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-   -   "fixing" a keg lid opening (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/fixing-keg-lid-opening-364978/)

weaselchew 11-02-2012 06:01 AM

"fixing" a keg lid opening
 
I've been rather busy with some other projects and don't have an angle grinder, so I had someone else cut an opening in my keg for a lid for me.

The opening is a bit "out of round" so it looks a bit odd. They also cut the opening undersized (maybe 1/4" - 1/2" or so), so I have some wiggle room to enlarge it enough to fit the lid I have. Has anyone here repaired their keg from a similar issue?

I was thinking of making some sort of wooden jig that would sit over the upper skirt portion (or whatever it is called, with the cutouts for handles) that could hold a marker or scribe at the correct distance to mark a line to grind/sand the opening. I think the skirt has a bit of a bend to it, so it also is not likely completely round.

Any other ideas? Maybe even just a straight board that can fit against the skirt on the inside that i could use to space a marker/scribe/cutter at the proper diameter?

As far as cutting goes, I'm guessing my best bet would be to actually go buy an angle grinder? I do have a dremel, but that would take forever.

Icenine61 11-02-2012 09:41 AM

Use a marker on a string to cut a perfectly round piece of cardboard the size you need.

Center that on your keg and make your line. Then you can free hand it or make a jig. Grab an angle grinder you will find uses to make it pay for itself. A cutting wheel is necessary, a flap wheel is really nice to have.

bknifefight 11-02-2012 01:44 PM

I traced the bottom of a 5 gallon bucket on the top of my keg. It was a nice, round, 12" hole, which is perfect for the lid I had.

crane 11-03-2012 02:45 PM

Whether you use a bucket, cardboard, or the lid you mentioned you already have to mark the correct sized circle on there is the easy part. If you go with an angle grinder you are going to have a difficult time free handing it and staying on your line. If you are lucky you can rest the back of the angle grinder on the skirt and it will be the correct distance to your mark. You may be able to flip it around and zip tie some pieces of wood to it to set the correct distance in from the skirt.

Your other option would be to mark your cut and take it to a shop and have them plasma cut it for you.

runningweird 11-03-2012 03:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crane (Post 4555164)
Whether you use a bucket, cardboard, or the lid you mentioned you already have to mark the correct sized circle on there is the easy part. If you go with an angle grinder you are going to have a difficult time free handing it and staying on your line. If you are lucky you can rest the back of the angle grinder on the skirt and it will be the correct distance to your mark. You may be able to flip it around and zip tie some pieces of wood to it to set the correct distance in from the skirt.

Your other option would be to mark your cut and take it to a shop and have them plasma cut it for you.

exactly the advice I was going to give. I have cut three of them, the last two I used a simple jig and loved the results. My first keggle has a hole that is a bit jangly - but it isn't sharp and works for my boil kettle.

some pictures would be great!

crane 11-03-2012 03:24 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I recognized the difficulty in getting a nice clean cut without a jig so I did my research and ended up with this.



Attachment 82200


I already had the angle grinder, hole saw, scrap 2x4 and zip ties. I just needed to get a new cutoff disc and I was in business. I have cut 2 tops off so far and the both turned out great. I went back with the dremel to sand off the burs.

weaselchew 11-06-2012 06:14 AM

1 Attachment(s)
It's a bit late to build a jig that works off the center opening, it's already cut off.

You can see the hole isn't exactly "round" although it's not terrible. From what they said, it was cutting relatively correct until the end. They drilled 2 holes in the top and used some sort of mechanical "nibbler" to cut through it.

Icenine61 11-06-2012 06:37 PM

While not terribly efficient, in this case it would probably be easiest just to grind to your lines, then flap wheel it smooth.

krazydave 11-06-2012 09:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Icenine61 (Post 4564040)
While not terribly efficient, in this case it would probably be easiest just to grind to your lines, then flap wheel it smooth.

+1

It'll take longer, but you'll be cussing a lot less.

haeffnkr 11-06-2012 11:50 PM

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/any-...ly-out-347516/

Just do this and cut out the lip enterly...you will be happy when you are done.

Thanks Kevin


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