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Old 02-12-2010, 05:09 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Daparish View Post
I've got some questions about the yeast cake:

1. Is it possible to remove the layer of trub from a fermenter with out disturbing the yeast layer? Does this depend on the flocculation of the yeast? How important is it to re-sanitize around the yeast cake before you drop the new wort on it?
nope - they're mixed together pretty good - Yeast Washing if you want to separate. No need to sanitize - it had wort on it, you're putting wort on it. Just make sure your transfer devices are clean and sanitized. A fresh wipe around the neck (if carboy) and you're good to go.

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2. I want to do this! I've ordered the making of an American Amber using Wyeast American Ale II yeast. After I brew that and let is sit in primary for three- four weeks, I was thinking of brewing a Stone Ruination Clone. The Ruination clone recipe calls for Wyeast London ESB strain, not American Ale II, although those strains are very similar in attenuation, flocculation, temp, etc. Would it be ok to throw the Ruination onto the pre-used yeast cake?
Yes, I'd throw the clone on top - just keep notes, so you know how to repeat it if/when it turns out awesome.


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Old 02-13-2010, 12:50 PM   #12
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Thanks for the tips on what beer types you can move washed yeast to. Yeast washing is what promted the original question.



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Old 02-13-2010, 12:51 PM   #13
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Thanks for the tips on what beer types you can move washed yeast to. Yeast washing is what promted the original question.
If you do yeast washing, you can do any kind of beer with the yeast. It's "clean" yeast, just like you'd get out of a vial.
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Old 02-13-2010, 12:54 PM   #14
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Is this just true if you're aiming for a lighter beer? I was thinking of putting a Belgian Blonde type recipe on top of a yeast cake from a Triple that I'm about to bottle next week. I was hoping this would make the Blonde "bigger" than normal. Or will it totally ruin it?

From what I've heard it's much harder to ruin a beer as opposed to just not get out what you intended to put in. I just want to make sure what I'm about to do doesn't make for something that's undrinkable. A surprise wouldn't be something I am opposed to however.
You don't want to put a blonde on a cake from a triple. A triple is a very high OG beer, and the yeast will be stressed. Also, you'd be overpitching by quite a bit. You could go the other way- from a blonde to a triple, since you need more yeast for a triple, but you don't want to put a low gravity blonde onto the triple cake.

You could use a portion of the yeast cake if you really want to. I wouldn't, because the yeast is pretty stressed from the high gravity fermentation, but you could consult mrmalty.com's yeast pitching calculator to determine the correct amount of yeast to use out of the remaining slurry.
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Old 02-13-2010, 02:58 PM   #15
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What is the issue with over pitching yeast? I mean what does it do to the beer?

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Old 02-13-2010, 03:02 PM   #16
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What is the issue with over pitching yeast? I mean what does it do to the beer?
I was curious about this as well. I've never done a batch with the yeast cake from a prior batch. Overpitching could be an issue then, correct?
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Old 02-13-2010, 03:06 PM   #17
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I was curious about this as well. I've never done a batch with the yeast cake from a prior batch. Overpitching could be an issue then, correct?
no idea.. I have a centenniel blond in the fermentor right now...planning on going to secondary next week . I wanted to brew another centenniel blond ( friends all love it) the same day I transfer and just pour it right on the yeast cake. some say no problem.... others say wash the yeast....I am confused
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Old 02-13-2010, 03:07 PM   #18
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I was curious about this as well. I've never done a batch with the yeast cake from a prior batch. Overpitching could be an issue then, correct?
Yes. From White Lab's website:

If the beer is overpitched, yeast do not grow though a complete growth cycle. This results in few new yeast cells, which makes for unhealthy yeast and low viability by the end of fermentation.

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To me, the issue would be more off-flavors from the stressed yeast. You'd be using yeast from a high alcohol environment, from a high gravity fermentation, to ferment a lower OG beer.

In order to have the best results in brewing, ideally you'd use the healthiest yeast you could. Using unhealthy yeast, and overpitching besides, may be just as bad as severely underpitching the yeast.

I wouldn't do it. If I wanted to use that yeast again, I'd at least do a basic yeast washing procedure.
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Old 02-13-2010, 03:34 PM   #19
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ok another question....if the yeast are viable, why do they not ferment the beer out dry? w
Why do they quit before 1.000???

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Old 02-13-2010, 04:04 PM   #20
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ok another question....if the yeast are viable, why do they not ferment the beer out dry? w
Why do they quit before 1.000???
Yeast can only eat some types of sugars. It can't eat starches or other complex carbohydrates. You'll particularly hear people talk about "dextrins" which are long chain carbohydrates that add thickness or "mouthfeel" to the beer.

On a side note: The job of the "mash" is to release enzymes to convert the barley starches into sugars that the yeast can eat.


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