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Old 05-23-2013, 12:17 PM   #41
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I definitely will. It won't be for another several months though.

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Old 06-10-2013, 03:54 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by looneybomber View Post
Your carbonation won't get better.

And here's a tip. With every batch of beer, bottle one beer in a brown plastic (PET) bottle so you can squeeze it to check carb levels. No need to uncap.
Dude this is a great idea for any occasion. I have just had my old Mr. Beer Bottles sitting in a cupboard.
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Old 06-10-2013, 10:35 AM   #43
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Look on youtube, I did. "Quick carbonation beer"

What I did, bought a cheap steel CO2 tank, regulator, A auto-tire inflator chuck and hose, A "bolt in tire stem", drilled into a coke bottle lid, poured the "quart jar of homebrew" into it,squeezed out the air, turned the gas up to 50psi, gassed it, Shook like crazy, refrigerated it, shook like crazy, regassed it once the bottle softened up (the beer absorbing up the gas). If the beer is real cold, it absorbs more. IF it has a real high alcohol content, it will hot hold it thou, it releases it.. something about solubility? or Soapy texture??

Cokes, thou they tell me are shipped at near 50psi, I would never have believed that. NOW, I've done cream sodas, Rootbeer, 10 calorie koolaid zip packs, beer, wine, iced tea (that sucked), my favorite, fizzy lemonade.

They say you can use a pellet gun CO2 cartridge.. I don't know about that, how would you hook up the regulator?

I didn't have enough bottles the first time I had a batch come out, I tried to use quart mason jars to bottle, well.. some are fizzy, some are not.. hit and miss. I'd say that was my first failure. I was-am hunting a upright freezer to make myself a keg-cooler, knew I was going to end up with a CO2 tank anyways. There is one locally this morning for $30.. I am all over that.

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Old 06-12-2013, 06:38 PM   #44
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Quote:
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Your carbonation won't get better.

Long story short, I've had carb issues on a couple big beers. Reydrate a $1 packet of champagne yeast. I use EC1118. Using 2oz of water let's you squirt 1mL into each of the 12oz bottles.

And here's a tip. With every batch of beer, bottle one beer in a brown plastic (PET) bottle so you can squeeze it to check carb levels. No need to uncap.
I have the same problem and have some Lalvin D47 in the fridge from 11/12 (I'll check to make sure it's not expired) do you think this would work as good as the EC1118? I checked the d47's datasheet and it says it's good to 14%... just don't know if it ill have even close to that sparkling effervescence that the ec1118 would being champagne yeast...

Update: Well on 6/14 I went ahead and used the d47 and followed looneybomber's directions above. Since I bottle in 22oz and 16oz bottles in addition to 12oz I just adjusted accordingly (I did 1.5mL in the 16oz bottles and 2mL in the 22oz bottles). We'll see how it works out. I am thinking to leave them to sit for a month and then crack one. Will post results.
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Old 07-12-2013, 04:55 PM   #45
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Quote:
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I had a couple of friends over and pulled out a special bottle of a highly-aged tripel to share. It was dead flat. Fortunately I had started experimenting with modifying soda siphons to work with my Kegging Part invention and decided to give it a try. The beer carb'd instantly but came out as a glass full of foam. I still haven't worked the kinks out of that but in a pinch, putting your beer into a modified soda siphon will carbonate it. Once the foam settles, the beer that remains is carbonated.
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I actually did that last night. Third batch I ever made, my brain shut down when I started bottling and I dumped sugar in the bucket instead of making a syrup. No bombs, but several are "extra fizzy" and a bunch more just suck. I dump them in the soda machine bottle and hit the button a couple times.
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Old 07-12-2013, 05:08 PM   #46
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If I were going to reintroduce yeast into the bottles, I'd use the same yeast I brewed with. The reason is simple. Not all yeasts eat exactly the same thing. If they did, we'd probably brew with only one or two yeasts. Here's a practical example and one that I know from experience:

Ferment 5 gallons of Motts Apple juice with Nottingham yeast. OG starts at about 1.048. FG is about 1.004

Ferment 5 gallons of Motts Apple juice with Red Star Champagne yeast. OG starts at about 1.048. FG is about .995.

Champagne yeast could conceivably turn an unprimed beer into a bottle bomb because what wasn't a primer for your original yeast could be more than sufficient for champagne yeast. I realize that the gravity left is not likely to do so, but the potential is there. More importantly, why let another yeast eat something that you intentionally left there by using the other yeast.

If you decide to reintroduce yeast to the bottles, just make a yeast starter from your original yeast and use something that the yeast will stick to as a dipstick. Dip in starter, then in bottle, repeat until you run out of bottles. I'd probably use the handle of a wooden spoon that I'd soaked in star san. Wood's porous so there's still a bit of a risk of infection, but you're dealing with individual bottles and not the whole batch at once, so each bottle rolls individually against the probability of infection which should be pretty small.

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Old 07-12-2013, 05:15 PM   #47
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This thread gives me hope, I think it will probably be a year or so until my DIPA brews are ready. I was losing hope its been 4 weeks and all I get is the initial pfft when I open it and it tastes like a sugary mess.

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Old 09-03-2013, 10:15 AM   #48
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whenever I brew a 8%+ beer I always add a few granules of a neutral or champagne yeast to each bottle just for piece of mind.

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Old 09-03-2013, 06:00 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hbrookie View Post
If I were going to reintroduce yeast into the bottles, I'd use the same yeast I brewed with. The reason is simple. Not all yeasts eat exactly the same thing. If they did, we'd probably brew with only one or two yeasts. Here's a practical example and one that I know from experience:

Ferment 5 gallons of Motts Apple juice with Nottingham yeast. OG starts at about 1.048. FG is about 1.004

Ferment 5 gallons of Motts Apple juice with Red Star Champagne yeast. OG starts at about 1.048. FG is about .995.

Champagne yeast could conceivably turn an unprimed beer into a bottle bomb because what wasn't a primer for your original yeast could be more than sufficient for champagne yeast. I realize that the gravity left is not likely to do so, but the potential is there. More importantly, why let another yeast eat something that you intentionally left there by using the other yeast.

If you decide to reintroduce yeast to the bottles, just make a yeast starter from your original yeast and use something that the yeast will stick to as a dipstick. Dip in starter, then in bottle, repeat until you run out of bottles. I'd probably use the handle of a wooden spoon that I'd soaked in star san. Wood's porous so there's still a bit of a risk of infection, but you're dealing with individual bottles and not the whole batch at once, so each bottle rolls individually against the probability of infection which should be pretty small.
This is wrong. Wine yeasts only ferment simple sugars. They can't eat the stuff the brewer's yeast leaves behind. All they can eat is the simple (priming) sugar. I had some quads with this same issue (12%) and I uncapped, and added just a little squirt with a sanitzed syringe to each bottle. I mixed some washed slurry in with a little yeast nutrient to squirt in and they carbed in a few weeks when they hadn't carbed after months and months of heat, daily rolling, shaking, etc.
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Old 09-05-2013, 05:43 PM   #50
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I recently had a similar issue with a big barely wine that I made last year. It is a mini-mash clone of the JW Lees Harvest Ale from the Clone Brews book. I followed the recipe almost exactly, I did use a time bit more grains in the mini-mash, and started with an OG of 1.126. I pitched the Irish Ale yeast that was recommended without thinking twice about it. Primary lasted about 6 weeks then I dry hopped in secondary for about 2 weeks if I remember right and the gravity was down to about 1.036. I bottled last November and the book stated that it would be ready to drink 9 month after bottling. I tasted it here and there knowing that it wouldn't be ready until mid-August and it was still dead. I decided to add a yeast that would tolerate the higher alcohol so I carefully poured all bottles back into a sanitized fermenter and pitched some dry wine yeast to it. Fermentation started up again immediately then quickly tapered off. I still have it in a carboy and agitate it frequently. I know the complaints about oxidizing the beer so I was very careful not to splash as I pour all the bottles. Wouldn't re-pitching new yeast need at least some O2 to start fermentation back up? I will let this sit for some time before I take another gravity reading. I opened them all and re-pitched because I felt like the FG wasn't where it should have been and also in hindsight I feel like there is a possibility I may have forgot to put priming sugar in this batch though I did get a small hiss with each bottle opened. I am hoping that I can salvage this batch as I have been looking forward to it for a long time.

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