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Old 07-21-2012, 09:30 AM   #11
BOBrob
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Seems some folks like good deals. I know a few brewers around here do. Word gets out among friends and we help each other out with good deals. The hot water trick works great! Cheers



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Old 07-21-2012, 02:43 PM   #12
cwi
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Seems some folks like good deals. I know a few brewers around here do. Word gets out among friends and we help each other out with good deals. The hot water trick works great! Cheers
Some folks also like to know why their beer tastes like crap, like the OP and the point of his thread.
All bev line is not the same, and the barrier bev line I am talking about is vastly different from the standard vinyl junk you got such a good deal on.
Before continuing to comment further, maybe read up a bit about the barrier line. I have given the full precise name, and another post has a link to an online HBS that carries it. Since it is both cheaper and better, there really is no excuse not to use it.


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Old 07-21-2012, 04:09 PM   #13
cwi
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A couple guys mentioned it being hard to install. Not sure if you use this method but it goes on like butter if you just put the end in HOT water for 30 seconds before installing. Makes it pliable and slips on easy.
I have a process that involves boiling water, which makes is relatively easy to install, but I wouldn't exactly say it goes on like butter. I have a metal cone to stretch it out first, enough to get it barely started, then multiple dips to get a 1/8" push or so each time. I found than dipping too deep, or dipping too long, softened too much line, and the line would collapse when I went for a push. For swivel nuts/barbs, you will also need some kind of male flare fitting to be able to push on the barb effectively.

There are small differences in the OD of different makes/runs of barbs. Even the shape of the barb makes a big difference. That may be why yours went on more easily. However, make sure you are using true 3/16" ID barbs. The naming convention in the bev world is more jacked up than plumbing parts. In most shops, a 3/16" barb is actually ~1/4" OD. It is meant to go on soft vinyl and keep the ID constant in the line/barb junction for less foaming and better flow. Some shops use the OD for their naming convention, so a 3/16" barb for them is actually a 1/8" ID.

For hard 3/16" line, like the barrier line, most shops recommend 1/8" barbs (1/8" ID, 3/16" OD), because it goes on easier. The price paid is a flow restriction, and foaming issues.

Going to the trouble of installing this stuff is well worth it. For a new installation it is a no brainer, considering it is both cheaper and better than using vinyl.
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Old 07-21-2012, 04:22 PM   #14
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.....
All bev line is not the same, and the barrier bev line I am talking about is vastly different from the standard vinyl junk
.
Hi

Right

Bob
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Old 07-21-2012, 05:19 PM   #15
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Hi

Right

Bob
Not sure what that means, since you originally suggested using 'thick walled tubing', which the barrier line definitely is NOT, but vinyl bev line is.

Accuflex Bev-Seal Ultra- It's not your father's bev line.

There have been many tests posted here on various brands/types of bev lines. They were done with water to get the true taste addition. No vinyl line was free from imparting a plastic taste. Some were just better than others about the length of time it took to become detectable, but were all less than 8 hours. The barrier line, which (from memory) is polypropylene with a PETE liner, went days without imparting any detectable taste. It also largely prevents gas permeation, both in and out.


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