'm wore out from trying to drill a 1.25" hole in my HLT keggle for a water heater element. I'm up past 1" with the step bit, but this is taking FOREVER!

I have heard others refer to using a "hole saw". What kind of hole saw? It seems all I see are for wood or tile.

I overlooked the fact that you would not be able to use a hole saw to finish the hole to size.
Sorry if my reply was misleading.
But a "bi-metal" hole saw can be used for future holes.
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Old 03-05-2011, 05:33 PM   #9
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You can make a wood pug, tapered, and drive it into the hole you started already, then use the hole saw. The pilot drill goes into the wood, and the hole saw does its thing.

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Old 03-05-2011, 05:47 PM   #10
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Definitely use a step bit, the hole saw jumps around too much and your going to end up with an ugly 1.25" hole. When drilling stainless use a lot of pressure, good cutting oil and slow rpms. I was told by a long time fabrication guy that the drill should be running around 60 rpms. I know that sounds slow, but it actually cuts really quick. The bit stays cool and sharp longer. And don't forget, if you think that you have enough oil down, put more as it keeps the bit cool.

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