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Old 01-27-2011, 02:35 PM   #1
EKennett
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Default Cutting Mitres for a keezer collar

Alright guys, I'm getting going on my second keezer (RIP first keezer). My first had a tower but this one will have a collar. I built a top and platform for the first one and had a pretty hard time with the mitres. There were a bunch of spots I was way off and needed filler pieces and putty to make right. I'd like to not do that with my collar. I picked up a piece of Red Oak that cost 40 bucks so I would really like to not screw up this piece of wood. Any tips on cutting my mitres? I have a Mitre saw and a circular saw with an angling fence. I also have a table saw but I don't think it's big enough for my boards.

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Old 01-27-2011, 02:38 PM   #2
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if you have a miter saw whats the problem?

set it at a 45° angle and measure twice and cut once.

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Old 01-27-2011, 02:40 PM   #3
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Set the miter saw to cut at a 45 degree angle. Should produce accurate 90 degree corners.

If your miter saw can't handle the size of the board, set your circular saw angle to 45 degrees, and draw a straight line to follow across the board.

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Old 01-27-2011, 02:41 PM   #4
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if you have a 10" table saw and it tilts to 45, it should be able to miter a two-by...

How thick is the red oak?

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Old 01-27-2011, 02:56 PM   #5
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Sorry, I actually got 1x8 oak.

I'm wondering if I should be making my measurements on the inside of the mitred edge or the outside. I'm thinking that if I want the collar to be flush with the lip of the keezer I should measure the outside of the mitred edge.

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Old 01-27-2011, 03:00 PM   #6
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the top of you keezer SHOULD have a lip at the edge where the lid meets. you want your longest cuts to be to those measurements.

say your freezer has dimentions of 2' x 3' yet that lip is lets just say its 1/4" thick. it would mean you are going to build your collar to

1foot 11-1/2" x 2 foot 11-1/2"

if you are unsure on how to use your saw buy some cheap 2x4' or even cheaper wood and make a practice collar


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Old 01-27-2011, 03:29 PM   #7
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Cut and fit each board one at a time for best results. Double check that the saw blade angle is accurate and sharp. IMO, it is preferable to have a nice clean and tight butt joint rather than a sloppy mitered joint.

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Old 01-27-2011, 03:51 PM   #8
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Like Catt22, I would also suggest verifying the angle - the gauges on tools are not particularly accurate, and stops are not a guarantee. Set the blade where you think 45 is, cut a test piece into two pieces. Flip one of the two pieces to make a 90 joint, and check with a square.

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Old 01-27-2011, 04:39 PM   #9
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If your miter saw can handle an 8" plank, than that is the way to go. I know some smaller models can only do up to 6". If this is the case you would get a cleaner cut with the circular. Which ever one you choose, do like jester said, verify the angles on some scrap. If you are worried about you circular saw cuts being straight, over shoot your line by a 1/16" and sand to perfect.

I don't recommend the table saw as any height variation in the end opposite the blade will effect you angle.

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Old 01-27-2011, 05:00 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EKennett
Alright guys, I'm getting going on my second keezer (RIP first keezer). My first had a tower but this one will have a collar. I built a top and platform for the first one and had a pretty hard time with the mitres. There were a bunch of spots I was way off and needed filler pieces and putty to make right. I'd like to not do that with my collar. I picked up a piece of Red Oak that cost 40 bucks so I would really like to not screw up this piece of wood. Any tips on cutting my mitres? I have a Mitre saw and a circular saw with an angling fence. I also have a table saw but I don't think it's big enough for my boards.
Cut four short pieces at 45's same length cuts on both ends. Rough assemble and you should have a perfect square.

This technique multiplies error, so you will see the slightest of misalignments. Good luck
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