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Old 02-14-2009, 01:53 AM   #1
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Default Why does by brew look like this?

I uncovered my 5 week old brew (2 primary, 3 secondary) to bottle it and it looks funny.

Check this out, it is real dark at the top. I went ahead and bottled it. When I was bottling it, the color evened out. It tastes and smells fine.

Another thing is odd too. The beer is slightly carbonated with a few bubbles rising up from the bottom. Before, adding the sugar?????

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Old 02-14-2009, 01:57 AM   #2
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Its probably just strange light refraction making the color look off. I'm a color scientist and light and colors still surprise me. Then again, it could be oxidation. I don't know much about oxidation and its effects on color, so dont freak out yet.

all fermented beer will develop some residual carbonation depending on the temperature of the beer. If you think about it, the yeast is putting off C02. Its natural that some of that would dissolve in the beer.

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Old 02-14-2009, 01:59 AM   #3
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Did you use the hydrometer?
The bubbles could be co2 coming out of suspension.
I wouldn't worry if you have a stable gravity
I'll wait with you for the experts.
Regards

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Old 02-14-2009, 01:59 AM   #4
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The carbonation thing is normal. I get that all the time. Just a little CO2 escaping, no worries. The color is interesting. Maybe there's yeast and whatnot settling and it's making the brews color change toward the bottom. I really don't know. It looks like a really big black and tan.

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Old 02-14-2009, 02:01 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Edcculus View Post
Its probably just strange light refraction making the color look off. I'm a color scientist and light and colors still surprise me. Then again, it could be oxidation. I don't know much about oxidation and its effects on color, so dont freak out yet.

all fermented beer will develop some residual carbonation depending on the temperature of the beer. If you think about it, the yeast is putting off C02. Its natural that some of that would dissolve in the beer.
It was not the light. I moved it around and looked at it from many different angles and under different light. I thought the same thing at first too. What was odd, was the more I moved it around the further the darkness dropped. When I first looked at it the darkness was darker, but only about 1 inch deep.
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Old 02-14-2009, 02:06 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by HOOTER View Post
The carbonation thing is normal. I get that all the time. Just a little CO2 escaping, no worries. The color is interesting. Maybe there's yeast and whatnot settling and it's making the brews color change toward the bottom. I really don't know. It looks like a really big black and tan.
It is not the yeast. There was litterally a vary small amount of yeast that settled out of this after 3 weeks in the secondary. I think most of it settled out during primary.

I am not to worried about it. It tasted and smelled fine. I just thought that the color and carbonation was odd. It literally had a noticeable carbonation when drinking it. You say that is normal?
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Old 02-14-2009, 02:07 AM   #7
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I'm going to guess it was oxidation as well. It appears that the top of the beer, the part subject to oxygen exposure, has darkened. Usually when racking a beer from pirmary to secondary, dissolved CO2 escapes and forms a buffer on top of the beer, protecting it from oxygen. It appears that that didn't occur here.

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Old 02-14-2009, 02:12 AM   #8
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I'm going to guess it was oxidation as well. It appears that the top of the beer, the part subject to oxygen exposure, has darkened. Usually when racking a beer from pirmary to secondary, dissolved CO2 escapes and forms a buffer on top of the beer, protecting it from oxygen. It appears that that didn't occur here.
Is it ruined?
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Old 02-14-2009, 02:20 AM   #9
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nah, very rarely is a brew ever "ruined" . Time fixes most anything, although time typically works against an oxidized beer. How does it taste now? If it is good, then go ahead and drink it. Oxidation tends to give beer a cardboardy or sherry like taste. It's actually a desired characteristic of some styles. My suggestion is to drink some now, some in a few weeks, and some later. That way you can see juyst what effect it has on the beer. Not only will you get to enjoy your brew, you'll also learn about oxidation an the flavors associated with it.

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Old 02-14-2009, 02:25 AM   #10
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dark on top means the yeast is falling to the bottom. with less yeast in suspension it looks darker which is a good thing. Not as much yeastr to reflect the ligh. Yeast slowly falls over time. You can speed it up by crash cooling it down to low 40s

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