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Old 05-30-2009, 11:58 PM   #11
Dwain
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Default Cooler Photos 2

And here's the rest:
internal6.jpg

internal7.jpg

cooler1.jpg

service.jpg

service-2.jpg

I used about 18 ft. of 1/2" copper tubing. I didn't put any baffles in it. The black stuff around the connections is epoxy putty from HD, it was about $5.50. I did a test run with boiling water. The cooling water was at 74F. I'm not sure you can tell but, I did this using gravity feed. I'll build a nice rack and put wheels, etc. on it once I nail down my procedures. Here are the results:
1st run 210F to 104F
2nd run 104F to 92F
3rd run 92F to 77F
I didn't try to optimize my cooling water flow but the temp of the water stayed rock steady. It didn't matter if I was flowing hot water or not. Therefore, I know I have a lot of slop in the cooling water flow. Also, It's a little over 4' long. - Dwain



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Old 05-31-2009, 04:56 PM   #12
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Dwain,

Looks pretty good! You could vastly improve the performance using a pump. You'll get the quickest chill with the cooling water at max flow rate. It appears that you built it using only six copper pipes, but your chiller is longer, so the total length is close to the 20 ft I have in the original. I also noticed you used double 90 elbows joined with a short piece of pipe. You can make tighter bends if you use one 90 elbow and one 90 stree elbow. This eliminates the need for the short joining pipe and makes for a more compact configuration. The advantage of doing it this way is that you can fit more pipes inside the PVC. Baffles aren't really necessary IMO. There's sufficient turbulence without them. I'm sure there are a number of ways to improve the design, such as using baffles and such, but I'm not nearly as sure that these would be worth the effort. Instead of using epoxy at the connections, I simply threaded the PVC for 1/2" pipe thread. The wall thickness of the schedule 40 PVC is heavy enough to make that work. Instead of a rack of some kind, I just bungee the chiller to my stand vertically. It takes up less space and keeps it out of the way. I don't have any connectors on the bottom cap though, so the end can rest directly on the floor. Post back after you try it out with an actual brew session.

That's a pretty nice rig I see in the background. You must have a pump on it. I'm wondering why you aren't using it to pump wort through the chiller.



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Old 06-17-2009, 05:33 PM   #13
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After talking/typing with Catt he suggested I try my chiller mounted vertically. Here is my new (old) stand from a trashed George Forman grill. Good thing I don't throw crap out!

edit
don't know why the image won't show all the time

http://lh4.ggpht.com/_7Rsx1iGei14/SjknkeLpjeI/AAAAAAAAAqM/I7s1CDZe7CM/chilling%20tower2.jpg
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Old 12-29-2010, 11:25 AM   #14
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Reviving and old thread. I like this idea and I might build one, has another else built one that I can take a look at? For a part list it sounds like. I like the idea of vertical mounting. Thinking I will run the hose in at the top and out at the bottom. The wort in and out in the middle in a coupler. Initially this would be for 10g batches, but want room to expand. Think I will go with 36".

4" PVC ~2-3 ft
1 4" pvc coupler
2 4" pvc end Caps
~30 ft 1/2" rigid copper tubing
Some PVC fittings for mounting the hose
think I could use some pvc glue or thread them in permanently
~8 copper street elbows
~10 regular elbows
1/2" copper to some sort of thread
to attach the wort hose
some PVC Cement or whatever the glue is called
make sure to get the primer/conditioner too

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Old 12-29-2010, 03:13 PM   #15
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@milldoggy

It would be best to run the cooling water in at the bottom and out at the top. This way, the PVC water jacket will always be full and it will eliminate any possible air pockets. I run the wort both in an out at the top. There's little if any advantage to having the wort enter in the middle and doing it that way unnecessarily complicates the assembly.

I did not glue the end PVC end caps in place. They are secured with two small sheet metal screws through the caps and into the PVC. The caps fit tightly and do not leak. I wanted to be able to disassemble easily it if need be.

Here's the pics again:









Keep in mind that when full of water, this thing is heavy. The PVC is also fairly brittle, so you don't want to drop it. IOW, secure it well when in use.

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Old 12-29-2010, 05:43 PM   #16
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very nice, thanks for the pics! How do you have the copper hooked to the pvc? How does it go through the cap? It looks like the hot wort is going through pvc into the copper, does that concern you?

Have you timed how fast you can cool your wort? I assume you are using the pump to recirc the wort. I plan om using a pump to recirc and whirlpool the colded wort back into the BK.

BTW, I have a black server rack, just like yours, I like how you used that as a shelve, might have to steal the idea.

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Old 12-29-2010, 06:30 PM   #17
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this contraption is huge... i do not see that advantage of this over a traditional counter-flow chiller. Is this unit really that much more cost effective than a traditional counter-flow chiller DIY build?

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/cheycos-cfc-9395/

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Old 12-29-2010, 08:47 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milldoggy View Post
very nice, thanks for the pics! How do you have the copper hooked to the pvc? How does it go through the cap? It looks like the hot wort is going through pvc into the copper, does that concern you?

Have you timed how fast you can cool your wort? I assume you are using the pump to recirc the wort. I plan om using a pump to recirc and whirlpool the colded wort back into the BK.

BTW, I have a black server rack, just like yours, I like how you used that as a shelve, might have to steal the idea.
1. I used adapters to go from the copper to the cpvc. The adapters are just inside the end cap, so they are not visible. I was concerned that the copper would conduct too much heat and possibly melt the pvc as is passed through the cap. This concern proved to be unwarranted. If I were to do it over I would just go with copper pipe throughout.

2. It's cpvc and rated for use in domestic hot water systems, so I have no concerns at all about using it with hot wort.

3. The cooling rate is very fast, but is highly dependent on the temperature of the cooling water. During the cold months my tap water is near 42F and I can cool 12 gallons to below 140F in about 4 minutes or so and to 100F in a about 6-8 minutes IIRC. The total time to reach pitching temps near 70F is about 25 minutes. IMO, it cools as fast as any and faster than most other chillers.

4. I also pump the wort in a continuous loop through the chiller and back to the kettle, so the cooling times mentioned are using this method. The idea is to approximate something like Jamil's whirlpool method, but using a CFC rather than an IC. This isn't truly a CFC, but more of a hybrid. My goal was a very high flow rate for both the wort and the cooling water for faster chilling.

I'm planning to add a pre-chiller for summertime brewing. It will be built much the same way only I will use a 5 gallon bucket instead of the 4" PVC pipe so I have room for the ice.
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Old 12-29-2010, 09:00 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrewMoreBeers View Post
this contraption is huge... i do not see that advantage of this over a traditional counter-flow chiller. Is this unit really that much more cost effective than a traditional counter-flow chiller DIY build?

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/cheycos-cfc-9395/
It's not as big as it appears in the pictures. It's only 30" long and about 5" in diameter. It contains 20+ feet of 1/2" ID hard copper pipe. It probably is not more cost effective than a traditional tube-in-hose counter Flow chiller, but IMO it chills faster due to the higher flow rate. I had a tube-in-hose chiller that took way too long to cool the wort and was pretty much useless when circulating back to the kettle with a pump. The cost to build this was about $50, but the copper prices may have gone up since then. I considered building a tube-in-hose type CFC using large 1/2" ID tubing and a very large hose, but abandoned that idea after considering how bulky it would be and how hard it would be to tightly coil the larger copper tubing without kinking it. I'm thinking about building another one with 10 tubes instead of 8 and shortening it up a bit. There's room to do that inside the 4" PVC. I'm thinking I could make it 24" in length with 20+ ft of 1/2" copper pipe inside. That would make it a little more compact and also a little more efficient, in theory anyway. Mounted vertically as I have it, it takes up very little space. Actually, considerably less space than my old tube-in-hose thingy.
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Old 12-30-2010, 12:15 AM   #20
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Understood. Thanks for explaining.



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