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Old 07-05-2010, 08:14 PM   #11
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I used 1/2 outer diameter refrigerant copper.
I used lead free solder "Silver something.." My first time working with copper and didn't have any problems.

Fittings for 3/8" fit perfectly. The 2 towers are 1/2" inner diameter copper.

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Old 07-06-2010, 01:12 AM   #12
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water will take the path of least resistance when it gets to the t it has a choice and it will always choose the easier path so I'm afraid you will be getting flow through one of the coils at a good rate and the other not so good may be better to put them in series.

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Old 07-06-2010, 10:17 AM   #13
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water will take the path of least resistance when it gets to the t it has a choice and it will always choose the easier path so I'm afraid you will be getting flow through one of the coils at a good rate and the other not so good may be better to put them in series.
I think you're correct Danger. This is why my coils are connected in series. The water will flow the same across the entire chiller.
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Old 07-30-2010, 10:37 PM   #14
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water will take the path of least resistance when it gets to the t it has a choice and it will always choose the easier path so I'm afraid you will be getting flow through one of the coils at a good rate and the other not so good may be better to put them in series.
Quote:
I think you're correct Danger. This is why my coils are connected in series. The water will flow the same across the entire chiller.
I don't think a series connection would be very efficient. The single coil that most people use already discharges hot water. A second coil in series would simply start with the hot water discharge from the first coil. Running your cold water into both coils simultaneously as you have would be more efficient. But Danger may have a point regarding this particular setup. The water enters the top section of the T, and runs straight through the T into one coil. The other coil path is a 90 degree turn off this main water channel. If Danger is correct, it might be better if the T had the water supply entering at the bottom and then split left and right into the two coils. Same with the discharge. I am planning to build the same and use 5/8" OD tubing (1/2" nominal pipe size) into the bottom of the T and reduce down to 3/8" OD tubing (1/4" nominal pipe size) on the two legs of the T.
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Old 07-30-2010, 10:56 PM   #15
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water will take the path of least resistance when it gets to the t it has a choice and it will always choose the easier path so I'm afraid you will be getting flow through one of the coils at a good rate and the other not so good may be better to put them in series.
I'm looking to build my wort chiller here soon. I really like this concept. Obviosly series makes more sense, but my only question to follow is after a certian distance isn't the water inside the chiller equal to the temp of the wort itself thus no longer giving any additional benifit? Could using this design endup just taking more space without added benifit, or am I missing something? Still it would make one heck of a pre chiller for the eventual CFC upgrade.
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Old 07-30-2010, 11:00 PM   #16
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Sorry, didn't see that Rgray beat me to the punch.....

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Old 07-30-2010, 11:33 PM   #17
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it might be better if the T had the water supply entering at the bottom and then split left and right into the two coils. Same with the discharge. I am planning to build the same and use 5/8" OD tubing (1/2" nominal pipe size) into the bottom of the T and reduce down to 3/8" OD tubing (1/4" nominal pipe size) on the two legs of the T.
I think you are right that would be more efficient.

But question, wouldn't the water pressure coming from the hose plus the resistance of the water already in the coil that is in the T-straight across from the source force enough water down the 90 degree turn? My guess would be that if you turn the water on high enough, you would get maximum flow through both coils....
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Old 07-30-2010, 11:47 PM   #18
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What is the inner coild was of a larger diameter, that would change the resistance in that coil, is there a point where we could find equalibrium?

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Old 07-30-2010, 11:50 PM   #19
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I think you are right that would be more efficient.

But question, wouldn't the water pressure coming from the hose plus the resistance of the water already in the coil that is in the T-straight across from the source force enough water down the 90 degree turn? My guess would be that if you turn the water on high enough, you would get maximum flow through both coils....
If it was a closed pressurized system, definitely. (Pascal's Law combined with 15 years turning wrenches on military aircraft hydraulic systems). With an open system concerned with flow volume and not pressure, I don't know. My idea for T-fitting orientation just "seems" reasonable enough to build it that way. But the original poster is having success so who knows. My limited scientific knowledge just has me using the 5/8" garden hose into a 5/8" copper tube, then split the flow about in half into two 3/8" tubes. Again, sounds reasonable.
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Old 07-31-2010, 12:23 AM   #20
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rgray58 that makes sense. Besides, who can have a problem with bringing wort temps down to 80 in 6 minutes? better than me. I have a traditional immersion chiller that gets me to 100 quick but beyond that, it is tough. Currently, my ground water temp is in the mid 70's. Next up, build a pre-chiller that I can drop into a bucket of icewater once I hit 100.

Cheers!

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