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Old 01-03-2014, 07:05 PM   #1
The_Glue
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Default Where to go next?

I am about to change a lot of my practices:

-i will have total programmable control over my fermentation temps
-i will start to use yeast nutrient
-i will try out star-san
-i got a ph meter
-i can do full, powerful boils now
-i still use tapwater but i can precipate now for lower hco3 content, control the cloride/sulfate ratio and the amount of ca and i will use campden
-i still use various dry yeasts
-i got myself an auto-syphon
-i still bottle carb, from now on i will use sugar boiled in water (instead of putting unsanitized sugar in the bottles)

What should i invest in in the future? A RO water system? Wort oxigenator? Should i start using liquid yeast? What else?

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Old 01-03-2014, 07:35 PM   #2
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Liquid yeast will give you more choices for the types of beer you want to make but along with liquid yeast comes the necessity of oxygenating the wort because the yeast use the oxygen to help build cell walls. While many people make decent beer by just splashing the wort to incorporate oxygen, a air pump and air stone is better and pure oxygen is better yet. If you don't want to explore the flavors that the various yeasts create forget I mentioned anything.

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Old 01-03-2014, 08:18 PM   #3
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Do you have a good grain mill?

Edit: You mentioned pH and water so I assumed you were doing all grain. I guess I should have asked that, otherwise the mill suggestion is a little silly.

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Old 01-03-2014, 08:21 PM   #4
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My suggestions:

Hardware big enough to do 10 gal batches. You will spend about 30 minutes longer to get twice the amount of beer.

You don't mention if you do all grain or not. If not - consider doing it. It presents the ultimate control over the process and allows you to get everything exactly like you want it, not to mention its cheaper.

Kegging. Sure beats bottling

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Old 01-03-2014, 09:27 PM   #5
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I do all-grain.
The reason why i am not sure about kegging and bigger equipment is that i would rather brew every weekend for a year at first until i have tried enough styles and recipes and i don't drink that much and i don't want to give away beer until i am satisfied with the beer.

A grain mill sounds like a good idea. Do i have to worry about oxygenating until i use dry yeast only?

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Old 01-03-2014, 10:19 PM   #6
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Get a stirplate for starters if you want to move to liquid yeast. Pitching more yeast removes some of the oxygen requirement. A tiny amount of olive oil is also said to help. About what will stick to the end of a toothpick.

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Old 01-04-2014, 08:20 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Riot View Post
Get a stirplate for starters if you want to move to liquid yeast. Pitching more yeast removes some of the oxygen requirement. A tiny amount of olive oil is also said to help. About what will stick to the end of a toothpick.
It would be cool if i could skip shaking glass fermenters and just use a drop (or fraction of a drop) of olive oil instead.

Should i add the olive oil when the wort cooled down to around 60-70F? And then add the yeast nutrient and the dry yeast?
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Old 01-04-2014, 11:01 AM   #8
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I've been adding olive oil during the boil and nutrient at flameout.

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Old 01-05-2014, 06:48 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Riot View Post
I've been adding olive oil during the boil
That seems like a good way to avoid infections. Can the fatty acids survive the boil?
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Old 01-05-2014, 11:57 AM   #10
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Olive oil stays intact to like 300 F, a boil won't degrade it.

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