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-   -   How did you install weldless hlt coil? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/how-did-you-install-weldless-hlt-coil-325971/)

bagpiperjosh 05-03-2012 03:37 PM

How did you install weldless hlt coil?
 
I would like to know how some of you installed you weldless hlt coils in your keggles. Im looking to eventually install a 50 ft coil of ss in my keggle and wanted to see how others did it

Bobby_M 05-03-2012 03:42 PM

I don't have a coil in my HLT but it's a rather simple bulkhead design. Take the 90 degree compression elbow that I sell, apply teflon tape to the 1/2" npt threads, thread a 1/2" locknut all the way down until it stops, push a silicone flat gasket down the threads next.

Install the fittings on the coil, preferably using silicone orings as ferrules rather than the stainless ones, drop the coil into the HLT and push the threads of both fittings into the holes in the HLT and apply whatever exterior 1/2" Female NPT fitting you want. The simplest thing would be two type A camlocks or a type A on the top port and a ball valve then type F on the bottom port.

CidahMastah 05-03-2012 04:10 PM

I just used bargainfitting's soldered bulkhead with a 90 degree stainless elbow and a straight compression fitting.

Female camlock to the outside post

Works great

PLOVE 05-03-2012 04:18 PM

Bargainfittings: Weldless bulkhead to 90 degree elbow to 1/2 compression fitting. FWIW, I found that a Hex coils made of 50ft of 1/2" refrigeration tubing wrapped around a corny pretty much filled my sanke keggle to the brim. I ended-up chopping my coil down to ~30-35 ft and it's a much better fit. Just something to consider if you can find a smaller coil.

bagpiperjosh 05-03-2012 07:28 PM

Id like to do it as affordable as possible. After all the fittings , coil and silicone tubing, quick disconnects, you are looking at a few hundred bucks

Bobby_M 05-03-2012 08:06 PM

Cheap. Fast. Good. Pick two.

The elbow compression fittings with some weldless add ons will be cheaper than separate bulkheads and compression. Judging by my own prices, it looks like $44 for the pair of compression elbows, $8.50 for a pair of locknuts, and $4 for a pair of silicone gaskets.

You could sweat some copper male adapters on the ends of the stainless along with a stainless washer to go really cheap but that starts tarnishing the big spend on the stainless coil.

static 05-03-2012 08:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bobby_M (Post 4054292)
You could sweat some copper male adapters on the ends of the stainless along with a stainless washer to go really cheap but that starts tarnishing the big spend on the stainless coil.

I'll be doing this for the exchanger in mine. I'm using copper though.

Bobby_M 05-03-2012 08:15 PM

For copper coils, I think it's a no brainer to skip the compression fittings IF you feel comfortable with the soldering.

static 05-03-2012 09:07 PM

Ya I'm good with sweating a couple of fittings. I use compression on copper all the time but this application the fewer the joints the better IMO.

bagpiperjosh 05-03-2012 09:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bobby_M
Cheap. Fast. Good. Pick two.

The elbow compression fittings with some weldless add ons will be cheaper than separate bulkheads and compression. Judging by my own prices, it looks like $44 for the pair of compression elbows, $8.50 for a pair of locknuts, and $4 for a pair of silicone gaskets.

You could sweat some copper male adapters on the ends of the stainless along with a stainless washer to go really cheap but that starts tarnishing the big spend on the stainless coil.

Plus the coil plus the quick disconnects plus 20 or so feet of silicone hose. And thats all before a pump. Lol. I understand you gotta pay to play but sheesh! I just finished my control panel


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