New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Going to make my own grain mill, figured Id see if anyone else needs one!




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-02-2011, 02:13 AM   #11
Flomaster
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Orange, Ca
Posts: 2,133
Liked 31 Times on 29 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default

Id love to get in on this test group if possible I am looking to going AG asap.

-=Jason=-



Flomaster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2011, 02:17 AM   #12
Zamial
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: WI
Posts: 3,177
Liked 165 Times on 147 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

If possible try and design it to be easily taken apart and assembled. This will save on shipping and you can sell it as "easy to clean" which IMO it needs to be.

Do not forget about lock washers, vibration can be pretty killer on this kind of stuff...



__________________
“I'm not drunk, I'm from Wisconsin.”
We have been out drinking your state since 1848!

Last edited by Zamial; 02-02-2011 at 02:20 AM. Reason: added thought...
Zamial is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2011, 02:35 AM   #13
mrfurlly
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: London Ontario
Posts: 81
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RonRock View Post
These guys have a great mill as far as I can see. Trouble is, they are in Australia. Cost way too much to get one to me in Iowa.

http://www.mashmaster.com/p/563201/millmaster-stainless-steel-grain-mill-.html

I especially like the adjustment setup, and the geared rollers. The Stainless rollers is also a good idea to keep rust off for those who keep their mill in a garage where temp change is a problem.

All in all, I think the best on the market. I would have bought one and paid more for it than I did my Monster Mill MM3-2.0. Although I will say that the 3 roller MM3-2.0 is a great mill and more than needed for a homebrewer (at least this homebrewer) I like overkill.
That is one serious mill. i just never thought there would be many guys in the market for a $500 mill!! Id like to get somewhere close to that exteme, but obviously keep the costs a little more reasonable. Id have to check on material cost, but a 2 3/4 inch stainless steel roller sounds pricey to me
__________________
mrfurlly is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2011, 02:54 AM   #14
Catt22
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 4,998
Liked 55 Times on 53 Posts
Likes Given: 51

Default

1. Yes, the mill should be adjustable and ideally, it should be adjustable on the fly. It's a major PIA to deal with eccentric bushings and feeler gauges, unfortunately, that's the way it's done with most of the commonly available mills. Most people just say phuk it and live with a compromise setting rather than bothering with the hassle of adjustments. Making adjustments according to visual inspection of the grist while the mill is running is mighty convenient IMO.

2. Hardened steel rollers are fine. IIRC, stainless steel is not as hard as carbon steel and I really can't see any advantage to using SS.

3. IMO, a third roller is not at all a necessity. My little single roller mill will produce grist as good or better than any malt mill.

4. Larger diameter rollers are better. The pinch angle is narrower which helps the rollers grab the grain more easily and the contact area is larger. This becomes obvious if you visualize giant rollers vs very tiny rollers. The downside is that more torque is required to run a mill with larger rollers. The same for very long rollers as you will be crushing more grain with each revolution of the rollers. Some kind of a compromise is unavoidable as usual.

5. Large hoppers are slightly more convenient, but the downside is that they take up more space in storage. Options for different hopper sizes would be good.

6. Now then, if you are planning to sell these mills for profit, the game changes due to market demands. The bling factor comes into play. Three roller mills are higher on the bling scale and so is stainless steel. Bigger is better too.

7. Motorizing is a must IMO, but selling a motorized mill presents some additional problems. It opens up the manufacturer to much more product liability should someone get injured. It might be difficult to get UL approval too. Might be best to leave the motorizing up to the end user, but definitely make it doable.

__________________
Catt22 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2011, 03:10 AM   #15
Golddiggie
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 12,047
Liked 467 Times on 414 Posts
Likes Given: 266

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrfurlly View Post
That is one serious mill. i just never thought there would be many guys in the market for a $500 mill!! Id like to get somewhere close to that exteme, but obviously keep the costs a little more reasonable. Id have to check on material cost, but a 2 3/4 inch stainless steel roller sounds pricey to me
Actually, you don't need to use stainless steel... A good grade of steel could substitute for it... Something like D2, D3 or maybe some AUS6 or AUS8 alloy steel (if you can get it) could be really good. Especially if you get it heat treated and tempered... I think a bigger factor will be finding a place to do the heat treat and temper, properly, with minimal distorting of the round bar. If you go with case hardening, that could work, provided it's done to a decent thickness of the material.

There are plenty of high grade steel alloys out there that will perform as well, if not better, than some stainless steel allows, as long as they are properly heat treated and tempered. I would stay clear of using aluminum for the rollers. Use either high grade precision bearings, or oil impregnated bronze bushings for the rotation of the rollers. Both should provide many hours of service. If you do as already suggested, and make the unit fairly easy to take apart, replacing those should be easy. You could even include a spare set in case they do need to be replaced at some point in the future. Probably cost less to include a spare set, then to ship them later.
__________________
Golddiggie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2011, 03:16 AM   #16
418Brewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Wichita, Kansas
Posts: 37
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

It would of course depend on how much it would cost, but so long as it's reasonable (something I can sell the wife on) I'd be interested in one.

If you can put a ballpark number on it I can say for sure.

__________________
418Brewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2011, 03:22 AM   #17
Kayos
disclaimers are sissy
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Kayos's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Santa Clarita, SoCal
Posts: 1,372
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

I am interested as well. I am in the market to get one soon anyway.

__________________
Being Dealt (kegged): Carbed Crystal light lemonade for the boys, Delta Bravo IPA, Applewinder
Primary: Climbing stout
Primary #2: ESB
Big Blind: Pucker Bitter
Small Blind:
Tasty Remembrances: White 'N Nerdy, Dynamite Red (Hop bursted), APA, The Bonaduce (irish Red), runners stout, ridgeback brown,

from my big ass computer sitting on my floor
Kayos is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2011, 03:24 AM   #18
Golddiggie
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 12,047
Liked 467 Times on 414 Posts
Likes Given: 266

Default

If you can sell it, to us at least, for under $150-$200 (USD) then I think you'll have more people buying them from here... If you include a definitive way to tell what the gap is in the rollers without using feeler gauges, then you'll have a huge leg up on the other crushers in the <$300 market.

As I've already mentioned, I NEED to get one before the end of this month... So if it's not going to happen by then, I'll already have a crusher... I would still like to be able to test whatever you come up with though.

__________________
Golddiggie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2011, 03:25 AM   #19
BrewBeemer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: far away with neighboring islands, \"Me Island\"
Posts: 3,504
Liked 20 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Sealed ball bearing roller journals supported not cheap shielded bearings or cheaper yet 841 oilite bushings most mills use even against rough tooled journals, this seen on a mill.
A solid means of locking your set clearance on the eccentrics and not by a steel thumb screw having the end rounded by hand resulting in egg shaped looking ends like done by hand on a 1" wide belt sander. This contacting against a radiused groove on the adjuster results every time of twisting eccentrics out of the set clearances once contacting and tightening down. This also will cause eccentrics to back out of their bores increasing roller end clearances depending on the contact of the radius on the thumb screws. Steel on steel invites eccentrics rotating, kiss off the mills set clearances.
I would use 2 1/4" to 2 1/2" diameter rollers, I like the 3 roller design at least 6" long with the drive stub large enough to support shaft side loading from a belt drive. This is where ball bearings shine doing their job vs side loading oilite bushing.
Grit, grain and dust entering bushings just doesn't sound right in the design.
Steel hardened rollers, stainless is overkill including added price, offer 10 and 20 pound hopper choices with threaded knobs for quick takedown, cleaning plus storage. That all said now all within a reasonable price. CNC, you lucky one.

__________________
BrewBeemer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2011, 03:30 AM   #20
BrewBeemer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: far away with neighboring islands, \"Me Island\"
Posts: 3,504
Liked 20 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 418Brewing View Post
(something I can sell the wife on)
That about sums up the whole brewing process from day one.


__________________
BrewBeemer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
DIY Grain Mill PDawg DIY Projects 16 06-06-2013 03:13 AM
What RPM do you run your grain mill at? Seabee John DIY Projects 100 03-05-2013 01:31 AM
DIY Grain Mill Idea. What Do You Think?? JewBrew DIY Projects 5 05-22-2010 04:05 AM
Something to DIY into a grain mill sjlammer DIY Projects 9 07-22-2009 12:38 PM
grain mill CAD? Gusizhuo DIY Projects 20 11-24-2007 05:40 AM