Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Yeast.. mmmm
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-06-2009, 02:38 PM   #1
Bdub81
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 19
Default Yeast.. mmmm

Ok.

So here is the question. This may be a little premature for me to ask, but I figured I might as well get this out there now.

I am really no stranger to yeast. I have made breads and pizza doughs that consist of yeast, and have had really no minor problems activating.

My first batch I am making is an Amber Ale. I followed the directions on the recipe kit as closely to a "T" as possible. I also consulted a co-worker who has been brewing beers for years.

So the kit said that once the wort was in the fermenter at 70F, just sprinkle the contents of the yeast package and stir it well, then seal it up and airlock it.

However, the package of yeast also had activating instructions - pour contents into 4oz of warm water 80-93F and let suspend for 15 minutes. So I did this, and kept it as close to 90F as possible - there was much movement, but it didnt have the same reaction that I see with bread yeast (starts to rise and get really foamy within the cup). Either way, I let it sit for 15 minutes or so, then I pour in about a quarter cup of wart to start evening up the temperature, waited about 3 to 4 minutes, threw in a little more, and checked the temperature - it was within a few degrees so I then just pitched it, and sealed.

Again, I may be premature with my worries, but is this something partially normal? Should I be concerned? The fermentation is currently happening in one of my bathrooms. I blacked out the windows with a black sheet - and when I keep the door closed it stays at about 70-72 degrees in there.

Suggestions? Or should I just check it tommorrow morning for bubbling in the airlock?

__________________
Bdub81 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-06-2009, 02:48 PM   #2
czeknere
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lansdale, PA
Posts: 140
Default

I'm confused. What question are you asking?

If you're asking about whether or not its normal to have to re-hydrate your yeast, I think its personal preference. I have done both when it comes to dry yeast. There were some that I just sprinkled on the top of the wort, and there were others that I re-hydrated. Each time I have re-hydrated, it sounds like what you described happened to you, so I'm going to say that its normal. If I had to venture a complete guess I would say that it's because yeast used in brewing takes longer to start really working. Think about when you make bread, you see the bread start rising fairly quick. In brewing, fermentation can take a lot longer to start. So I would assume that you didn't see much action when you re-hydrate it because it was only 15 minutes.

If you're asking whether or not you should be seeing more bubbles in the airlock, first read this: Link. And second, remember that bubbles in the airlock are just a release of extra CO2 and not necessarily a sign of fermentation. Fermentation can be happened inside the bucket without moving the airlock.

My vote is to give it a week or two then get a hydrometer reading. Until then: RDWHAHB

__________________

Last edited by czeknere; 01-06-2009 at 02:51 PM.
czeknere is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-06-2009, 03:47 PM   #3
Rezilynt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Bellingham, Washington
Posts: 784
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts

Default

It's normal - let it sit. I do have three suggestions though. - Just my opinion.
Try to get the temp a little lower.
You do not have to black out your windows (some neighbors get suspicious) throw a dark t-shirt over over the fermenter.
You stated that you are use to bread yeasts, etc... be careful when brewing in the same area that you have recently used bread yeast. There have been members that have baked fresh bread and then brewed beer shortly after. The bread yeast actually added to the taste of the beer - and not in a good way.

__________________

If farmers make wine and engineers make beer, what the hell am I doing here?

Rezilynt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-06-2009, 11:06 PM   #4
Flattop
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 122
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I often rehydrate, usually some of the yeast sinks and some floats. After 30 mins or so a bit of bubbling can go on and a small foamy head. Any of that activity is normal, i have had one yeast just dump to the bottom and nothing happened, that was the only yeast that didn't work, i had to pitch a backup yeast on that brew. If you want to make it start fermentation add a small amount of dex (half a teaspoon maybe).

Bread yeast is a different strain and you shouldn't compare the two, in fact even different beer strains react differently, some top ferment some bottom ferement some start fast, some slow.
Either way i prefer to see a little activity in the re-hydrated yeast before i pitch.

__________________
Flattop is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-06-2009, 11:19 PM   #5
kryolla
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Reading PA
Posts: 433
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

KISS just pitch yeast at recommended temps, stir and RDWHACB and you should see bubbles within 12-24 hrs for 11g pack of dry yeast

__________________
kryolla is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2009, 01:37 AM   #6
Bdub81
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 19
Default

Thanks everyone, I think I jumped the gun on worrying.

The Airlock is doing its thing. I am pretty pleased that the temperature it is at is working pretty well. The room has been stable in temp between 68 to 72 degrees..

And as far as the blacking out the bathroom window - it doesnt matter anyway, the neighbors dont have a view of that window, plus its glass block windows - cant really see anything thew them anyways.

And as far as the bread yeast goes - everything that I used that may have touched it bread yeast recently was sterilized in a bleach bath and a idophor bath - just to make sure.

I'll keep you up dated on the results. Bottling should be in less then a week according to the package.

__________________
To brew or not to brew...

There is no question.
Bdub81 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My first batch - Mmmm ThreeTaps General Beer Discussion 2 08-31-2009 11:24 PM
Mmmm mr. yeast, please eat this tandpbrewing Brew Science 16 07-29-2009 05:02 PM
mmmm gooood winzerz Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 19 12-11-2008 01:59 PM