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Old 11-04-2009, 11:13 PM   #1
nasmeyer
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Default Why not chill wort to 64-65*?

If I want to ferment an ale at say 64-65*, why not chill the wort down to 64-65* right after the boil and warm my yeast up to 64-65* then pitch? Is there an advantage or disadvantage to doing this? It seems to me that it would be easier on the yeast by not changing the temps on them. I haven't seen a recipe that instructs this so I am sure there is a good reason not to do this, but am not sure.

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Old 11-04-2009, 11:17 PM   #2
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Thats what I do. I guess some people might have trouble chilling past 70F, especially in the summer. I chill down to around 80 with tap water, then switch to recirculating ice water via a submersible pump. It makes sense to chill to your ferm temp.

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Old 11-04-2009, 11:18 PM   #3
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That's what I do. Ideally, I'd cool to 60 degrees, or so, and have the yeast starter at the same temperature, and then allow it to warm up to my fermentation temperature of 64 degrees. Usually, it's about all I can do to chill my ales to 64, with the wort chiller, though.

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Old 11-04-2009, 11:20 PM   #4
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Are you doing partial boils, or full boils? I am by far no expert, but when I do
a partial boil of about 2 1/2-3 gallons, I cool it to 70* with my chiller. When I add the rest of the top off water ( I use bottled water) the temp drops into the 60's. Then I pitch. Each paket of yeast gives the optimum teperature.
Don't know if that answered your question.

Edit: more experienced people beat me to the punch. Listen to them, cause I sure do!

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Old 11-04-2009, 11:48 PM   #5
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I do partial boils. I have no problem here in Michigan getting my chiller to cool my wort into the sixties, so I will have to try this next time.

I guess I was wondering if the yeast needed to start at a higher temp (75-80 as most recipes call for) to start out during fermentation, and that maybe starting in the mid-sixties might somehow slow the process or affect the final attenuation, or if lowering the temp during the first day or so of fermentation to the desired target of 64-65* would stress the yeast.

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Old 11-05-2009, 12:10 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nasmeyer View Post
I do partial boils. I have no problem here in Michigan getting my chiller to cool my wort into the sixties, so I will have to try this next time.

I guess I was wondering if the yeast needed to start at a higher temp (75-80 as most recipes call for) to start out during fermentation, and that maybe starting in the mid-sixties might somehow slow the process or affect the final attenuation, or if lowering the temp during the first day or so of fermentation to the desired target of 64-65* would stress the yeast.
Oh, no on the contrary! The reason the instructions have you start warmer and then lower the temperature is to ensure a quicker start. If you pitch the correct amount of yeast (make a starter for liquid yeast, following mrmalty.com's yeast pitching calculator), then you'll have better beer if you actually pitch at fermentation temperatures or even a bit below.

You can then let the temperatures rise a bit at the end of fermentation, if you're unsure about getting complete attenuation. But pitching the proper amount of yeast at the proper pitching temperature is probably one of the single best things you can do to improve your beer!
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Old 11-05-2009, 12:23 AM   #7
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Quote:
You can then let the temperatures rise a bit at the end of fermentation, if you're unsure about getting complete attenuation. But pitching the proper amount of yeast at the proper pitching temperature is probably one of the single best things you can do to improve your beer!
This is exactly what I do also. A good pitch of yeast is important. I do all of my ales well below the advertised low temp. If you have a good pitch this lower temp is over come easily. Then raise slowly up to high sixties towards the end. This is very doable with ever your using for temp control assuming your using temp control. This time of year I don't really need it, but I still feremnt in my son of a fermentation chiller.
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Old 11-05-2009, 05:32 PM   #8
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I try to get my wort below 70, but I'm impatient. I usually pitch at 75F and crank my freezer down to get it where I want it. To answer your question though, try to cool the wort to pitching temp.

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Old 11-05-2009, 08:15 PM   #9
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I always drop to the lower end of the fermentation range to pitch the yeast I use, once they get going they produce heat anyway (read: exothermic). I used to follow kit instructions that said pitch at 80, but I'm not sure why they'd recommend that. once i dialed in temperature control, my beer improved exponentially

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