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Old 12-10-2008, 07:54 PM   #1
mangine77
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Default Has anyone put together a GIMP tutorial for labels?

I realize that a lot of people use GIMP for labels and I've looked through the GIMP tutorials and there is SO much info, that it's overwhelming.

I'm wondering if anyone has created a GIMP beer label type tutorial ( ya know, discussing dimensions for labels, just the basic photo editing and text that you would want to create decent labels).

Anything like that out there? If not, of the many GIMP tutorials, which one did you find to be the most pertinent for label making??

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Old 12-10-2008, 07:58 PM   #2
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i would start with the tutorials provided on gimps website

GIMP - Tutorials

they seem to be pretty good. i think it might be tough to find a tutorial specifically for making labels. as far as dimensions go, I cut out some sample label sizes and put them on my bottles to determine what size i wanted to go with.

the rest of the skills needed you can piece together from those tutorials.

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Old 12-10-2008, 08:03 PM   #3
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Gimp can be very useful on it's own, but is most useful in conjunction with a vector-based graphics editor. Inkscape is a great free one, Adobe Illustrator is a commercial example. These let you have the elements of your graphic (text, different pictures, background, etc) as seperate objects and adjust their positions and relationships much the same way as you do on a powerpoint slide. Typically I end up creating specific elements of my graphics on the raster side (in GIMP) and then combining them in inkscape.

I don't have time right now to answer your Gimp questions but the truth is that the only way to learn that stuff is to hunt around the web and play with the software, and in the end it's creative use of the tools that makes great graphics (not the tools themselves). Maybe later or tomorrow I can try to post some basic info.

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Old 12-10-2008, 08:07 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goplayoutside View Post
Gimp can be very useful on it's own, but is most useful in conjunction with a vector-based graphics editor. Inkscape is a great free one, Adobe Illustrator is a commercial example. These let you have the elements of your graphic (text, different pictures, background, etc) as seperate objects and adjust their positions and relationships much the same way as you do on a powerpoint slide. Typically I end up creating specific elements of my graphics on the raster side (in GIMP) and then combining them in inkscape.

I don't have time right now to answer your Gimp questions but the truth is that the only way to learn that stuff is to hunt around the web and play with the software, and in the end it's creative use of the tools that makes great graphics (not the tools themselves). Maybe later or tomorrow I can try to post some basic info.

That would be sweet. Thanks.
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Old 12-16-2008, 09:57 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goplayoutside View Post
Gimp can be very useful on it's own, but is most useful in conjunction with a vector-based graphics editor. Inkscape is a great free one, Adobe Illustrator is a commercial example. These let you have the elements of your graphic (text, different pictures, background, etc) as seperate objects and adjust their positions and relationships much the same way as you do on a powerpoint slide. Typically I end up creating specific elements of my graphics on the raster side (in GIMP) and then combining them in inkscape.
Just to clarify, the reason for using vector graphics is because you can scale them to infinite sizes. Raster graphics on the other hand are stuck at the size you originally create them. Thus moving a raster image into a vector editor does not add any value. Raster editors such as GIMP and Photoshop are perfectly capable of editing multiple layers (which you seem to believe can only be done in a vector editor).
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Old 12-16-2008, 02:05 PM   #6
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i just make the photo with gimp......then i open microsoft word and insert the photo. Resize to fit 3-4 on the page and print. when i print with gimp the images always come out way to large.

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Old 12-17-2008, 01:15 AM   #7
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I've been using Photoshop Elements on my Windows machine coupled with MS Word to print to Avery shipping labels. PS Elements doesn't have the right label template to print to, so I just copy/paste the final image to Word. So far, things have worked out well, although I haven't done very much label making since I went to kegs.

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Old 12-17-2008, 08:13 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by holden View Post
Just to clarify, the reason for using vector graphics is because you can scale them to infinite sizes. Raster graphics on the other hand are stuck at the size you originally create them. Thus moving a raster image into a vector editor does not add any value. Raster editors such as GIMP and Photoshop are perfectly capable of editing multiple layers (which you seem to believe can only be done in a vector editor).
True. That said, I prefer the object-based approach that inkscape uses and to the layer-based one that gimp uses because I find it to be more intuitive.
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Old 12-17-2008, 08:16 PM   #9
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To the OP:

What specifically are you trying to do in Gimp? It might be easiest to get to know the software by focussing on specific tasks.

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Old 12-17-2008, 08:42 PM   #10
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+1 for Inkscape I have used it for all of my labels in conjunction with Gimp. While you can make labels in Gimp it's pretty hard and you are limited, Inkscape will allow you to wrap text, make shapes, and scale things very well while Gimp..not so much.

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