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Old 03-10-2011, 02:38 PM   #11
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http://www.youtube.com/user/JOMalone3113?feature=mhum

I got 2 of the burners hooked up and thought I'd fire it up and see what kind of flame I was getting.

Let me know if this looks good. Also, what kind of difference could I expect with High Pressure orifices? (these are low pressure)

thanks

JM
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Old 03-10-2011, 03:38 PM   #12
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Flame looks good, the yellow streaks are from paint and other contaminants in the burner. The flame lifting above the burner surface is from too much gas/air flow because burner orifice is a bit big for the pressure. Turn the flame down until the light blue portion is touching the burner and then let them run a bit to burn in the paint. After burn in then adjust the air shutter until the very top of the flame starts to show a hint of yellow, this is the point where just enough air is mixing with the gas for complete combustion.
At this point a larger high pressure regulator is not going to help as you already have too much flow now, you would be better off using a Marshall 290 low pressure regulator to feed the gas manifold. With low pressure gas you will get more adjustability of the flame and still get maximum fire possible with those burners. With the low pressure approach you can use furnace valves for automation later without having to make many changes as regulator and burners are already setup.

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Old 03-10-2011, 04:07 PM   #13
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This thread name sounds dirty...sorry had to

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Old 03-10-2011, 04:15 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by kladue View Post
Flame looks good, the yellow streaks are from paint and other contaminants in the burner. The flame lifting above the burner surface is from too much gas/air flow because burner orifice is a bit big for the pressure. Turn the flame down until the light blue portion is touching the burner and then let them run a bit to burn in the paint. After burn in then adjust the air shutter until the very top of the flame starts to show a hint of yellow, this is the point where just enough air is mixing with the gas for complete combustion.
At this point a larger high pressure regulator is not going to help as you already have too much flow now, you would be better off using a Marshall 290 low pressure regulator to feed the gas manifold. With low pressure gas you will get more adjustability of the flame and still get maximum fire possible with those burners. With the low pressure approach you can use furnace valves for automation later without having to make many changes as regulator and burners are already setup.
Thanks for the help. I am using a 10psi regulator and it was fully open, should I possibly turn that down to limit the flow a little bit or just adjust the gate valve a little and leave the regulator on full blast?

Is there a big BTU difference between the Hi and low? I want to make sure that boiling in the kettle wont take forever. I am planning on mostly 6 gallon batches (7.5 pre boil volume), but thinking that I would be mixing in some 10 gallon batches along the way.
Would adding a High pressure valve to the BK burner increase the btus and make it boil faster?

Sorry for the nooby questions but I am not a gas guy...
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Cold Desert Brewing Company

On Tap: Berlinner Weiss (still...lol), Dickson County Pale, Evil Twin Clone (Hoppy Amber)

Fermenting: McFearless IPA (Apollo/Summit Hop Monster!)

Cold Conditioning: English Pale Ale (Yorkshire Square yeast)

In the queue: Munich Helles, Standard American Lager (My Fizzy, yella beer try), APA (10g split batch using diff yeast), ABA (Hoppy 7-8%, Imperial Janets Brown??? maybe), Saison (using WLP670 American Farmhouse), Terrapin Hop Karma Brown IPA Clone
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Old 03-10-2011, 04:16 PM   #15
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This thread name sounds dirty...sorry had to
lol...I giggle everytime I say or write orifice...I am way too immature for 33...

Love your reviews on YT, btw...and the Mikeller you just did that was flat, I saw a bunch of others that were very carbonated and I think you got a crap bottle...very sad to see what was probably a great beer have to be dumped...ever thought about getting a carbonation cap and putting the flat beer into a 2L bottle or something like that and carbing it w/ co2?
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Cold Desert Brewing Company

On Tap: Berlinner Weiss (still...lol), Dickson County Pale, Evil Twin Clone (Hoppy Amber)

Fermenting: McFearless IPA (Apollo/Summit Hop Monster!)

Cold Conditioning: English Pale Ale (Yorkshire Square yeast)

In the queue: Munich Helles, Standard American Lager (My Fizzy, yella beer try), APA (10g split batch using diff yeast), ABA (Hoppy 7-8%, Imperial Janets Brown??? maybe), Saison (using WLP670 American Farmhouse), Terrapin Hop Karma Brown IPA Clone
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Old 03-10-2011, 06:28 PM   #16
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I would suggest lowering the regulator pressure and try to get the pressure down to a point where the valves have to be nearly fully open to get the flame to lift off the burner. More pressure is a waste of time as you will just have to close the valve more to regulate the flame and keep it from lifting off the burner. The lower operating pressure will make fine tuning the valves easier when setting flame size as the change in the size of the opening in the valve has less effect. Switching to high pressure gas jet will make regulator pressure more important and valve adjustment more difficult as the gas flow needed is reduced with increased pressure.
You are going to find that the 6" burners will do about as much work as the larger burners as the bigger the fire under a keg, the greater the amount of flame up the sides that does not do anything other than burn things up and boil the sight glass.

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Old 03-10-2011, 07:08 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kladue View Post
I would suggest lowering the regulator pressure and try to get the pressure down to a point where the valves have to be nearly fully open to get the flame to lift off the burner. More pressure is a waste of time as you will just have to close the valve more to regulate the flame and keep it from lifting off the burner. The lower operating pressure will make fine tuning the valves easier when setting flame size as the change in the size of the opening in the valve has less effect. Switching to high pressure gas jet will make regulator pressure more important and valve adjustment more difficult as the gas flow needed is reduced with increased pressure.
You are going to find that the 6" burners will do about as much work as the larger burners as the bigger the fire under a keg, the greater the amount of flame up the sides that does not do anything other than burn things up and boil the sight glass.
Thanks, Kladue. I will make the adjustments you suggest. I am hoping to have the system up a running in the next couple weeks.
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Cold Desert Brewing Company

On Tap: Berlinner Weiss (still...lol), Dickson County Pale, Evil Twin Clone (Hoppy Amber)

Fermenting: McFearless IPA (Apollo/Summit Hop Monster!)

Cold Conditioning: English Pale Ale (Yorkshire Square yeast)

In the queue: Munich Helles, Standard American Lager (My Fizzy, yella beer try), APA (10g split batch using diff yeast), ABA (Hoppy 7-8%, Imperial Janets Brown??? maybe), Saison (using WLP670 American Farmhouse), Terrapin Hop Karma Brown IPA Clone
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Old 03-11-2011, 03:20 AM   #18
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I think it's important to point something out; something intimated but not said directly. Forgive me if I'm stating the obvious.
There is more to switching from high to low pressure than changing the orifice. In order to have a low pressure system you need a low pressure supply. Low pressure LP runs at 11" water column, or a little less than 1/2PSI. 10 PSI is considered high pressure, so right now you're running a high pressure supply through a low pressure orifice. if your regulator is adjustable, you might be able to crank it down far enough to get an acceptable pressure, but you'd be better off getting a proper low pressure reglator. That, or switch to high pressure orifices.

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Old 03-11-2011, 03:49 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisS68 View Post
I think it's important to point something out; something intimated but not said directly. Forgive me if I'm stating the obvious.
There is more to switching from high to low pressure than changing the orifice. In order to have a low pressure system you need a low pressure supply. Low pressure LP runs at 11" water column, or a little less than 1/2PSI. 10 PSI is considered high pressure, so right now you're running a high pressure supply through a low pressure orifice. if your regulator is adjustable, you might be able to crank it down far enough to get an acceptable pressure, but you'd be better off getting a proper low pressure reglator. That, or switch to high pressure orifices.
I appreciate you pointing this out. I was wondering. I may pick up a low pressure regulator at Lowes this weekend, they arent that high and see if it makes a difference. The 10psi reg I have now is adjustable and I was able to crank it down tonight and it looked even smoother than last night...

Thanks,
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On Tap: Berlinner Weiss (still...lol), Dickson County Pale, Evil Twin Clone (Hoppy Amber)

Fermenting: McFearless IPA (Apollo/Summit Hop Monster!)

Cold Conditioning: English Pale Ale (Yorkshire Square yeast)

In the queue: Munich Helles, Standard American Lager (My Fizzy, yella beer try), APA (10g split batch using diff yeast), ABA (Hoppy 7-8%, Imperial Janets Brown??? maybe), Saison (using WLP670 American Farmhouse), Terrapin Hop Karma Brown IPA Clone
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Old 03-11-2011, 03:39 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J-Malone View Post
I appreciate you pointing this out. I was wondering. I may pick up a low pressure regulator at Lowes this weekend, they arent that high and see if it makes a difference. The 10psi reg I have now is adjustable and I was able to crank it down tonight and it looked even smoother than last night...

Thanks,
Your flame looks ok to me. I'd be interested to know how softly you can run it though. It's got a great flame for heating and getting to boil, but I'd like to see/hear how it does for just simmering or maintaining a mash temp.
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