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Old 11-19-2012, 05:28 PM   #31
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I'm considering shortening the stand or moving the legs in 2 inches lengthwise so that it fits in the bed of a short box Ford Superduty truck. They are 80 inches from the lip on the top of the front of the box to the surface of the tail gate when its closed. My stand is currently 82 inches in that dimension.

Shortening it would mean it could be moved with a short box truck with the tailgate closed. Otherwise I'd probably have to take the tailgate off, which is a pain.

Its not too late to do this. 4 cuts to shorten the whole stand 2 inches, 2 cuts to move the legs only in 2 inches on one end. It will take longer to change the drawings than make the cuts.

What say ye ?

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Old 11-19-2012, 06:43 PM   #32
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Added a reversible, lowerable, removeable hanger to the stand.



It has multiple functions, though it can only do one at once.

1. Its a rack to hold hoses and stirring implements.

2. Its a rack to hold a cloth malt hopper bag above a Monster Mill, also mounted to it. This will allow the monster mill and hopper to occupy only 12x19x3" when in storage. I've been dreading building the hopper for my malt mill because I don't want to have to store something big.

3. If rotated 180 degrees, it becomes a rack to hold a BIAB for the last brew kettle, though one won't be able to close the lid while it steeps, unless one finds a way to feed wires through the lid.

Its not the ideal place to mount a malt hopper because of steam off the last kettle. And one doesn't want dust where one will be filling carboys with chilled wort. But, I have limited storage space for brewing stuff and I think this is the easiest way to build a compact milling setup. And I can remove the bag from the stand as soon as I am done grinding the malt.

The hardest part would be sewing the bag. I think it would work pretty well. One would have to put the malt bucket on a chair or something to get it the right height to catch the ground malt.

Is it worth doing ?

Edit: I could also hang the brew controller display from it.

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Old 11-19-2012, 11:47 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brewman ! View Post
Added a reversible, lowerable, removeable hanger to the stand.



It has multiple functions, though it can only do one at once.

1. Its a rack to hold hoses and stirring implements.

2. Its a rack to hold a cloth malt hopper bag above a Monster Mill, also mounted to it. This will allow the monster mill and hopper to occupy only 12x19x3" when in storage. I've been dreading building the hopper for my malt mill because I don't want to have to store something big.

3. If rotated 180 degrees, it becomes a rack to hold a BIAB for the last brew kettle, though one won't be able to close the lid while it steeps, unless one finds a way to feed wires through the lid.

Its not the ideal place to mount a malt hopper because of steam off the last kettle. And one doesn't want dust where one will be filling carboys with chilled wort. But, I have limited storage space for brewing stuff and I think this is the easiest way to build a compact milling setup. And I can remove the bag from the stand as soon as I am done grinding the malt.

The hardest part would be sewing the bag. I think it would work pretty well. One would have to put the malt bucket on a chair or something to get it the right height to catch the ground malt.

Is it worth doing ?

Edit: I could also hang the brew controller display from it.
Send me your CAD file, in dxf please

How about some round tube to fit into your frame that can be machined to accept various hangars and such. You could cross drill the tube an use some thumb screws to lock into the height you want. I am trying to visualize your hangar apparatus in two view.
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Old 11-20-2012, 12:19 AM   #34
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Seems to me it should be somewhere close to the mash tun, yet it shouldn't interfere with the path from the sink and the shelf to the mash tun and boil kettles and it needs to be away from heat and spray and it can't interfere with access to the mash tun and...
You definitely want it close. I have a pyramidal design. HLT up top, then MLT and BK on the second tier. The CP is right between the mash tun and the bk and just below the HLT. I brew with electric water heater elements so I don't have to worry about excess heat except what comes off of the bk.
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Old 11-20-2012, 12:23 AM   #35
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Latest iteration. Added the pumps, chiller, a water filter, the sink has a profile and a shelf to put the malt pail on. I left the shelf off the drawing, but its still part of the design.

Its not obvious from the drawing, but the entire surface of the bottom shelf is covered in aluminum checkerplate. Lest anyone think I'm rich, I've been collecting materials to do this project for a long time. My local metal recycler sells scrap SS and aluminum for $1/lb. I stop in about once a month.

I'll probably also put a door over the area under the sink to hide the plumbing mess that is going to be under there.

I mounted the water filter upside down so that it completely drains without taking it apart when I blow out the system.





Right now the rack for hanging tools is just the 12" of square tubing that the grain bag is hanging from. Remove the grain bag (and mill, it unbolts) and you have the rack by itself.

There are a couple problems using pipe instead of square tube.

1) I have to buy 20 feet of anything I use, so the outside pipe would be expensive. It would have to be SS.

2) I can bolt the flat side of a square tube directly to the square tube of the stand with simple bolt holes. And unbolt it and stow it away, sliding it inside the long tubes of the stand. As soon as I go with round tube, I have to weld it, which increases the overall length of the stand.

3) I am leery of using set screws to hold a load, for a whole pile of reasons.

Nevertheless, I'd love to see some drawings or sketches of what you had in mind.

I'll look into sharing the CAD files later. Right now they are a mess.

Thanks for the reply.

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Old 11-20-2012, 10:28 PM   #36
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I got a bit of time to work on the stand last night.

I'm trying to work on things that need to be done regardless of the design of my stand while I let the design ideas I've come up with ferment for a few days.

One such item is the caster mounts. No matter what stand I build, I'll need plates for under my caster wheels.

The bases on my caster wheels measure 3" x 4". Unfortunately, I don't have any 3" or 4" wide SS flat bar and my local SS supplier has a 20 foot minimum on that material at about $5 per foot, depending on thickness.

What I do have on hand is 2" wide SS flat bar that I bought at a metal recycler, cheap. So I cut myself 12 3" pieces and TIG welded them together with a filleted butt weld. It was a bit more work, but a lot cheaper and I got some welding practice along the way.

I'll let the pictures tell the rest of the story.











FWIW, I was using the TIG function on an Everlast Power Pro 256 on DCEN at about 125 amps, pulser off, with a (dirty) 3/32 electrode and 1/16" 308 (?) filler wire. I had no trouble with warpage. The heat affected zone was very small and the penetration was very good. I was actually wishing for a larger arc and puddle.

As you can see, this material is used and highly tarnished. I'll shine these up once all the welding is done.

This was my first ever production type TIG welding, although in a past life I used to braze with oxy acetylene.

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Old 12-03-2012, 12:31 AM   #37
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For those who asked, this is the cut off wheel I am using on my compound mitre saw. $12. The RPM is the important part, This one is rated at 5092 RPM. I think its meant to be used on a gas powered saw.

The other thing is the blade thickness. This one is 1/8". That removes more material and makes cutting slower, but all my cuts are straight. Some people have been complaining about non straight cuts. I wonder if they are flexing their blades.





The drill bits are cobalt. I hope they work well for drilling SS. I haven't tried them yet.

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Old 12-03-2012, 12:53 AM   #38
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So I got a bit of time to work on this thing.

Of the best laid plans of mice and men... In the time I wasn't working on it, I stumbled on a large decently sized sink at our local Costco for $220.



The main sink is 17x17. The side sink is 12x17. 9? inches deep. It comes with racks for the bottom of the tubs and drains.

I've been trying to get one of the medium sized restaurant sinks used, forever, to no avail. If you think $220 is a lot of money for a sink, I dare you to go sink shopping these days.

What I like about this sink is having 2 tubs (one can be for soaking or rinsing) and the tubs are flat right to the edge, so that things don't fall over if placed near the edge. And the tubs, both of them, are big enough to hold big things, like a keg upside down, draining.

Problems.

1) Cost. Luckily, I've been a good boy this year so Santa is getting it for me.

2) The stand becomes longer by about 11 inches, from 82 inches to 93 inches. So it takes up more room. I'm storing it outside, so it isn't that big of an issue, but it is getting large.

On the other hand, because the stand has hot water and burners and a sink and a shelf, its going to be able to do double duty as a food prep center if we host an event outside somewhere or on our deck.

3) I need to lengthen my stand by about 11 inches, from 82 inches to 93 inches. I already cut my long pieces at 82 inches. I now have to weld 11 inches onto each of them. If I grind and polish the welds, you wouldn't be able to tell.

4) The sink has a mounting track under the lip that stands about 1/2" high. Its spot welded about every 3/8" to the lip. This prevents the sink from sitting flat on the SS tubing, which I would like it to do. I have no idea how I would remove it without wrecking the sink.



Ideas ?

I also purchased a different fawcet.



It was $135. I'll return the other one which was $80. I need to put a longer hose on this one so that it will reach right to the bottom of the sink and over into my mash tun to fill it.

I decided to upgrade these components after seeing pictures of Mr. Blichman's setup in the home brewery design article in the November 2012 issue of Brew Your Own. He, of course, uses the real, large, restaurant sink with the real restaurant fawcet. I can't afford those, but I can afford this.

My brewstand is getting expensive. But on the other hand, my wife doesn't want me brewing in the house and even if she did, I don't have a room in it to do so. This is the easiest, cheapest way to build something similar to a custom brewing room in a house without actually doing so. And if I ever do get to have a brewery room in a house, all this stuff will fit right in.

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Old 12-03-2012, 01:00 AM   #39
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Looking good. You know what they say, measure twice cut once

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Old 12-03-2012, 06:37 AM   #40
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Looking good. You know what they say, measure twice cut once
The saying should go more like "get your d@mn spec figured out before you start building anything". There were no measurement errors. There were planning errors !

I knew that I wanted a larger sink when I was doing the drawing and playing around with things. Actually, I was happy to have a sink, any sink on the stand when I was working on the drawings, but I also knew the "right" thing to do was to get a larger and better sink than what I had.

I was trying to save money by using the sink I had and I couldn't find anything better for a reasonable price and blah, blah, blah... but then I saw the new sink in Costco and asked myself why am I trying to save $200 on this project and put up with a less than optimal sink for the next 10 years ? The stand is built around the sink and its not something you can change out later on if you build it sized for the smaller sink.

Good tools generally pay for themselves if you use them.

Anyway... justify it anyway you want, or not, I splurged and got the sink.

Side thought.

I could make the sink fold down on the side of the stand when not in use and thus have a stand that is 20 inches shorter when in storage.

However, the design would get a bit messy because the hot water heater would still be mounted above the sink and it can't really be folded out of the way and the tap on the sink would stick out the side when its folded down and then mounting the folding side table gets tricky because then its mounting to a folding sink.

I think I'll just put up with the stand being 93 inches long and be done with it. At least its all stainless and plastic and its not going to rust when I store it outside.
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