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Old 01-03-2014, 03:56 AM   #11
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65-75 is ideal for the strain. Got the house at 70, fermenter is 74-75...
If you're actively fermenting with S-04 (which is Whitbread strain) at a 74-75*F beer temp, you are quite likely to get some pronounced esters and maybe some banana flavor. It will not be a "clean" ferment.

That strain does best starting out and holding it around 63-64*F until it slows down and then allowing it to come up into the 68-70*F range to finish.
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Old 01-03-2014, 06:52 AM   #12
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What about WLP001? I'm brewing a hoppy red ale with OG of 1080. pitched at 70. Room temp is about 68 and beer temp about 73. According to instructions from LHBS, this is just about right. Now after a bunch of reading here, I'm questioning that it might be too high. Yeast was pitched about 58 hours ago. Is it too late to put the carboy in a water bath to try and cool it down?

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Old 01-03-2014, 01:27 PM   #13
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What about WLP001? I'm brewing a hoppy red ale with OG of 1080. pitched at 70. Room temp is about 68 and beer temp about 73. According to instructions from LHBS, this is just about right. Now after a bunch of reading here, I'm questioning that it might be too high. Yeast was pitched about 58 hours ago. Is it too late to put the carboy in a water bath to try and cool it down?
Most folks who have the ability to control temps like to pitch around 60-62*F, start Chico (WLP001/US-05) at 64-65*F, and then later go on up to 68*F or so after activity slows. If using that yeast, you're probably looking for a cleaner/neutral ferment in a pale, IPA or amber. Pitching/fermenting with it at those temps will give you that.

You want to cool it down some, but not too quickly or too much at this stage of the process. Since you're 2-3 days into it, most of your unwanted flavors have already been produced. The tap water is pretty cool this time of year, so I'd start out with just that in the tub with no ice bottles and see where that takes it in the first several hours.

Kit instructions are often not very good and sometimes downright awful. In this case, giving you the idea that 73*F is a desirable ferment temp for WLP001 (or most other non-saison ale yeast for that matter) isn't sound advice.
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Old 01-03-2014, 05:45 PM   #14
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Well that really sucks! (the possibility of off flavors) But I appreciate the info. I'm sure it will still be beer, but I was hoping for awesome beer! Probably a good reason why I should have chosen a smaller (cheaper) recipe for my first brew. I'll learn from this and my next few batches will be simpler until I get my process down. Funny thing is, I actually put the carboy in a water bath right after pitching, but the water temp was about 64 and I was afraid the wort temp would be too low, and fermentation wouldn't kick off, so I took it out.

So now I'm really worried because I was planning on doing a Centennial Blonde this weekend. Already bought the supplies including Nottingham yeast, which I think needs even lower temps than Cali Ale. Is there another yeast I could sub that is more tolerant of my current setup? I want this to be a very clean, dry beer for my friends who aren't into the hoppy ales like I am. I will definitely try to get down to the low 60s before I pitch, and use a water bath and frozen bottles from the start.

Appologies to the OP if I have thread jacked. Hopefully this conversation is contributing to your original questions.

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Old 01-04-2014, 03:15 AM   #15
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So now I'm really worried because I was planning on doing a Centennial Blonde this weekend. Already bought the supplies including Nottingham yeast, which I think needs even lower temps than Cali Ale. Is there another yeast I could sub that is more tolerant of my current setup? I want this to be a very clean, dry beer for my friends who aren't into the hoppy ales like I am. I will definitely try to get down to the low 60s before I pitch, and use a water bath and frozen bottles from the start.
Nottingham requires lower temps than most ale yeast. Fermented in the 55-57*F range to start gives a very clean result. If you let it get above 68*F beer temp while fermentation is active, however, it can throw off some funky off-flavors. At this point, you may want to stick with US-05.

Since you live in the great state of TX, it would be a really good idea to (if you have the room) look into getting a used fridge or freezer (check Craigslist) and setting it up with an STC-1000 or other controller. All of your fermentation temperature worries will become a distant memory.
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Old 01-04-2014, 04:12 AM   #16
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Yes, US-05 was one of the options listed in the Centennial Blonde thread. I'll pick some up and save the Notty until I have better temp control.

And yes, I have thought that once I'm completely hooked on this new lifestyle - was going to say hobby, but it's so much more - that I would set up a temp controlled fermentation chamber. That way I could get the buckets/carboy out of the house, AND I would have to clean the garage to make the space. Both will make my wife VERY happy.

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Old 01-04-2014, 04:43 AM   #17
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I think Bry97 is said to be fairly more warm tolerant than other ale yeast, as is coopers ale yeast I believe. I personally have not used those temps with bry97 but I have fermented low mid 70's for Coopers ale yeast, it was ok but not shure if it was the beer or the yeast really, but I think it was a combo and confirmed I did not like that yeast that much. Other than belgian beers, you need to control temps otherwise youll have off or estery beers, its a reason I dont brew in summer also. Only because I dont have good control of ambiant temps but I can if making a swamp cooler or brew in winter. Otherwise I just roll with mother nature accordingly when I brew.

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