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Old 03-25-2010, 08:31 PM   #131
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Excellent job! I knew someone would be able to master it as well. I discovered that after a looong time, the lacquer I used would crack a lot when opening a bottle. It's probably worth experimenting with different kinds.

Sort of off-topic...has anyone ever procured copper-colored caps?...Like the occasional Dogfish Head caps. The picture above almost looked copperish and it made me wonder if they were available to the home brewer.
Thanks, it took a little to get it down so the ink wouldn't rub off, but i think i got a system down now. Those above are SS oxy barrier caps, the lighting probably had a weird effect on the picture. But yeah, they came out awesome, i started doing about 10 at a time, and it takes about 10 minutes total per batch. So i usually just sit down and watch a hockey game and i can do a bunch then. Awesome write-up, it was very easy to follow, i just had to adjust different things to make them come out good (how much medium to apply, how long to wait, how hard to rub, etc.) and i eventually came out with the right process for me.


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Old 03-29-2010, 01:43 PM   #132
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Hi xjncoguyx, what type of paper are you using ? Would it be posible to have the brand of the one you use ?

Thank you,
Northern



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Old 03-29-2010, 02:06 PM   #133
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Hi xjncoguyx, what type of paper are you using ? Would it be posible to have the brand of the one you use ?

Thank you,
Northern
This is the exact stuff i used.
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Old 03-29-2010, 02:10 PM   #134
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Hem ... It's the same paper I tried. I can't achieve a good result, everytime I scrap the paper, the ink come off with it. I'll try on a different brand of caps to see if it makes a difference...

Thank you for your answer,
Alex

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Old 03-29-2010, 02:13 PM   #135
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Hem ... It's the same paper I tried. I can't achieve a good result, everytime I scrap the paper, the ink come off with it. I'll try on a different brand of caps to see if it makes a difference...

Thank you for your answer,
Alex
Could be a couple reasons, possibly you didn't print on the best setting to get enough ink, maybe you didn't use enough acrylic, possibly didn't rub hard enough. Or maybe you're rubbing to hard on the paper after you run it under water. If you rub too hard the paper particles will rub the acrylic off.
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Old 03-29-2010, 02:36 PM   #136
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Could be a couple reasons, possibly you didn't print on the best setting to get enough ink, maybe you didn't use enough acrylic, possibly didn't rub hard enough. Or maybe you're rubbing to hard on the paper after you run it under water. If you rub too hard the paper particles will rub the acrylic off.
I agree with everything xjncoguyx just mentioned. I'm not sure if it wasn't described well enough in the original instructions (or the follow-ups), but you definitely do not "scratch" the paper away. It needs to be rubbed away with the pad of your thumb (or finger, whatever). When you think all of the paper is gone, check in the light to see if there is still any paper pulp still left clinging... if so, keep rubbing under the water until there is only a dull layer left.

Scratching is only helpful to remove excess matte medium buildup around the edges. If your image comes close to the edge, you obviously have to be very careful.

I have noticed that on colored caps, there is somewhat of a gloss...that may make it a bit more difficult for the image to stay put, but I haven't had too much of a problem.

Unfortunately, it's not an entirely mechanical process...it take a bit of a "touch" to find your right groove, but once you do, it's like riding a bike and you'll become much more efficient at it.
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Old 03-29-2010, 03:46 PM   #137
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I agree with everything xjncoguyx just mentioned. I'm not sure if it wasn't described well enough in the original instructions (or the follow-ups), but you definitely do not "scratch" the paper away. It needs to be rubbed away with the pad of your thumb (or finger, whatever). When you think all of the paper is gone, check in the light to see if there is still any paper pulp still left clinging... if so, keep rubbing under the water until there is only a dull layer left.

Scratching is only helpful to remove excess matte medium buildup around the edges. If your image comes close to the edge, you obviously have to be very careful.

I have noticed that on colored caps, there is somewhat of a gloss...that may make it a bit more difficult for the image to stay put, but I haven't had too much of a problem.

Unfortunately, it's not an entirely mechanical process...it take a bit of a "touch" to find your right groove, but once you do, it's like riding a bike and you'll become much more efficient at it.
At first i couldn't tell if any paper was left because the matte finish leaves sort of a haze. But when you go to lacquer it usually clears the haze up pretty well. I've done about 40 of em so far for my upcoming batch, nice little project to do while watching a hockey game. Although it is time consuming, i was contemplating getting a customized rubber stamp and possibly trying that method with some permanent ink. If i end up going that route i'll be sure to make a thread about it.
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Old 03-29-2010, 04:34 PM   #138
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At first i couldn't tell if any paper was left because the matte finish leaves sort of a haze. But when you go to lacquer it usually clears the haze up pretty well. I've done about 40 of em so far for my upcoming batch, nice little project to do while watching a hockey game. Although it is time consuming, i was contemplating getting a customized rubber stamp and possibly trying that method with some permanent ink. If i end up going that route i'll be sure to make a thread about it.
Ha, I think I may be a couple steps ahead of you there...while you may have better luck, I have tried both the custom stamp and the silk-screening methods before this one.

While the online source for the custom stamps was a breeze and reasonably priced, I had a few issues:
- Most caps are not perfectly flat on top which means you either have to rock the stamp around or press harder. Both leave the ink smudged from the movement or the rubber deforming (especially with finer details)
- Permanent stamping ink (at least the kind I tried) needs to be heat set when used on metal... I can't imagine it would be good for the seal underneath.
- Even when ignoring the potential heating issue, the ink never really set very well. Rubbing or light scraping would easily remove or smudge the ink (especially on colored caps).
- Properly centering the stamps was a nightmare...it was most evident on one of my designs that has a large circle incorporated into the design.

Those were just a few of the issues with stamping for me...but YMMV.

Screen printing was another headache. I admit, I didn't have the best of equipment required to do the printing, but what I did do indicated I'd be pretty disappointed again. I made a template that could hold the caps, I made a frame for the screen, bought screen printing ink for metal, made the screen, etc. When it was all said and done, the cap holding template was misaligned with the screen...ughh. Then when I tried printing anyway, I had issues with the ink seeping into areas it wasn't supposed to be and the thread pattern ended up in the ink left on the cap. Also, the ink required heat setting...which I discussed above.
All of these problems could probably be remedied with more precision, more practice, better materials, etc, etc...but I was just getting impatient and it was costing more and more money.

Assuming both of those methods worked flawlessly, you are also limited to one color...multi-colored printing with either method would require mechanical precision...but hey, maybe the handmade look is what some people may go for, in that case, more power to ya.

Personally, I think silk screening would be a great option if all of the issues I described were dialed in better and there was a fool-proof ink available. Stamping just ended up being way too rough around the edges to become a feasible option to me.

I'm still looking into alternative options...ones that require less finesse and could be applied quicker. I'll let you all know what I come up with...if I ever do..haha
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Old 03-29-2010, 05:00 PM   #139
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Originally Posted by Hokie View Post
Ha, I think I may be a couple steps ahead of you there...while you may have better luck, I have tried both the custom stamp and the silk-screening methods before this one.

While the online source for the custom stamps was a breeze and reasonably priced, I had a few issues:
- Most caps are not perfectly flat on top which means you either have to rock the stamp around or press harder. Both leave the ink smudged from the movement or the rubber deforming (especially with finer details)
- Permanent stamping ink (at least the kind I tried) needs to be heat set when used on metal... I can't imagine it would be good for the seal underneath.
- Even when ignoring the potential heating issue, the ink never really set very well. Rubbing or light scraping would easily remove or smudge the ink (especially on colored caps).
- Properly centering the stamps was a nightmare...it was most evident on one of my designs that has a large circle incorporated into the design.

Those were just a few of the issues with stamping for me...but YMMV.

Screen printing was another headache. I admit, I didn't have the best of equipment required to do the printing, but what I did do indicated I'd be pretty disappointed again. I made a template that could hold the caps, I made a frame for the screen, bought screen printing ink for metal, made the screen, etc. When it was all said and done, the cap holding template was misaligned with the screen...ughh. Then when I tried printing anyway, I had issues with the ink seeping into areas it wasn't supposed to be and the thread pattern ended up in the ink left on the cap. Also, the ink required heat setting...which I discussed above.
All of these problems could probably be remedied with more precision, more practice, better materials, etc, etc...but I was just getting impatient and it was costing more and more money.

Assuming both of those methods worked flawlessly, you are also limited to one color...multi-colored printing with either method would require mechanical precision...but hey, maybe the handmade look is what some people may go for, in that case, more power to ya.

Personally, I think silk screening would be a great option if all of the issues I described were dialed in better and there was a fool-proof ink available. Stamping just ended up being way too rough around the edges to become a feasible option to me.

I'm still looking into alternative options...ones that require less finesse and could be applied quicker. I'll let you all know what I come up with...if I ever do..haha
Gotcha, alright thanks
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Old 12-10-2011, 10:50 PM   #140
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so before i read the whole thread i wanted to see if anyone could answer my question quickly.

do you need to quickly cut and transfer the image after printing or can it be done over a couple of hours/days? IE you print out a sheet of like 24 images and you do 12 today and 12 tomorrow will there be a difference?



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