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Old 12-15-2009, 12:01 AM   #1
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Default Keg tool

Even though I believe I am shooting myself in the foot here, I have thought about it a lot and, what the heck. I think the final straw on this came from a convo with the typical type and all they wanted to do was barder and cut my prices down. I don't get it. (It was no one from here)

Ok. Since I have shown pics of how I mod kegs for couplers, there has been much up roar in the threads the pics are posted in. I am guilty of not keeping the threads on track either. I have helped to steer the topic in those 2 (I think) threads from the OP. I didn't want those or other threads to get skewed. So I thought I would post a thread for it. I am still not going to tell how "I" do it. Please don't ask.

I will and I hope others will give to the discussion and come up with another way to do this that would be more easy for others to do this. For those with knowledge of working with stainless steel, some of this will be redundant.(sp)

Disclaimer, I am a weldor. I do not claim to be a metallurgist or have great knowledge in said field. I am the dummy holding the torch.

Pics of what I do. This is recent job I did for Splangy.
Drill holes. Good clean and not jagged in any way. I use a step bit.

The hole must be prepped for the weld.

I then do what I do to get the coupler through the side of the keg.

A view from the inside.

The couplers are purged and welded.

Stay tuned, I type slow. More to come.



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Old 12-15-2009, 12:27 AM   #2
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Now, this is really nothing new in the field of metal working. I haven't done anything special. Just applied a different technique.

As most know that when working with stainless steel you must be very carefull about what comes in contact with the stainless. Wire brushes are probly the biggest example of this. It goes for every thing. If a carbon source gets on the surface and the stainless gets to its magic temp of 800-1600 degrees, then it will become what is known as sensitized. The chromium in stainless is what makes it stainless. When the temp is elevated it can/will bond with the carbon. Your chromium has now become chromium carbide. You no longer have stainless steel. The only real fix is to do a solution heat treat on the material to get it back to where it once was. Since welding is a localized thing, the heat affected zone is the only area that is changed. This is why welds or any other areas exposed to the higher temps will rust. Stainless will rust anyway, this just speeds up the process. I think some have miss conception of stainless steel.

So, we must think about all things that come in contact with the stainless. Drilling we are pretty much screwed on. Every thing else we can controll. When hammering on stainless it is best to use a chunk of stainless. Iron will embed in the surface and that iron will rust.

So, DeapSea posted this.

Scroll down until you see the "bolt on series" (1018) steel.
This is how its done.
http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/showthread.php?t=796323

This is "not" how I do it. These are dimple dies. They are made of 1018. 1018 is mild steel. So IMO we cant use them. However, the idea can be used. I think it is a great place to start. We just need to change the material. Stainless was mentioned in the thread this was posted in. I myself would not make this out of stainless. After thinking about it today and what it does.......stainless might work. I am just not sure for how long. Stainless is a pretty soft material and I wonder about the profile holding up to the pressure. The two pieces of metal must slide past each other while being pressed into shape. Galling, to some extent might occur along with mushrooming of the profile.

One could make the dies out of stainless and then weld all over them to surface harden them. That might stop the defacing issue. IDK.

Well, I think that is more then a fair start.

Yes I know I typed "weldor". It is a clairification in text. Here is the first bit from wikipedia.
A welder (also weldor, which term distinguishes the tradesman from the equipment used to make welds) is a tradesman who specialises in welding materials together.



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Old 12-15-2009, 12:39 AM   #3
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Very nice weld!

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Old 12-15-2009, 12:40 AM   #4
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The tool is really neat. I like the idea of the whole thing. I kind of what to buy some even though I have no use for them right now. You know... just in case I do later...

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Old 12-15-2009, 12:50 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenMonti View Post
I am still not going to tell how "I" do it. Please don't ask.
If you want this thread to stay on track, that is a terrible disclaimer. I will venture to say that it's all we want to know about the topic.

Richard Finch would applaud your use of the term, "weldor."
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Old 12-15-2009, 12:54 AM   #6
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Sweet job!

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Old 12-15-2009, 12:57 AM   #7
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Without knowing any better, here's how I might try to accomplish such a pretty task:

First, looks like the hole size was a bit (yes, pun intended) smaller than the coupling used.

Next trick would be to find a SS coupling that is larger.... about as large at the outside radius of the final "draw". Not sure the exact term, but where the keg metal begins to flair up toward the fitting.

Set the nipple to be inserted inside, over the hole, with a bolt and large washer going all the way through, long enough to reach thru the second, oversized coupling placed on the outside of the keg. Add another monster washer (or plate with a hole in it) and a nut. Wrench on both ends until it draws the nipple thru the hole.

Nice looking work, btw.

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Last edited by Vinic; 12-15-2009 at 02:04 AM. Reason: thinking coupling, but wrote nipple
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Old 12-15-2009, 01:28 AM   #8
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I think I'd want it a little smoother on the inside so as to keep any break material from collecting in there.

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Old 12-15-2009, 01:34 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by conpewter View Post
I think I'd want it a little smoother on the inside so as to keep any break material from collecting in there.
I was thinking of this too. I am sure it wouldn't really be a big issue at all, but if you're already putting so much effort into it (instead of a no weld) I'd kind of want it perfect.
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Old 12-15-2009, 01:54 AM   #10
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I did some TIG welding year ago, I wonder if you could weld the inside without filler to fuse the coupler with the surrounding get material to create a smooth area that wouldn't collect junk. Of course welding inside the bottom of a keggle wouldn't exactly be fun.



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