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Old 03-06-2009, 07:58 AM   #1
MMasher
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Default jockey box copper VS. stainless

Going to make a jockey box any one have a outlook on copper VS. stainless for the coil will the copper make your beer taste funny, and is it ok to use refrigeration soft copper, or if I use stainless steel were to find the stainless for cheep



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Old 03-06-2009, 10:15 AM   #2
madewithchicken
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i am not sure how much the copper or the stainless would cost but i would buy a coldplate on ebay. they are about $100 and they work great. you can use them to run 6 kegs or daisy chain them and run 3 or even one.

i pulled mine out of the jockey box and put it in my mini fridge. so now my mini fridge can run 4 kegs (3 outside the fridge and 1 inside.)



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Old 03-06-2009, 11:58 AM   #3
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In general, the rule is no copper in beer. It's fine before it's fermented, but after fermentation you run the risk of copper poisoning. Stick with stainless.

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Old 03-07-2009, 10:58 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomebrewJeff View Post
In general, the rule is no copper in beer. It's fine before it's fermented, but after fermentation you run the risk of copper poisoning. Stick with stainless.
Thanks for telling me that it could went really bad, i will stick with stainless then
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Old 03-07-2009, 11:51 AM   #5
HomebrewJeff
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Here is some more info:

FDA/CFSAN FDA 1997 Food Code - Annex 3: Public Health Reasons/Administrative Guidelines

Quote:
4-101.14 Copper, Use Limitation.*

High concentrations of copper are poisonous and have caused foodborne illness. When copper and copper alloy surfaces contact acidic foods, copper may be leached into the food. Carbon dioxide may be released into a water supply because of an ineffective or nonexistent backflow prevention device between a carbonator and copper plumbing components. The acid that results from mixing water and carbon dioxide leaches copper from the plumbing components and the leachate is then transferred to beverages, causing copper poisoning. Backflow prevention devices constructed of copper and copper alloys can cause, and have resulted in, the leaching of both copper and lead into carbonated beverages.

Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc and contains lead which is used to combine the two elements. Historically, brass has been used for items such as pumps, pipe fitting, and goblets. All 3 constituents are subject to leaching when they contact acidic foods, and food poisoning has resulted from such contact.

The steps in beer brewing include malting, mashing, fermentation, separation of the alcoholic beverage from the mash, and rectification. During mashing, it is essential to lower the pH from its normal 5.8 in order to optimize enzymatic activity. The pH is commonly lowered to 5.1-5.2, but may be adjusted to as low as 3.2. The soluble extract of the mash (wort) is boiled with hops for 1 to 2½ hours or more. After boiling, the wort is cooled, inoculated with brewers yeast, and fermented. The use of copper equipment during the prefermentation and fermentation steps typically result in some leaching of copper.

Because copper is an essential nutrient for yeast growth, low levels of copper are metabolized by the yeast during fermentation. However, studies have shown that copper levels above 0.2 mg/L are toxic or lethal to the yeast. In addition, copper levels as low as 3.5 mg/L have been reported to cause symptoms of copper poisoning in humans. Therefore, the levels of copper necessary for successful beer fermentation (i.e., below 0.2 mg/L) do not reach a level that would be toxic to humans.

Today, domestic beer brewers typically endeavor to use only stainless steel or stainless steel-lined copper equipment (piping, fermenters, filters, holding tanks, bottling machines, keys, etc.) in contact with beer following the hot brewing steps in the beer making process. Some also use pitch-coated oak vats or glass-lined steel vats following the hot brewing steps. Where copper equipment is not used in beer brewing, it is common practice to add copper (along with zinc) to provide the nutrients essential to the yeast for successful fermentation.


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