The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Draft Beer Tower at the Kitchen Sink

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-02-2012, 03:07 AM   #11
leatherfacegoon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: North East, Maryland
Posts: 12
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts

Default

I didn't get as much done over the weekend as I had hoped. Taking in football with friends at some of the local watering holes put a damper on progress. I did get everything plumped in except the CO2 tank because I forgot to grab a line for it. But all that needs to be done for that is to slip the line on past the barbs and tighten down the pipe clamp.

I built the collar very similar to what many people have done. I used pieces of wood that I had laying around from previous projects, hence why I used presure treated 2x6's for the section that sits on top of the freezer. I used 2.5" wood screws to screw all the pieces together and 1.25" wood screws on the corner gussets. I cannot stress enough to use a square and level to make sure what you are building is indeed square and flush. Once I had the inner part of the collar assembled I attached small 0.25" shims to 3 of the sides so that I could attach the 2x10 boards on those three sides. Once I had that done I put down two layers of 1.25" wide x 0.4375" thick weather stripping on the inner collar side that would be resting on the freezer. I then flipped the collar right side up and placed it on the freezer so I could attach the lid. Before I removed the lid I put a screw through each hinge. I did not have to create my own hole for the screw because there was already a hole there for this purpose. This helps to take some pressure off the spring so you do not have to fight it. Once I had the collar assembled and right side up I put the door back on making sure it was square and flush.

Now it was time to build a wall to hold in the spray foam. I used all the scrap wood I had left over to make the other sides of the form. Once I had that done, I sprayed the foam insulation in all the cracks and even a bead n the inside where the collar sits. I am trying my best to keep it air tight to prevent moisture issues. I let the foam set up for almost a whole 24 hours before I resumed work. Next up I trimmed the insulation and removed the form. Starting to take shape now. I then mounted the CO2 pump panel and drilled holes for all the hoses - CO2, trunk line and both glycol lines. I used a 3" hole saw for the trunk line and a 1" drill for the other holes. I did this to keep the holes as small and snug as possible to help prevent moisture issues, and this made fishing hoses with insulation on them a pain. After playing around with each hose for more than I would have liked to, they all were fed in and cut to the appropriate length. This doesn't even come close to how much of a pain working under the kitchen sink was. All of the lines inside/outside of the keezer are secured on the barb with hose clamps and insulated all the way into the keezer. The only thing I did not do was tape the glycol lines outside of the keezer...I really didn't feel like looking around for duct tape. Anyhow, here are pics to match all that I said for an update.

Screw holding the spring back on the hinge:



It's hip to use a square!


Collar assembled with weather stripping on:



Collsr right side up:


Note the spacer:


Bead of silicon to help keep moisure out:


Hinges attached using the paint stirring from a 5 gallon bucket as an offset (needed to help lineup the lid with the collar):


One layer of foam board insulation installed:


Spray foam after the form has been completed:


Trunk line fed through:


CO2 pump panel mounted:


Trunk line insulation stripped away to expose the lines, with 2 product lines hooked up, secured to the wall with pipe hanger strap:



Glycol lines hooked up:



All closed up with the CO2 tank waiting for its line....


Tomorrow I hope to tackle the CO2 tanks line and run the electrical. The glycol unit needs its own dedicated 20 amp service and I need to run power for another out that powers the freezer and my water softner/conditioner. I am close. Once I do that I plan to use the temp control on the freezer to take care of the kegs. I will have to adjust the coarse temp setting on the compressor to get above freezing and then use the fine adjustment to tweek it. I guess I will be borrowing a thermocouple reader from work...

__________________
leatherfacegoon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-02-2012, 11:39 PM   #12
Junkster
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: North Central, Ohio
Posts: 508
Liked 30 Times on 21 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

If I had a setup like that I think I would ENJOY washing the dishes. But, I'm too lazy so paper plates and the keezer in the cellar works!

__________________
Junkster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2012, 03:19 PM   #13
Cpt_Kirks
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lakeland TN
Posts: 3,737
Liked 44 Times on 39 Posts

Default

That's just CRAZY.

I LOVE IT!

__________________
Cpt_Kirks is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2012, 03:23 PM   #14
GilaMinumBeer
In yo' garage, steelin' yo parts.
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
GilaMinumBeer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Oblivion
Posts: 46,864
Liked 4604 Times on 4299 Posts
Likes Given: 55

Default

I'd have still rigged a way to run the sprayer feed into the tower/lineset for cleaning/flushing.

__________________
GilaMinumBeer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2012, 03:35 PM   #15
QuaffableQuips
G'suffa!
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
QuaffableQuips's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Fort Collins, CO
Posts: 385
Liked 24 Times on 21 Posts
Likes Given: 31

Default

This is fantastic! Can't wait to see pictures of the first pour.

__________________
QuaffableQuips is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-07-2012, 04:19 PM   #16
joenads
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: summerville, sc
Posts: 118
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Well done Nate. I gotta see this in person sometime!

__________________
My E-Herms-build
joenads is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-08-2012, 12:35 PM   #17
leatherfacegoon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: North East, Maryland
Posts: 12
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts

Default Update with more info

I have everything done and a 1/2 keg of Yuengling and a 1/6 keg of Arrogant Bastard on tap. Still playing the pressure game with the CO2 to get a good pour. I think I was too anxious last night and wanted a perfect pour as soon as I got the kegs out of my truck and into the basement, even if they were a little shook up from the ride and dolly ride to the basement. I started with the pressure at ~12 psi. Too low. I let the kegs settle some but kept incresing the pressure. Not sure exactly where I stand right now, but I would bet it is just under 20 psi. The supply regulator is at ~45 psi. The reason the supply regulator is so high is because the CO2 pumps use CO2 to power the pumps. Once the gas is inside the box it is split and that is why there are two regulators, one each for the respective lines. Onwards to info!

To adjust the temperature of the freezer I used the coarse setting screw.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/guid...ontrol-249612/
I had to work at it for about a day before I got the temperature in the upper 30s.


This is the layout provided by Perlick. It didn't work for me because I was not attaching to a flat surface. I used a ruler and compass to translate the dimensions to my sink top.


This is what is going on in the tower. Awesome diagram that captures it all. The line on the left hand side has the trunk line coming up to connect to the tower. What I did not know about are the restrictors that go in a piece of tubing between the tower and trunk line. I used 12 in each of my lines and then used a clamp to hold them in place so that they don't move too far with the flow of beer and do not settle too much without the flow of beer. Once again, good document that shows you what the hell is going on.

Now for the CO2 pumps:







ANy questions, feel free to ask. All that they do is pump the beer up the 10 feet or so of vertical distance. Do I use more CO2 in the process, yes. I am OK with that though. It was either use pumps or beer gas. I figured I would try these out.

On to the glycol chiller and boy does it keep the beer cold. When I checked the tower last night it was chilly! It is set to 34 degrees F and when the temperature of the glycol raises 4 degrees the compressor kicks on and chills the glycol back down to 34.








Perlick also provides a test sheet of the glycol chiller showing the current draw and temperature.


After golf today, I hope to work out any kinks with the system as the guys run it through more beer than I can by myself. I am sure that the pressure will need to be tweaked a little more but other than that it is up and running. Waiting to get a good picture of a good pour. I did not feel like showing my first pour of 95% foam....

__________________
leatherfacegoon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-08-2012, 09:27 PM   #18
evandena
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 813
Liked 17 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Any idea what that chiller will cost to run for an average month?

__________________

My YouTube Channel:
http://www.youtube.com/user/evandena/videos

evandena is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2012, 12:14 AM   #19
leatherfacegoon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: North East, Maryland
Posts: 12
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Well...power is equal to current times voltage. So to give you a rough stimste at 120 volts over one hour is a half hour if running. So I would guesstimate over an hour to be 960 watts. To figure how much it costs for a month multiply the 960 watts by the kw hour.

__________________
leatherfacegoon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-15-2012, 08:32 PM   #20
leatherfacegoon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: North East, Maryland
Posts: 12
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Well, I am done. Pouring beers without a problem now.



Cheers!

__________________
leatherfacegoon is offline
jholder Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help: Dream of Tap at my Kitchen Sink FreakinOutrage DIY Projects 2 04-30-2012 05:58 PM
Kitchen Sink Sprayer to Wort Chiller Splice exe DIY Projects 9 09-24-2011 02:59 AM
Tower at kitchn sink brianj434 DIY Projects 21 05-07-2011 07:57 PM
Kitchen Sink Faucet to Dispense Beer??? Bullka DIY Projects 9 08-14-2010 06:12 AM
The Kitchen Sink Sawdustguy DIY Projects 20 01-09-2010 12:34 PM