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Old 09-10-2010, 02:12 AM   #1
pretzelb
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Default Connecting collars to freezers

I'm about to get my GE 7.2 cu ft freezer and at some point I will probably make a collar for it. I've seen some pictures but one thing I'm not clear on is how do you connect the collar to the freezer? Seems like most people use the hinges to connect the lid to the collar, but I don't see what connects the collar to the fridge. If you don't, I would guess the entire collar would tip over when the lid is opened.

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Old 09-10-2010, 02:23 AM   #2
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Just use a good quality silicone between the collar and the top part of the freezer. The weight of the collar plus the lid and the adhesive quality of the silicone will keep it real snug. Plus, if you ever want to convert it back to a freezer, no damage done, you just have to remove the silicone.

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Old 09-10-2010, 02:23 AM   #3
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L brackets

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Old 09-10-2010, 02:35 AM   #4
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I used rope type weatherstripping caulk like this:

http://www.hardwareandtools.com/M-D-Building-Products-71522-Rope-Caulk-30-Feet-Gray-3439247.html

It's sticky and has the consistency of stiff modeling clay. It's easy to tear into strips of the desired width and cut to the desired length. It will fill minor gaps due to imperfections in the wood collar and it's adhesive properties are sufficient to hold the collar firmly in place. I like that it would be easy to remove if desired. The freezer lids are normally hollow and very light weight. The weight of the collar is usually more than enough to easily counter the weight of the lid and hinge spring tension when opening it. I chose 2 x 6 lumber for the collar partly for the added weight over thinner material. I have nothing else at all but the caulk attaching the collar to the freezer. No brackets, no screws and no glue. No problems either and it's been in use for quite awhile.

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Old 09-10-2010, 02:53 AM   #5
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I used silicone chaulking and it holds up well and is waterproof to avoid condensation setting in.

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Old 09-10-2010, 05:05 AM   #6
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I just used silicon caulk and so far, so good. I'm sure the other options would work well too

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Old 09-10-2010, 12:08 PM   #7
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Not trying to hijack this thread, but now I'm confused

Do you recommend connecting (with silicone or whatever) the collar to the freezer or the collar to the lid?

I've built a collar but not installed it because it looked to me like I would need to connect the collar to the lid, which looks like a lot of work. So, another clarifying question is; is the answer to the previous question determined by the height of the collar?

I've made a short collar using 1x2 because I just want to run CO2 into the keezer. I'm not running faucets through here. The inspection of the hinges leads me to believe that unless I made a 6" or taller collar that I could not move the hinges up high enough to not require drilling into the freezer (all bad) to mount the hinges. Any collar less than the height of the hing body (currently attached to the freezer, not the lid), would necessitate fastening the collar to the lid. Am I over-analyzing this? I just don't want top screw up a brand new freezer.

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Old 09-10-2010, 12:52 PM   #8
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With that small of a collar you will probably have to drill into the fridge. Most people take off the hinge and use the existing holes in the top and base and drill the new holes in the collar. The only way I see around that is to make a tiered collar with the 1x2 where it is now and like a 1x4 outside of that the would allow the whole collor to fit on the top like a lid that wasnt really attached. you could then drill into the 1x4s with the hinge. you would have to be a little careful to not open the lid too far because the the hole lid would on be attached by silicon or something.

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Old 09-10-2010, 01:20 PM   #9
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I chose to attach the collar to the freezer body. The hinges attach to the collar, but they are only fastened with the four upper screws as the bottom in or so of the hinge extends past the bottom of the collar. No big deal as the four screws in each hinge is more than secure enough.

Others have attached the collar to the lid which makes it easier to lift kegs etc in and out of the freezer and moves the taps out of the way at the same time. I'm not a fan of that configuration, but apparently it works well for many.

If your only objective is to run a CO2 line into the freezer, I would simply drill a hole through the back edge of the lid. Angle the hole downward so it penetrates the lid liner and you are in. I would use a smaller gas line than normal. The most common gas line is 5/16" ID and something like 7/16" OD. It's way fatter than it needs to be. I would switch it out with something smaller so that you don't have to drill such a large hole. The gas line need not be anything special either. I'd use ordinary 1/4" ID PVC or vinyl tubing from Home Depot or the like. Save yourself some grief and skip the collar until the day you decide to install come taps.

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Old 09-10-2010, 04:52 PM   #10
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I guess I will know more after my freezer arrives but I would think that caulk wouldn't be enough to hold the collar in place. The collar plus the lid is going to be a good amount of weight and when that lid goes up it seems like it would put a lot of weight on the back and pull the collar up from the front. This would seem to get worse when you have the lid open and are trying to move around kegs and bumping things around. I could try L brackets I guess but that would mark up the freezer if I want to sell it. I wonder if some vertical slats attached to the collar then running down into the freezer a few inches might help avoid a tip over.

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