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Old 05-17-2012, 12:49 AM   #1
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Default 2000 watts v. 1700 watts for RIMS

Rheem makes both a stainless 120V 2000W and a 1700W low density element. Any ideas on which one would be better for step mashing and preventing scorching with a RIMS tube having a 1.875" i.d. (or is there really no difference)

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Old 05-17-2012, 12:50 AM   #2
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can I ask where you are getting the 1700w?

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Old 05-17-2012, 12:51 AM   #3
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http://bostonheatingsupply.com/sp10868kl.aspx
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Old 05-17-2012, 02:22 PM   #4
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its a difference of 15%, so heating the same volume of water will take 15% longer for the 1700w.

if both elements are the same physical size, then the 1700w one will be a lower watt density.

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Old 05-17-2012, 03:32 PM   #5
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I went to homedepot and got the 2000watt one for 10 bucks, works great. I do get some caking on the element, but i don't even bother with it. The 2000 watt element already takes some time to get the wort boiling again, i can't imagine how long it would take with 15% less watts.

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Old 05-17-2012, 04:01 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dhruv6911 View Post
I went to homedepot and got the 2000watt one for 10 bucks, works great. I do get some caking on the element, but i don't even bother with it. The 2000 watt element already takes some time to get the wort boiling again, i can't imagine how long it would take with 15% less watts.
The OP was looking at RIMS for maintaining mash temp. Are you using this element in a brew kettle? What size boils?
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Old 05-17-2012, 06:52 PM   #7
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Right. Is the 1700W powerful enough to step mash?

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Old 05-18-2012, 02:09 AM   #8
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So according to the electric heat spread sheet I have it takes 5 minutes for 1700 watts to heat 5 gallons of water 10*F and 4 minutes for 2000 watts. Also it looks like the 1700 watt is 13 1/2 inchs long where as the 2000 watt is 9 1/2 so the 1700 watt is a much lower density element.

I just ordered 2 2000 watts for my brew kettle because I had some scorching issues with the HD 2000 watt high density ones. However I am still using the high density one in my rims tube. I don't step mash, and have had zero issue with scorching with a 10* change when doughing in.

If i where building a new tube and wanted to step I would most likely go with the 1700 watt one. Just make sure to insulate the RIMS tube itself and and tubing used to connect the mash tun and RIMS tube.

**PS** I also wonder about protein denaturing on the element itself, the high density ones get hot. I doubt it's an issue, just some food for thought.

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Old 05-18-2012, 03:39 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodDogShelby View Post
The OP was looking at RIMS for maintaining mash temp. Are you using this element in a brew kettle? What size boils?
6-7 gallon boils for a 5-5.5 gallon batch.
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Old 05-18-2012, 01:06 PM   #10
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Thanks for the info!!!! I think I will go with the 1700 to be safe and see if stepping is an issue.

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