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Old 03-30-2010, 03:11 PM   #1
hukdizzle
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Default Keezer builds and circulation fans.

I have seen a couple of examples of recirculation fans on here that were mounted to the lid of a chest keezer and I have been thinking of doing the same but at the same time I want to place it in the bottom of the keezer to pump cold air to the top of the unit and was wondering if any of you have some good ideas of placement for a fan?

I believe I am just gonna go with a 120v muffin fan and wire it directly into my ranco on the output side of the relay so that when the fridge kicks on the fan will as well. Any better ideas on that?

Thanks,

-huK

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Old 03-30-2010, 03:16 PM   #2
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Def. the right route using the 120v muffin fan, rather than messing around with 12v ones and having to strip a power supply. (Keeps it a lot neater.)

While it makes more sense physically to have the fan on the bottom (since cold air sinks, so that's where the coldest zone will be) I think the internals of a keezer are small enough that it doesnt' really matter - the fans not really forcing cold air up, per se, it's just keeping it circulating.

Also, a lot of folks pop it on the lid because there's no condenser coils to punch through.

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Old 03-30-2010, 03:21 PM   #3
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This looks like a nice fan but I am not sure what the temperature rating on these fans.

http://www.coolerguys.com/840556026389.html

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Old 03-30-2010, 04:32 PM   #4
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I have my 120 vac muffin fan mounted to the lid and it works just fine. I don't think the position of the fan is critical as it only needs to circulate the cold air. Mounting it on the lid also keeps it out of the way and away from any condensation that may accumulate. I've also found that running the fan full time works best. The fan I have is only 22 watts which I estimate to cost about 5 cents a day to run. I doubt you will find a temp rating on any of the fans and I wouldn't be concerned about it.

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Old 03-30-2010, 04:38 PM   #5
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Sounds like mounting it on the lid of the keezer is definitely the way to go. I guess I could either wire the fan into the ranco on the output or the input side of the ranco to get the desired results just to make it look clean. I did see on that site with the fan I mentioned previously that they do have an optional 2 prong plug that would make the setup sufficiently clean with a power strip I suppose.

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Old 03-30-2010, 04:50 PM   #6
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i have no data to be sure, but i would expect that the cost of running the fan continuously would be less than what you would save by running the fridge condensor more often for short times. cheaper overall to run the fan full time, and temp will be more even.

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Old 03-30-2010, 04:58 PM   #7
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Well with this 12W fan running constantly for 24 hours a day/365 days a year it would draw about 105.12kW. I haven't checked my latest power bill to see what a kW of power cost lately but I guess I could.

http://www.coolerguys.com/840556026389.html

I definitely agree with your opinion that operating the freezers compressor would draw more power than the fan and cost more in the long run.

I have this particular freezer but unfortunately they do not say how many watts the compressor draws during operation they only give the energy guide rating which won't be accurate once the temperature is kept well above 0'F.

http://products.geappliances.com/App...&Sku=FCM15SUWW

I am thinking now that running the fan full time is definitely the way to go and will give a more constant temperature within the freezer at all times.

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Old 03-30-2010, 05:28 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hukdizzle View Post
Well with this 12W fan running constantly for 24 hours a day/365 days a year it would draw about 105.12kW. I haven't checked my latest power bill to see what a kW of power cost lately but I guess I could.
Honestly, I never thought about running the fan 24/7, thinking that it wouldn't be efficient.

I had a look around and found an interesting article on a guy who converted a pretty common freezer and used a Ranco to control it to 38 degrees. He wasn't using it as a keezer, but as a replacement for a fridge, in an attempt to go as low energy as possible (looks like he was on solar and trying to go off the grid):

Quote:
Finally, I wanted to know what was actually going on with power draw, so I bought a Kill-A-Watt juice measuring device here. I’ve had everything hooked up for three days or so now, and here’s my take: As a proof of concept, it does work fine. The freezer, set to maintain a temperature of 38 degrees farenheit, does so. It uses about 350 watts per day, or more than three times what the Oz guy claims to get. Still, that is a gigantic improvement over a standard fridge
So he's using his freezer, without a fan, and drawing 350 watts per day. That 12W fan, running 24 hours, would draw almost that on it's own - 280 watts?
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Old 03-30-2010, 05:53 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ubermick View Post
Honestly, I never thought about running the fan 24/7, thinking that it wouldn't be efficient.

I had a look around and found an interesting article on a guy who converted a pretty common freezer and used a Ranco to control it to 38 degrees. He wasn't using it as a keezer, but as a replacement for a fridge, in an attempt to go as low energy as possible (looks like he was on solar and trying to go off the grid):

So he's using his freezer, without a fan, and drawing 350 watts per day. That 12W fan, running 24 hours, would draw almost that on it's own - 280 watts?
That is quite interesting... I actually plan on utilizing my Ranco to keep my chest freezer at 38'F as well. I think without a doubt that circulation of air within the chest freezer will allow shorter compressor running times and even though we're increasing our watt usage by 280 watts per day we are decreasing the compressor run time due to it not having to run as long to reach thermal equilibrium so we may be at a wash as far as power consumption is concerned.

If my assumptions are correct then I think the only thing we are left with are the well known benefits of utilizing a circulation fan within a keezer/fermentation chamber. I am definitely going to be installing one in my keezer and I think I will run it full time and see how everything goes.

Can you guys elaborate on how you affixed the fan to the lid of your keezer? I assume you guys didn't bolt all the way through the lid on the keezer, more likely you bolted/screwed it to the plastic panel inside? Pictures would be appreciated if you have them.

My plan so far is to mount the fan in the direct center above the deep section of the chest freezer. I plan to probably mount it with flow pointing upward to draw cold air up. I figure that using 1" aluminum stand offs between the fan and the inside of the lid should be enough room for the fan to distribute air to the top of the chest freezer.
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Old 03-30-2010, 06:51 PM   #10
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I used toggle bolts with some nylon spacers to mount the fan to the lid. I ran power to it with a section of lamp cord and one of the snap on type plugs. I have a power strip mounted on the wall behind the freezer which it and the freezer plug into along with some other stuff. I have the fan positioned to blow downward, but I doubt it makes any difference one way or the other.

It would probably cost you somewhere around $12 per year to run the fan full time. I also think that running the fan full time will be less energy efficient as you will be more uniformly cooling not only the freezer compartment, but also the shanks, taps and the collar itself. The cooling will be more uniform, but the losses through the collar etc will be higher. The compressor will likely run more frequently, not less. It does on my setup, but keeping the kegs,taps and beer lines uniformly cooled is important to me and worth any extra cost.

I am totally not convinced that running the little 12 watt fan 27/7 would come anywhere close to the cost of running the freezer compressor, of course, much depends on the ambient temperatures the freezer is countering. The fridge I have in my garage only very seldom runs during the cooler seasons. Using it in a garage during July in southern Arizona would be a different story, so as usual, it all depends.
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