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Old 10-06-2009, 05:07 AM   #1
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Default Whats a dry yeast sub for Wyeast 1056?

I'm breaking the bank, what's a good sub here?

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Old 10-06-2009, 05:09 AM   #2
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SafAle US-05 American Ale.

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Old 10-06-2009, 05:09 AM   #3
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Safale Us-05

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Old 10-06-2009, 10:33 AM   #4
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Also, you can put some of your liquid yeast starter in the fridge and use it to make a new starter down the line

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Old 10-06-2009, 10:55 AM   #5
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It's not a sub, Us-05 IS the same strain, the famed Chico strain. In fact there's really no point in spending the extra bucks on 1056, and having to make a starter when you want a clean ale yeast.

I have found that a lot of new brewers especially, THINK they HAVE to use liquid yeast, but in reality most ales can be made with Notty, Windsor, Us-05, Us-04 and many lagers with basic Saflager.....7-8 bucks a pop for liquid as opposed to $1.50-2.50 for dry, with more cell count, is imho just a waste of money for the majority of a brewer's recipe bank...most commercial ales us a limited range of strains, and those liquid strains are really the same strains that the afore mentioned dry strains cover, for example Us-05 is the famed "Chico strain", so if you are paying 7-8 bucks for Wyeast 1056 American/Chico Ale Yeast, and you STILL have to make a starter to have enough viable cells, then you are ripping yourself off, in terms of time and money....

I use dry yeast for 99% of my beers, for basic ales I use safale 05, for more british styles I us safale 04 and for basic lagers I use saflager..

The only time I use liquid yeast is if I am making a beer where the yeast drives the style, where certain flavor characteristics are derived from the yeast, such as phenols. Like Belgian beers, where you get spicy/peppery flavors from the yeast and higher temp fermentation. Or let's say a wheat beer (needing a lowly flocculant yest) or a Kholsch, where the style of the beer uses a specific yeast strain that is un available in dry form.

But if you are looking for a "clean" yeast profile, meaning about 90% of american ales, the 05, or nottingham is the way to go. Need "Bready" or yeasty for English ales, then 04 or windsor. Want a clean, low profile lager yeast- saflager usually does the trick.

Here's some info here, http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/dry...ptions-131810/

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Old 10-06-2009, 12:49 PM   #6
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Aye - US-05 is the same strain as WLP001 or WY1056, so you can use them interchangeably. There are, however, differences between them, especially in mouthfeel. Nottingham lends a tart edge that I dislike, though YMMV.

However, I take odds with the assertion that using liquid yeast is de facto more expensive than using dry yeast. Proper yeast management is key. I often split starters grown up from that initial vial or smack pack to keep a store of first generation yeast on hand for growing up later.

But that is a topic for another thread.

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Old 10-06-2009, 01:43 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyangler18 View Post
However, I take odds with the assertion that using liquid yeast is de facto more expensive than using dry yeast.

But that is a topic for another thread.
Most of the new brewers who "THINK" they NEED to use liquid haven't gotten to the point of their understanding of yeast handling, to often even have an awareness that they can wash, store and re-use ANY yeast, liquid or otherwise. Remember this is the "beginner's beer forum" and my experience has been that people asking this type of question, or wet -vs- dry dry discussion, have not come upon yeast handling info yet.

So, yeah this is a topic for another thread, which it often has been.

I was just giving "basic" information, based on discussions I have had with new brewers who have asked similar questions to this one.

And based on the Op's mentioning that he's "breaking the bank" I would say he's not at that stage either.

So I maintain what I said originally, to someone who uses and dumps their liquid yeast, and doesn't harvest, spending 7-10 dollars for the same strain of yeast that costs 2-3 dollars dry, is a waste of money.

It changes is you harvest and recycle.

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Old 10-06-2009, 02:25 PM   #8
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Yeah, I could be done with liquid yeast myself for basic house brews. Even if you re-use it you have to spend the time and money on a yeast starter.

If you do a 1/2 gallon starter along with a liquid yeast it could be $11 for yeast along with the time needed to make the starter. If you use Notty it's like $1.50.

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Old 07-26-2010, 09:10 PM   #9
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Liquid yeast is only a feasible option if you wash your yeast and reuse. I use both, dry when I don't have time to build a starter from my washed liquid yeast collection, and liquid when I think ahead or need to build a BIG starter for a big beer (instead of multiple dry packets).

If I had started brewing with dry yeast I might never had begun to wash liquid yeast.

But a yeast starter is not that expensive, especially if you save runnings from your previous batch for your starter wort.

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Old 07-26-2010, 09:17 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
It's not a sub, Us-05 IS the same strain, the famed Chico strain. In fact there's really no point in spending the extra bucks on 1056, and having to make a starter when you want a clean ale yeast.

I have found that a lot of new brewers especially, THINK they HAVE to use liquid yeast, but in reality most ales can be made with Notty, Windsor, Us-05, Us-04 and many lagers with basic Saflager.....7-8 bucks a pop for liquid as opposed to $1.50-2.50 for dry, with more cell count, is imho just a waste of money for the majority of a brewer's recipe bank...most commercial ales us a limited range of strains, and those liquid strains are really the same strains that the afore mentioned dry strains cover, for example Us-05 is the famed "Chico strain", so if you are paying 7-8 bucks for Wyeast 1056 American/Chico Ale Yeast, and you STILL have to make a starter to have enough viable cells, then you are ripping yourself off, in terms of time and money....

I use dry yeast for 99% of my beers, for basic ales I use safale 05, for more british styles I us safale 04 and for basic lagers I use saflager..

The only time I use liquid yeast is if I am making a beer where the yeast drives the style, where certain flavor characteristics are derived from the yeast, such as phenols. Like Belgian beers, where you get spicy/peppery flavors from the yeast and higher temp fermentation. Or let's say a wheat beer (needing a lowly flocculant yest) or a Kholsch, where the style of the beer uses a specific yeast strain that is un available in dry form.

But if you are looking for a "clean" yeast profile, meaning about 90% of american ales, the 05, or nottingham is the way to go. Need "Bready" or yeasty for English ales, then 04 or windsor. Want a clean, low profile lager yeast- saflager usually does the trick.

Here's some info here, http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/dry...ptions-131810/
Exaclty - I used to use liquid yeast almost always thinking they were better. Now I use dry probably 90% of the time exaclty for the reasons Revvy mentioned:

Same yeast but cheaper.
Not starter no fuss - just sprinkle on top of the wort
Ussually start within 12 hours
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